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AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The LIBRARY of CONGRESS 



IN 




Packard Campus 
for Audio Visual Conservation 
www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 

www.loc.gov/rr/niopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 




PUBLISHER'S BIHBP 



JULY 2, 1956 



35c PER COPY 




X Outlines Way 
Television May Go 
Page 27 



WICHITA 




is BIG BUSINESS 



Soaring ever higher is Wichita's daily re- 
tail sales rate... now topping $1,000,000! 
KTVH dominates this hub of the rich 
Central Kansas area... a diversified area 
with income derived from oil, cattle, 
agriculture, and aircraft industry. 

To sell in this thriving Kansas market, 
buy KTVH with unduplicated 
CBS-TV coverage. 

KTVH 

CBS-TV FOR CENTRAL KANSAS 




Main office and studios in Hutchinson. Office and studio 
in Wichita (Hotel Lassen). Howard O. Peterson, General 
Manager. Represented nationally by H-R Television, Inc. 



CHANNEL 12 



VHF- 240,000 WATT 




WTVR EXCELS 

I ftJ ^ C^\ki F P A Operating on CHANNEL 6 WTVR is the only station in the Richmond area author- 

UN V* V/ Y tlvHV/t i Z ed to operate in the PREFERRED LOW-END OF THE VHF BAND. No other station 
in this area can equal WTVR's WIDE AREA COVERAGE. 

WTVR EXCELS 

I K| C Afl ITI CC CHANNEL 6 with 100,000 WATTS is operated from one of the highest self-support- 
UN r^^^rf I I* I 1 I ing an tennas in America, 1049 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL. There is no higher elevation 
in the Richmond area, and only WTVR can assure coverage from its antenna located in the heart of the City of Richmond. 
WTVR is the only station in this area which has studio facilities in Richmond. In short "The South's First TV Station" is RICH- 
MOND'S ONLY TV STATION WITH COMPLETE RICHMOND FACILITIES. 

WTVR EXCELS 

IM P D f\ P A K fa C WTVR LEADS IN THE LATEST PULSE SURVEY ACROSS THE BOARD. No station 
11^ I i^^^mf ▼ j n this area equals it. In one day WTVR produces more local programs, starting 

at 7 a.m. each day, than all other stations in this area combined. And remember, WTVR programs require no antenna to be 
received. 

WTVR EXCELS 

THROUGHOUT THE DAY -IN EVERY WAY 



Represented Nationally by Blair Tv, Inc — Affiliated With ABC-TV Network. 



The Leader.... 




DES MOINES TELEVISION-CHANNEL 8 IN IOWA 



Look at these commanding audience ratings! 



FULL POWER-FULL COVERAGE 



337 FIRSTS 

in 462 quarter hours 
surveyed 

9 of top 10 

multi-weekly shows- 
local news ratings up 
to 35.4 



FULL POWER-FULL COVERAGE 



TELEVISION 



ows 



SOURCE: LATEST A-R-B FOR 
DES MOINES METROPOLITAN AREA 



Katz Has The Facts On That— 
Very Highly Audience Rated, 
Sales Results Premeditated, 
CBS Affiliated 

Station in Des Moines! 



DeSalra StTw M wWn*Xn h fi Xearbook Numbers (53rd and 54th issues) published in January and July by Broadcasting Publications, Inc., 1735 
uebales St., N.W., Washington 6, D. C. Entered as second class matter March 14. 1933, at Post Office at Washington, D. C, under act of March 3 1879. 





THE EYES OF'TEXAS ARE ON 




KRLD-TV HAS THE GREATEST DALLAS 
VIEWING AUDIENCE BY, FAR, OF ALL 
DALLAS-FT. WORTH TV STATIONS 



MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 

7 AM - 12 MID. 

STATION AVERAGE AUDIENCE 

KRLD-TV 41% 

STATION B 29% 

STATION C ........... . 22% 

STATION D 8% 

SUNDAYS 

KRLD-TV 48% 

STATION B 31 % 

STATION C 12% 

STATION D 9% 

These averages have been determined by the use of 
the Telepulse Report, Dallas Metropolitan Area, 
April, 1956. 



NO OTHER TV STATION IN TEXAS 

GIVES YOU AS MUCH COVERAGE AS 



MAXIMUM 



>\» • ♦ • • • • 



POWER 



Owners and operators of KRLD - 50,000 Watts, The Dallas Times 
Herald Station, Herald Square, Dallas 2, Texas. 

JOHN W. RUNYON, Chairman of the Board — CLYDE W. REMBERT, President 

REPRESENTED BY THE BRANHAM COMPANY 



Page 4 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



closed circuit 



INSIDE, SENATE SIDE • Here's inside 
on Senate Commerce Committee's ap- 
proach to tv problem: Committee is revis- 
ing its planned interim report on allocations 
in light of FCC allocations report last week 
and hopes for full committee approval of 
new draft. It would comment on FCC re- 
port, praising FCC for finally acting and 
expressing hope Commission is serious 
about carrying through its proposals. Com- 
ments would indicate approval of some 
FCC proposals, doubt about others. Sen- 
ate report would replace planned interim 
reports by both majority and minority seg- 
ments of the committee. 



B»T 



ORIGINAL majority report (before FCC 
action) had recommended selective dein- 
termixture on broad enough scale to sup- 
port uhf and removal of 10% federal 
excise tax on all-channel sets or at least 
all-channel color sets. Report asked "non- 
disruptive" deintermixture: (1) keep vhf 
out of all-uhf markets; (2) hold back vhfs 
where not granted or not on air in uhf 
markets; (3) delete single on-air vhfs in uhf 
markets unless vhf provides only service for 
"substantial" number of homes, except for 
keeping balance between sole service to cer- 
tain remote areas and multiple service to 
more people in center of market area; (4) 
substitute vhf if possible for uhfs in two- 
vhf markets; (5) try to provide vhfs for 
areas overshadowed by big-city vhfs and 
where geographic and physical conditions 
argue for utilizing advantages of vhf. 

B»T 

NEW BRICKER APPROACH • Minority 
report urged FCC to declare policy to ( 1 ) 
move all tv to uhf in major part of country 
after finding uhf is technically mature 
enough to support tv system; (2) find gaps 
in uhf technology and sponsor crash pro- 
gram to fill them; (3) hold continuing pro- 
ceedings with comments during move; (4) 
authorize 5,000 kw for uhfs; (5) grant 
temporary "stop-gap" deintermixture to 
strengthen competition; (6) continue grant- 
ing uhfs and vhf consistent with (5). Re- 
port called for 5-8-year transition period 
and simultaneous uhf-vhf transmission to 
amortize equipment and sets and use of 
vhf-only for certain geographical condi- 
tions. Plan would turn remaining vhf band 
over to non-broadcast services. Both ma- 
jority and minority reports favored giving 
existing outlets priority at new grants. 

B»T 

WCAO Baltimore, acquired by Plough Inc. 
for $590,710 [B»T, March 26], has noti- 
fied CBS Radio it will cancel affiliation and 
go independent effective with contract ex- 
piration Dec. 6. CBS Radio is negotiating 
with other Baltimore outlets, it's under- 
stood, with likelihood that new affiliation 
will be announced within next few weeks. 



WHERE'S PAT? • With special presenta- 
tion reported to be one of most am- 
bitious that network ever prepared, Sly- 
vester L. Weaver Jr., NBC chairman of 
board, last week had series of quiet meet- 
ings with top executives of automotive 
companies in Detroit. Essence of his pres- 
entation is that makers of autos and parts 
cannot hope to put needed push behind 
sales without extensive use of tv advertis- 
ing. He's said to have renewed two ac- 
counts (A.C. Sparkplugs and United 
Motors) and to be hot on trail of new 
business. 

B«T 

IF AUTO MAKERS don't start jumping 
on tv bandwagon, they'll have only them- 
selves to blame. They're getting lot of 
original research these days from tv mis- 
sionaries trying to rid them of their ages- 
old newspaper bias, and they're due to get 
more. In addition to special auto studies 
revealed last week by TvB and ABC-TV 
(see stories page 35), NBC-TV is getting 
ready to break one conducted by Advertest 
Research and pointing up, like others, 
dealer preference for tv as means of getting 
prospects into show rooms. 

B«T 

NO BACKDOWN • While there's com- 
plete silence around NARTB headquarters 
about proposal of disgruntled group of tv 
code subscribers to form independent code 
unit, one thing is certain — association isn't 
scaring easily. Instead of letting up in an- 
nounced crackdown against persistent code 
violators, it's known that code staff is under 
orders to toughen up its monitoring and 
station-contact work. Most tv code activity 
is handled quietly, on person-to-person 
basis. Some code officials contend pub- 
licizing of any station revolt from ethical 
structure is just what tv needs to convince 
critics that document is really doing effec- 
tive job of raising calibre of telecasting. 

B»T 

HERSHEY Chocolate Corp., which since 
its founding early in century has never ad- 
vertised, may change its policy. Both J. 
Walter Thompson Co. and BBDO report- 
edly are preparing presentations for Penn- 
sylvania company to cover all media. 

LOOKING IN CHICAGO • Anomalous 
situation whereby WGN-AM cancels its 
affiliation with Mutual effective Aug. 31 
[B«T, May 7] although it is minority stock- 
holder, has sent Mutual President John B. 
Poor searching for new affiliate or acquisi- 
tion of station. It's understood that over- 
tures were made to WJJD Chicago, owned 
by Plough Inc., for acquisition but was 
told that station was not for sale. Latest 
records show WGN Inc. to be 2.16% 
stockholder in MBS, but it's understood it 
disposes of that interest to General Tele- 
radio, MBS parent which holds 95.3%, 
upon disaffiliation. 



FINAL two days of hearings by Senate 
Commerce Committee in probe of tv net- 
works and uhf-vhf won't be held until 
sometime after July 9. Staff was shooting 
for that date at Chairman Magnuson's sug- 
gestion but ran into conflicting schedules. 
FCC testimony on its allocations report 
expected to occupy final day of sessions. 

B«T 

SLEEPER • Tucked away in FCC's new 
tv allocation report and order (see full 
text on perforated pages 91 to 97) is highly 
significant provision (No. 32) that could 
mean additional stations for number of 
markets without departing from engineer- 
ing standards. It is provision to measure 
spacings (mileage separations) from trans- 
mitter-to-transmitter, instead of main post 
office-to-post office. Latter is unrealistic 
since post office locations aren't necessarily 
in center of cities. T-to-t separations, on 
other hand, do what FCC originally in- 
tended anyway. 

B»T 

PRESSURE of committee legislative ac- 
tivity has caused Edward Jarrett, chief 
clerk of Senate Commerce Committee, to 
reverse his decision to become chief aide 
to J. Leonard Reinsch in handling of Chi- 
cago Democratic convention [B»T, June 
18]. Mr. Jarrett originally had agreed to ac- 
cept appointment, with acquiescence of 
Chairman Magnuson (D-Wash.), but in- 
dications that Congress will remain in ses- 
sion until end of July, forced reversal. 

B»T 

STILL IN BALL GAME • Commodore 
E. M. Webster, whose term on FCC ended 
last Saturday, after nine years as commis- 
sioner and 47 years in government service, 
will retire from government but not from 
communications. While he will take short 
vacation, it is expected he will be avail- 
able for private consultancy at policy level, 
headquartering in Washington. He is ex- 
pert in marine, safety-of-life and communi- 
cations engineering, and during his 30 
years in Coast Guard served several ten- 
ures as chief communications officer. 

B»T 

NATIONAL Women's Christian Temper- 
ance Union apparently believes there's 
more than one way to skin cat. Failing 
to get legislation passed this year to ban 
liquor advertising on radio-tv and other 
media, they've asked to testify before Sen- 
ate Commerce Committee in support of 
Bricker bill for network regulation. 

B»T 

GOTHAM BRANCH • Potent sniping at 
broadcasters, radio and tv alike, by organ- 
izations and all sorts of individual inter- 
ests may bring about long-planned move 
to open NARTB office in New York. This 
would be designed to strengthen relations 
with other media, business associations 
and advertising pursuits as well as to serv- 
ice large number of inquiries that origi- 
nate in New York. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 5 




That's okay, TIME Magazine . . . 

. . . you transposed the call letters of Omaha's 
most-listened-to radio station 6 different times 
in the June 4th* issue . . . 

. . . but Hooper, Pulse and Trendex 
have it straight: 

The call letters of the radio station with 

the biggest audience all day . . . are K-O-W-H. 

Hooper says so to the tune of 44.2% of the 
audience. 

Pulse agrees to the tune of 204 out of 240 first 
place quarter hours for K-O-W-H. 

Trendex chimes in with firsts for K-O-W-H 
in every time period. 



For some good TfME in the right spots, call 
KOWH General Manager Virgil Sharpe, or the 
H-R man. 




WDGY, Minneapolis-St. Paul KOWH, Omaha WHB. Kansas City WTIX, New Orleans WQAM*. Miami 
Represented by Represented by Represented by Representee by Represented by 

Avery- Knodel, Inc. H-R Reps. Inc. John Blair & Co. Adam J. Younq, Jr. John Blair & Co. 

* Transfer subject fo FCC approval 

Page 6 • July 2, 1956 Broadcasting • Telecasting 



at deadline 



NAME BANDS ON WEEKDAY MORNINGS 
NEW TACK FOR NBC RADIO PROGRAMMING 



PLAN for two-hour daily program of live 
music featuring "name" orchestras was un- 
veiled by NBC Radio Friday as its nomination 
for successor to morning portion of Weekday 
service, which has been center of controversy 
since it started last November and which, NBC 
revealed, will go off air July 27. 

Details of new programming, slated for 10 
a.m. to 12 noon spot Mondays through Fridays 
and tentatively titled NBC Bandstand, were 
laid before NBC affiliates executives committee 
in all-day meeting Friday and will be presented 
to all NBC Radio affiliates by closed circuit at 
noon today (Mon.). Network officials said they 
definitely plan to start Bandstand July 30. 

It will be sold to advertisers on same basis 
as Weekday — in one-minute, 30-second, and 
six-second participations — and compensation to 
stations also will be on Weekday basis. 

There was some discussion of station com- 
pensation during meeting, participants said, but 
prospects of raising it were linked primarily 
to whether or not new programming revitalizes 
advertiser interest. There was no question of 
raising compensation merely because of CBS 
Radio's similar action few weeks ago [B«T, 
June 11, et seq.], authorities reported. 

Among name bands being considered for 
Bandstand, NBC said, are those of Dorsey 
Brothers, Benny Goodman, Guy Lombardo, 



May Tv Network Gross 
Up 21.4% Over 1955's 

MAY TV NETWORK gross time sales totaled 
$40,610,429, gain of 21.4% over May 1955 
billings, Publishers Information Bureau re- 
ported Friday. For five-month period, January- 
May, 1956 gross for tv networks was $196,- 
267,677, up 18.6% from gross for same period 
of last year. PIB's network-by-network com- 
parison of 1956 and 1955 tv network gross time 
sales follows: 





MAY 


% 




1956 


1955 


Change 


ABC 


$ 6,639,132 


$ 3,606,427 


+ 84.1 


CBS 


18,260,894 


15,978,680 


+ 14.3 


DuM.* 


273,640 




NBC 


15,710,403 


13,591,687 


+ 15.6 


Total 


$ 40,610,429 


$ 33,450,434 


+21.4 




JAN. 


-MAY 


% 




1956 


1955 


Change 


ABC 


$ 32,361,238 


$ 18,226,301 


+77.6 


CBS 


88,563,636 


77,967,657 


+ 13.6 


DuM.* 




2,685,835 




NBC 


75,342,803 


66,572,049 


+ 13.2 


Total 


$196,267,677 


$165,451,842 


+ 18.6 



* DuMont dropped its network operation in Sept. 1955. 

KXXL Sold for $125,000 

KXXL Monterey, Calif., sold by Stephen A. 
Cisler to Pacific Ventures Inc. (among owners: 
Morton Downey, singer; H. G. Wells, manager, 
KOLO Reno), Reno, Nev., corporation. Price 
was $125,000. Transaction is subject to FCC 
approval. Blackburn-Hamilton Co. handled 
sale. KXXL operates on 630 kc with 1 kw and 
is daytime independent. Mr. Cisler recently 
sold KEAR San Francisco to David Segal, prin- 
cipal in Mid-America Broadcasting Co., for 
$500,000. Station had been off air temporarily 
because of tax lien but resumed operations 
[B»T, June 25]. 



Freddie Martin, Sammy Kaye, Les Brown, 
Xavier Cugat, Harry James, Ray Anthony and 
Louis Armstrong. Bandstand idea attributed 
largely to William R. (Billy) Goodheart, show 
business veteran who joined NBC in May. 

Lester W. Lindow of WFDF Flint, Mich., 
chairman of affiliates executive committee, re- 
ported after meeting that his committee had 
presented to NBC officials "a wide variety of 
views and opinions about radio broadcasting 
which had been received from the individual 
stations throughout the country. These were 
received with great interest by the network 
officials and were discussed and reviewed . . ." 

Network delegation was headed by President 
Robert W. Sarnoff, who stressed commercial 
success of weekend Monitor (after which Week- 
day was patterned), and Board Chairman Syl- 
vester L. (Pat) Weaver Jr. Other participants 
included Charles R. Denny, vice president for 
owned stations and spot sales; Al Capstaff, ex- 
ecutive producer of Monitor, and Kenneth W. 
Bilby, vice president for public relations. 

Executive committeemen are Mr. Lindow; 
George Harvey, WFLA Tampa, Fla.; William 
Rines, WCSH Portland, Me.; Ben Larson, 
KDYL Salt Lake City; George Wagner, KFI 
Los Angeles; David Baltimore, WBRE Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa.; Leonard Reinsch, WSB Atlanta, and 
Harold Hough, WBAP Fort Worth. 



Crowell-Collier Announces 
Closing 'American Magazine' 

CROWELL-COLLIER Pub Co. announced Fri- 
day it will (1) cease publication of American 
Magazine with August issue, and ( 2 ) raise ad- 
vertising rates of Collier's and Woman's Home 
Companion, into which American's editorial 
content will be integrated starting with Sep- 
tember issues. Collier's and Companion rates 
go up 12%, and another 10% will be added to 
Collier's based on rise in guaranteed circulation 
from 3.7 million to 4 million per issue. 

C-C, which retains American title "for use 
in another context in the future," explained de- 
cision by saying American's basic editorial 
functions are now "overlapped" by two others. 
Publisher Paul C. Smith said C-C's "reorienta- 
tion-refocusing drive is taking us deeply into 
the television, radio and phonograph record 
business" but that C-C's "first order of the 
day" will be to continue publishing national 
magazines. C-C has bought, subject to FCC 
approval, KFWB Hollywood, Calif.; KULA- 
AM-TV Honolulu, and Consolidated Television 
& Radio Broadcasters Inc. (Harry M. Bitner 
interests) in Indianapolis, Grand Rapids, Min- 
neapolis and Flint, for total of six radio and 
four tv stations [B»T, April 30, et seq.] 

Seeks Majority Control 

FCC Friday was asked to approve transfer of 
control of KMVI-AM-TV Wailuku, T. H., to 
J. Walter Cameron, present 41.7% stockholder. 
Mr. Cameron, local businessman, purchases, 
subject to FCC approval, 41% of stations held 
by Maui Pineapple Co., for $30,950. KMVI-TV 
is on ch. 12 and is satellite of KONA (TV) 
Honolulu. KMVI is 550 kc, 1 kw. 



• BUSINESS BRIEFLY 

RADIO IN 165 • Pharmaco Inc. (Feen-a-Mint 
and Chooz), Kenil worth, N. L, planning radio 
spot announcement campaign using daytime 
minutes in about 165 markets, starting Sept. 
17. Contract runs from 26 to 34 weeks de- 
pending on market. Doherty, Clifford, Steers 
& Shenfield, N. Y., is agency. 

TIME FOR HALO • Colgate-Palmolive Co. 
(Halo shampoo), N. Y., asking for radio and 
television availabilities starting July 31 to run 
through end of year. Approximately five to 15 
announcements weekly will be used in each 
market. Nearly 100 radio and 70 television 
stations will be used for campaign. Carl S. 
Brown, N. Y., is agency. 

NEXT TO MICKEY • Hassenfield Brothers 
(novelties manufacturer), Central Falls, R. I., 
buying chain breaks next to Mickey Mouse 
Club on number of ABC-TV stations, to start 
early in September and run to Christmas. Bo 
Bernstein, Providence, is agency. 

POLITICAL TV • Alliance Tennarotor (rotat- 
ing antenna for television sets), Alliance, Ohio, 
considering tv spot announcement campaign to 
start in August on stations carrying political 
coverage of conventions and election. Fuller & 
Smith & Ross, Cleveland, is agency. 

CLOTHES BUY • Howard Clothes, N. Y., to 
use three-week spot saturation campaign on 13 
radio stations in New York, Philadelphia, Chi- 
cago and Boston, starting July 15. Agency: 
Peck Adv., N. Y. 

CANDIDATE LOOKING • Pennsylvania 
Democratic Committee, for candidate Joe 
Clark's U. S. senatorial race, looking for five, 
ten and fifteen-minute periods in television 
throughout Pennsylvania, to start Sept. 17 and 
run through Nov. 5. Group is interested basic- 
ally in weather and news shows and women's 
participations in early and mid-evening. Radio 
and tv spots will also be used. Kastor, Farrell, 
Chesley & Clifford, N. Y., is agency. 



Committee Won't Subpoena 
N. W. Ayer, 'Post-Dispatch' 

NO SUBPOENAS will be issued against N. W. 
Ayer & Son, Philadelphia, or against St. Louis 
Post-Dispatch, Rep. Clarence Cannon (D-Mo.), 
chairman of House Appropriations Committee, 
announced Friday following voluntary appear- 
ance of Edward R. Dunning, executive vice 
president of advertising company. St. Louis 
newspaper refused to permit editorial writer to 
voluntarily appear. Committee was seeking in- 
formation on $100,000 one-shot newspaper 
campaign by group of private power companies 
regarding atomic energy development and back- 
ground on Post-Dispatch editorial on same 
subject. 

Earlier in week, Rep. Frank T. Bow (R- 
Ohio), former WHBC Canton, Ohio, news- 
caster and general counsel for Cox committee 
which investigated FCC in early 40s, warned 
colleagues in House floor speech that commit- 
tee's action to issue subpoenas was "dangerous 
and unprecedented." He said he feared commit- 
tee's action "invaded the freedom of press" and 
was "political excursion." 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 7 



This group of experienced 
THEIR Meredith station executives 

meet regularly, sharing 
their ideas, their know-how. 



EXPERIENCE 



YOUR The result, their better broad- 

casting, better telecasting — 
and your better sales results. 



SALES RESULTS 




SYRACUSE 



V\Wl 
H Hi 



PHOENIX 



OMAHA 



P \ P 



RADIO \ TV 

620 kc. \ Channel £ 
CSS \ CBS 



E ml 



o o 



RADIO 

91 kc. 
ABC 




TV 

Channel 5 



Represented by K A T 2 AGENCY INC 



RADIO \ TV 

590 kc. \ Channel 6 

JOHN BLAIR & CO BLAIR TV, INC. 



ER EDITH 'Radio W IdevOiio* STATIONS 

affiliated with Better Homes and Gardens and Successful Farming magazines 



Page 8 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



PEOPLE 



Peoria, Springfield, Raleigh 
Tv Grants Issued by FCC 

FCC issued three final tv decisions Friday — 
granting ch. 8, Peoria, 111., to WIRL there; ch. 
2 Springfield, 111., to WMAY-TV Inc., and 
ch. 5 Raleigh, N. C, to WRAL there. 

Peoria and Springfield grants forbade con- 
struction until outcome of pending deintermix- 
ture proceedings in those two cities (see alloca- 
tions story, page 27). 

Grant to WIRL Peoria sustained examiner's 
decision, was made on preferences given that 
station for local ownership, civic participation 
of principals, diversification of business inter- 
ests of principals, integration of ownership and 
management and diversification of media of 
mass communications. WIRL owned by Tim- 
othy W. Swain and lohn H. and Edward J. 
Altorfer. Losing applicant WMDB Peoria 
owned by Charles C. Caley, 66%%, and John 
E. Fetzer, 33 V3 % , who have other radio and tv 
interests. 

Reversing examiner in grant to WMAY Tv 
Inc. in Springfield, FCC found it to be preferred 
on grounds of broadcast experience of owners 
and integration of ownership and management. 
WMAY Tv Inc. owned 50% by WMAY that 
city and 28.5% by Lee Ruwitch (WTVJ [TV] 
Miami, Fla.). Losing applicant Sangamon Val- 
ley Tv Corp. is 40% owned by WTAX Spring- 
field. 

Sustaining examiner's initial decision, grant 



at deadline 



FAST FASHIONS 

IN WHAT was termed "another example 
of the importance of television as a news 
medium," Peter Pan Foundations Inc. 
(bras and girdles), New York, announced 
it will sponsor Paris Fashion Preview on 
ABC-TV Aug. 29 (3:30-4 p.m. EDT) on 
same day that news of new Paris fall- 
winter fashions are carried in newspapers 
and magazines. Agency is Ben Sackheim, 
New York. 

Peter Pan spokesman added that Peter 
Pan sponsorship marks first use of net- 
work tv on major scale. He estimated 
that cost of filming fashions, plus expend- 
itures for time and talent, would run to 
about $100,000. 



to WRAL in Raleigh was predicated on integra- 
tion of ownership and management, diversifica- 
tion of business interests of principals and 
diversification of ownership of media of com- 
munications. In latter Commission accepted 
examiner's reasoning which held that WRAL 
should be preferred because it would give that 
station dominant tv station in Raleigh, leaving 
competitor WPTF with dominant radio station. 
Raleigh News & Observer, dominant printed 
media, owns 14% of WNAO-AM-FM-TV 
Raleigh (ch. 28). WRAL is owned by A. J. 
Fletcher and family. 



ELDON E. SMITH, vice president, Young & 
Rubicam, appointed manager of Chicago office. 
He has been manager of merchandising depart- 
ment and member of agency's plans board in 
New York since 1953. 

JOHN BROOKMAN, former vice president and 
manager of Ruthrauff & Ryan's Toronto office 
(recently closed), to BBDO, same city, as senior 
account executive. 

NORMAN BAER, director of radio and televi- 
sion, Hilton & Riggio, N. Y., to Lewin, Wil- 
liams & Saylor Inc. in same capacity. 

W. SCOTT LEONARD, formerly vice president 
and account supervisor at Young & Rubicam, 
Chicago, and with agency past eight years, to 
J. Walter Thompson Co., same city, as account 
representative effective today (Mon.), ROBERT 
D. DOHN, formerly art director at Foote, Cone 
& Belding, Chicago, to Thompson in similar 
capacity, and BETTY STUART SMITH, direc- 
tor of radio-tv publicity for all agency accounts 
in New York, transferred to Thompson in Chi- 
cago as copywriter on Kraft Foods account. 

MILTON PICKMAN, production assistant to 
Jerry Wald at Columbia Pictures, Hollywood, 
appointed vice president in charge of program- 
ming for Briskin Productions Inc., Hollywood, 
which supervises production for Screen Gems 
Inc., tv film production and distribution sub- 
sidiary of Columbia Pictures. 

ROBERT H. HARTER appointed sales man- 
ager of Central Broadcasting Co. (WHO-AM- 
TV Des Moines, Iowa). 

JAMES T. WELLS JR., formerly copy super- 
visor on RCA-Victor records and other ac- 
counts at Grey Adv. Agency, N. Y.. to copy 
staff of Needham, Louis & Brorby, same city. 



AAAA Names Top Officers 
For 1956 Committee Duties 

APPOINTMENT of chairmen and vice chair- 
men of six committees and nine standing com- 
mittees to serve for year ending next May 31 
announced by American Assn. of Advertising 
Agencies' board include renaming of Frank G. 
Silvernail of BBDO, N. Y., as chairman, and 
Jane Daly of Earle Ludgin, Chicago, as vice 
chairman of broadcast media unit. Also re- 
named: John F. Devine of J. Walter Thompson 
Co., N. Y., as chairman, and C. Burt Oliver 
of Foote, Cone & Belding, Hollywood, as vice 
chairman of television and radio administration 
committee. Both broadcast media and tv-radio 
administration are standing committees. 

Named to six committees from among AAAA 
directors-at-large were these chairmen and vice 
chairmen: 

Advertiser relations: chairman, Harry Hard- 
ing of Young & Rubicam, N. Y.; vice chair- 
man, William A. Marsteller (reappointment) 
of Marsteller, Rickard, Gebhardt & Reed, Chi- 
cago; agency administration: chairman, Bryan 
Houston of Bryan Houston, N. Y.; vice chair- 
man, Larry Wherry of Wherry, Baker & Tilden, 
Chicago; agency personnel: chairman, Joseph 
H. Epstein (reappointment) of Fitzgerald Adv., 
New Orleans; vice chairman, Henry C. Flower 
Jr. of J. Walter Thompson Co., N. Y.; govern- 
ment, public and educator relations: chairman, 
Robert M. Ganger (reappointment) of D'Arcy 
Adv., N. Y.; vice chairman, Otto Kleppner of 
Kleppner Co., N. Y.; improvement of advertis- 
ing content: chairman, Arthur E. Tatham (re- 
appointment) of Tatham-Laird, Chicago; vice 
chairman, Edwin Cox (reappointment) of Ken- 
yon & Eckhardt, N. Y.; media relations: chair- 



man, Emerson Foote of McCann-Erickson, 
N. Y.; vice chairman, Peter G. Levathes (re- 
appointment) of Young & Rubicam, N. Y. 

Designated to other seven standing commit- 
tees were following: 

Business publications: chairman. C. E. Liv- 
ingston of Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove, Pitts- 
burgh; vice chairman, Fred Wittner of Fred 
Wittner Adv., N. Y.; international advertising: 
chairman, Vincent Tutching of McCann-Erick- 
son, N. Y.; vice chairman, W. A. Weaver of 
Griswold-Eshleman Co., Cleveland; magazines 
and farm papers: chairman, William E. Steers 
(reappointment) of Doherty. Clifford, Steers & 
Shenfield, N. Y.; vice chairman, E. W. Froelich 
(reappointment) of MacManus, John & Adams, 
Bloomfield Hills, Mich.; mechanical produc- 
tion: chairman, Erwin A. Miessler (reappoint- 
ment) of Needham, Louis & Brorby, Chicago; 
vice chairman, Milton J. Sutter (reappointment) 
of Cunningham & Walsh, N. Y.; newspapers: 
chairman, Daniel M. Gordon of Ruthrauff & 
Ryan, N. Y.; vice chairman, Robert F. Hussey 
of Foote, Cone & Belding, Chicago; outdoor 
and transportation advertising: chairman, J. J. 
Hartigan (reappointment) of Campbell-Ewald 
Co., Detroit; vice chairman, W. F. MacDonald 
(reappointment) of Kudner Agency, N. Y.; 
research: chairman, D. E. Robinson (reappoint- 
ment) of C. J. LaRoche & Co., N. Y.; vice 
chairman, Edward Battey (reappointment) of 
Compton Adv., N. Y. 

Hauser Seeks Eureka Ch. 13 

APPLICATION for ch. 13 at Eureka, Calif, 
(with studio at Humboldt), filed with FCC Fri- 
day by Carroll R. Hauser, owner of KHUM 
Eureka and 45% -owner of KVEN Ventura, 
Calif. 



Poller Would Buy WOPT (TV) 
As Subscription Tv Station 

APPLICATION to purchase ch. 44 WOPT 
(TV) Chicago, provided FCC will allow station 
to be operated on parttime subscription-tv basis, 
was filed with Commission Friday by Lou 
Poller, who early last month asked FCC to 
authorize pay-tv operation for his ch. 25 
WCAN-TV Milwaukee [B«T, June 18]. 

Purchase of WOPT from WOPA Inc., en- 
tailed no cash and did not involve WOPA-AM- 
FM. If FCC approves purchase (this assumes 
approval of pay-tv plan), Poller firm (Tv Ex- 
hibitors of America) would issue WOPA Inc. 
7Vi % of non-voting, Class B stock in WOPT, 
according to application. 

Proposed Chicago fee-tv operation would be 
similar to that envisioned for Milwaukee with 
25% paid, 75% normal operation. 

Right Once, Sindlinger 
Again Predicts Sunday Duel 

SUBSTANTIATING prediction of Sindlinger 
& Co. that Steve Allen's first telecast opposite 
Ed Sullivan (June 24) would fail to attract half 
as many viewers as Sullivan [B*T, June 25], 
Sindlinger interviewers early last week found 
actual viewing in ratio of 67.8% for Sullivan 
to 32.2% for Allen. Pulse rated Sullivan 35.3, 
Allen 15.1; Trendex, Sullivan 24.6, Allen 13.3. 
Sindlinger Thursday estimated that Allen's sec- 
ond telecast (yesterday), would reduce audience 
ratio to three-to-two, 59.4% or 42,025,000 
viewers for Sullivan, 40.6% or 28,766,000 for 
Allen. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 9 



the week in brief 



FCC CHARTS TV FUTURE 

Beginning with immediate deintermix- 
ture of 13 markets, Commission's long- 
range plan envisages eventual shift of 
all tv to uhf, if uhf performance can 

be raised to vhf level . ... .27 

Full text of FCC report 91 

MEDIA FACE GREATEST CHALLENGE 

Advertising media must keep retail sales 
going up as automation shifts burden 
of continued business expansion from 
production to distribution, Advertising 
Assn. of West convention hears . 29 

TV DRAWS AUTO PROSPECTS 

Dealers and customers agree that tele- 
vision does best job of any medium in 
luring people into automobile show- 
rooms, studies by ABC-TV and TvB 
reveal 35 

PRODUCERS SUE REVLON 

Broadway producers charge cosmetic 
firm with depriving them of services of 
Hal March, $64,000 Question m.c, for 
play scheduled for fall production 42 

ARF PLANS TV SET REPORT 

$17,000 study, financed by the tv net- 
works, NARTB and TvB, will com- 
bine Census and Nielsen data to give 
county-by-county estimate of tv fami- 
lies for February 1956, Advertising Re- 
search Foundation announces 46 

NTA FILM NETWORK 

National Telefilm Assoc. film net- 
work, to start in October, already has 
50 affiliated stations, NTA President 
Ely A. Landau reports 56 

TELEPROMPTER NETWORK NEARER 

Leading station operators join com- 
mittee to help launch nationwide, pri- 
vately-owned wire communications net- 
work for broadcasting industry . . . .58 



departments 

Advertisers & Agencies 29 

At Deadline 7 

Awards 80 

Closed Circuit 5 

Colorcasting 46 

Editorials 110 

Education 82 

Film 56 

For the Record 99 



HOUSE PROBES NBC-WBC SWAP 

Exchange of NBC's radio-tv properties 
in Cleveland for those of W estinghouse 
Broadcasting Co. in Philadelphia gets 
close scrutiny by House Antitrust Sub- 
committee 60 

NO NEW RULES SEEN FOR TV 

Kenneth Cox, special counsel to Senate 
Commerce Committee, tells AT AS that 
no new regulations of television are 
being sought now, but warns that Con- 
gress will watch closely for signs of 
"abuses" 66 

RADIO STATION GROUP INDICTED 

Federal grand jury indicts the Philadel- 
phia Radio & Television Broadcasters 
Assn., 10 Philadelphia radio stations 
and nine station officers on charges 
of illegal fixing of station rates . . .67 

COURT STAYS READ EXPULSION 

Leader of AFM Hollywood Local 47 
revolt against union's trust fund poli- 
cies gets court order staying his ex- 
pulsion 72 

MBS OUTLETS LIKE NEW PACT 

Two-week series of regional meetings 
show plan generally accepted, Mutual 
officials say, although some stations 
expected to leave network 74 

AAW PRESENTS AWARDS 

Southern Pacific radio jingle and 
Chevrolet tv spot win top honors in 
annual competition of Advertising 
Assn. of West 80 

TELESTATUS 

B»T's monthly report of tv stations, 
operating and proposed, listed by city 
and state, with network, representative, 
base rate, colorcasting equipment and 
estimated sets in coverage area . . . .83 



Government . 60 

In Public Interest 100 

In Review 14 

International 81 

Lead Story 27 

Manufacturing 79 

Networks 74 

On All Accounts 24 

Open Mike 18 



Our Respects 20 

Personnel Relations . . 72 

Playback 72 

Professional Services . 73 

Program Services . . 58 

Programs & Promotion 98 

Stations 67 

Telestatus 83 

Trade Assns 77 



Broadcasting Publications Inc. 

Sol Taishoff 
President 



Maury Long 
Vice President 



H. H. Tash 
Secretary 



B. T. Taishoff 
Treasurer 




Page 10 



July 2, 1956 



LECASTING 



THE NEWSWEEKLY OF RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Published Every Monday by Broadcasting 
Publications Inc. 

Executive and Publication Headquarters 
Broadcasting * Telecasting Bldg. 
1735 DeSales St., N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 
Telephone: MEtropolitan 8-1022 
EDITOR & PUBLISHER: Sol Taishoff 
MANAGING EDITOR: Edwin H. James 
SENIOR EDITORS: Rufus Crater (New York), J. 

Frank Beatty, Bruce Robertson 
NEWS EDITOR: Fred Fitzgerald 
SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR: David Glickman 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Earl B. Abrams, Lawrence 

Christopher (Hollywood) 
ASST. TO MANAGING EDITOR: Donald V. West 
ASSISTANT EDITOR: Harold Hopkins 
STAFF WRITERS: Ray Ahearn, Jacqueline Eagle, 
Dawson Nail, Munsey Slack, Lamar Underwood 
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS: Hilma Blair, John Sheldon, 

Ann Tasseff 
SECRETARY TO THE PUBLISHER: Gladys L. Hall 

BUSINESS 

VICE PRESIDENT & GENERAL MANAGER: Maury Long 
SALES MANAGER: Winfield R. Levi (New York) 
SOUTHERN SALES MANAGER: Ed Sellers 
PRODUCTION MANAGER: George L. Dant 
TRAFFIC MANAGER: Harry Stevens 
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: Wilson D. McCarthy 
ADVERTISING ASSISTANTS: M. Gwen Moore, Jessie 
Young 

AUDITOR-OFFICE MANAGER: Irving C. Miller 
ASSISTANT AUDITOR: Eunice Weston 
SECRETARY TO GENERAL MANAGER: Eleanor Schadi 
ART-LAYOUT: Duane McKenna 

CIRCULATION & READER'S SERVICE 

MANAGER: John P. Cosgrove 
SUBSCRIPTION MANAGER: Frank N. Gentile 
CIRCULATION ASSISTANTS: Norma Wooton, Barbara 

Seabrooke, Joseph Rizzo, Charles Harpold, 

Frank McCully 

BUREAUS 

NEW YORK 
444 Madison Ave., Zone 22, PLaza 5-8355 

Editorial 

SENIOR EDITOR: Rufus Crater 
AGENCY EDITOR: Florence Small 
ASST. NEW YORK EDITOR: David W. Berlyn 
NEW YORK FEATURES EDITOR: Rocco Famighetti 
STAFF WRITERS: Frank P. Model, Selma Gersten, 
Beverly Berl 

Business 

SALES MANAGER: Winfield R. Levi 
SALES SERVICE MANAGER: Eleanor R. Manning 
EASTERN SALES MANAGER: Kenneth Cowan 
ADVERTISING ASSISTANT: Donna Trolinger 

CHICAGO 

360 N. Michigan Ave., Zone 1, CEntral 6-4115 
MIDWEST NEWS EDITOR: John Osbon 
MIDWEST SALES MANAGER: Warren W. Middleton, 
Barbara Kolar 

HOLLYWOOD 
6253 Hollywood Blvd., Zone 28, Hollywood 3-8181 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Lawrence Christopher 
WESTERN SALES MANAGER: Bill Merritt, Virginia 
Bialas 

Toronto, 32 Colin Ave., HUdson 9-2694 

James Montagnes 

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION 
Annual subscription for 52 weekly issues: $7.00. Annual 
lubscription including BROADCASTING Yearbook (53d 
Issue): $9.00, or TELECASTING Yearbook (54th issue): 
$9.00. Annual subscription to BROADCASTING • TELE- 
CASTING, Including 54 issues: $11.00. Add $1.00 per 
year for Canadian and foreign postage. Regular Issues: 
35* per copy; 53d and 54th issues: $3.00 per copy. 
ADDRESS CHANGE: Please send requests to Circulation 
Dept., BROADCASTING • TELECASTING, 1735 DeSales St.. 
N.W., Washington 6, D. C. Give both old and new 
addresses, including postal zone numbers. Post office 
will not forward issues. 

BROADCASTING* Magazine was founded in 1931 by 
Broadcasting Publications Inc., using the title: BROAD- 
CASTING* — The News Magazine of the Fifth Estate. 
Broadcast Advertising* was acquired in 1932, Broadcast 
Reporter In 1933 and Telecast* in 1953. 

•Reg. U. S. Patent Office 
Copyright 1956 by Broadcasting Publications Inc. 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 




WOOD 



LAND 



-TV 




Here's the business end of a high-powered motoring market you may be 
missing . . . currently wheeling along at the rate of $514-million for gas, 
oil and automotive products. Western Michigan motorists are YOURS . . . 
when you buy WOOD-TV, Grand Rapids' only television station . . . the 
country's 18th television market. Ask us to tell you more! 



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GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 




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GRANDWOOD BROADCASTING COMPANY • NBC BASIC: ABC SUPPLEMENTARY • ASSOCIATES: WFBM-AM 
AND TV. INDIANAPOLIS: WFDF, FLINT; WTCN-AM AND TV. MINNEAPOLIS • REPRESENTED BY K AT Z AGENCY 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 195') • Page 11 





I * 






wJm 




■ 






wwi 



TV 




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The sun — the water — and the world's most beautiful beaches still remain the Miami 
Area's greatest commodity, and the Great American Tourist, its leading customer. 
Present hotels showed an average season occupancy of 93.3%, and some $40 million 
will be invested this year in new tourist facilities. Summer vacations are establishing 



remarkable new records. One airline experienced an 85% increase between April 15 
and June 1 in package-vacation tours alone, while another predicts a 40% increase in all 
Miami trips during balance of summer. Railroads and bus lines are scheduling special 
trains and trips to carry greatly increased summer loads, greatest in Miami's history. 



The beautiful Miami skyline is familiar to most of the nation, but behind this 
lovely scene is an important industrial boom. The county now ranks first in 
Florida in industrial production, and a total of some $316 million in new projects 
(cement plants, aircraft industries, etc.) will solidify that position. 



While Florida's farm economy has been somewhat obscured by vacationland 
and industrial publicity, agriculture is an area of vast importance. The cattle 
industry ranks second in the nation, and the economic value to Dade County 
( Miami) of all farming interests is in excess of $75 million per year. 



Deep channel port facilities bring ocean vessels (and voyagers) virtually 
to the center of Miami's downtown area, and cruise ships add their 
facilities to a greatly expanded transportation system. 



The University of Miami, possibly the nation's most modern, is Florida's 
largest with an enrollment of 11,077. The recent establishment of the 
state's first medical school at the University has provided added prestige. 



114 MOVED IN TODAY 



Every day is "moving-in" day in Greater Miami. 42,000 
new permanent residents in each of the past five years have 
stimulated phenomenal residential construction, and new- 
record tourist seasons keep hotel-motel construction at 
an equally high peak. 

1956 public school enrollment increased 12.2% over 
1955 and a $34 million bond issue will provide over 1,000 
additional classrooms for next year's crop of youngsters. 

Greater Miami is enjoying an increased earning 
power generated by 249,000 non-agricultural jobs, while 
all-important retail sales moved up to a new level of over 
a billion dollars in '55 (a gain of 15.2% over 1954 against 
a national gain for the same periods of only 9.3%). 
"Effective Buying Income" is measured at over $134 bil- 
lion by Sales Management Magazine ($6,047 per family) 



in a population area of 744,000 as of January 1,1956. 

Federal Reserve "Bank Debits," a reliable business 
yardstick, soared to a new high of over $6M billion in '55, 
a healthy 22.8% increase over '54 — and a remarkable 
265% over '45. 

Serving this booming Florida market are two Storer 
Broadcasting Company stations: WGBS, a 50 kw CBS 
Network (radio) affiliate, and WGBS-TV. Both stations 
are enjoying new peaks in audiences and the widest cover- 
age in their respective fields. A strong merchandising 
service keeps pace with the rapidly expanding retail store 
development. Like all Storer stations, program policies of 
both WGBS and WGBS-TV make them "local stations," 
while maximum power guarantees best reception through- 
out the entire Greater Miami area. 



STORER 
BROADCAJ 
COMPANY 




WSPD 


WJW 


WJBK 


WAGA 


WBRC 


WWVA WGBS 


Toledo, Ohio 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Detroit, Michigan 


Atlanta, Georgia 


Birmingham, Alabama 


Wheeling, W. Virginia Miami, Florida 


WSPD-TV 


WJW-TV 


WJBK-TV 


WAGA-TV 


WBRC-TV 


KPTV WGBS-TV 


Toledo, Ohio 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Detroit, Michigan 


Atlanta, Georgia 


3irmingham, Alabama 


Portland, Oregon Miami, Florida 



SALES OFFICES 



TOM HARKER — vice-president and national sales director 



118 East 57th Street, New York 22 • Murray Hill 8-8630 



BOB WOOD — national sales manager 
LEW JOHNSON — midwest sales manager • 230 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1 • Franklin 2-6498 
GAYLE GRUBB — vice-president and Pacific coast sales manager • 111 Sutter Street, San Francisco • Sutter 1-8689 



CAPITAL TYPES #31 






THE HORSEWOMAN 

Noted for her firm seat 
and fixed grin; hates ani- 
mals and high places but 
grew up with the motto 
"Never Say Die"onher bed- 
room wall. Proud of the 
Gi ddings-Robs j ohn f ami ly 
tradition. Friends call 
her "Yoicks," refer to her 
intimates as"stablemates." 
Fond of down cushions and 
Chanel /5. Passionate 
about needlepoint, has 
drawer full of antimacas- 
sars crocheted in secret. 

But Washington advertis- 
ers are keeping no se- 
crets when they advertise 
on WTOP Radio, f TOP gives 
them(l) the largest aver- 
age share of audience (2) 
the most quarter-hour wins 
( 3 ) Washington's most popu- 
lar personalities and (4) 
ten times the power of any 
other radio station in the 
Washington area. 

WTOP RADIO 

Operated by The Washington Post Broadcast 
Division* Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 

Page 14 • July 2, 1956 



IN REVIEW 



HAPPY BIRTHDAY 

THOSE GREMLINS who played such a big 
part in last season's "Alice in Wonderland" 
(Hallmark Hall of Fame) were back again last 
Monday night, stealing the show from the cast 
of "Happy Birthday" with such electronic 
effects as oscillating furniture, translucent liquor 
bottles, gurgling sound-effects, superimposed 
glassware and whatever else NBC-TV's sleight 
o' hands boys could muster in the way of dis- 
tractions. It was like taking candy from a baby, 
considering that the storyline of Anita Loos' 
play is and always has been incredibly complex 
and downright silly most of the time. 

If the play wasn't "the thing," it probably 
was the idea of bringing to tv this Decameron 
night in a Newark tavern. The decision to do 
it must have been somewhat hard for the net- 
work and agency, beseiged as they are, by two 
opposing audience factions: the one demanding 
more sophisticated, mature tv; the other calling 
for more "wholesome American family enter- 
tainment." 

Though the attractive Betty Field was handi- 
capped by too-appealing looks and clothes to 
be a prissy old maid, she still managed to im- 
press us as a frustrated dumpling having the 
time of her life on, under or astride the bar. 
Her performance was satisfactorily comple- 
mented by the colorcasting and the work of her 
supporting cast, notably, Barry Nelson, Enid 
Markey, Tina Louise, Bill Harrigan and Luella 
Gear. 

Production costs: $140,000. 

Sponsored by Ford Motor Co. and RCA Victor 
through Kenyon & Eckhardt Inc., June 25, on 
Producer's Showcase, on NBC-TV in color 
and black-and-white every fourth Monday, 
8-9:30 p.m. EDT. 

Producer-director: Alex Segal; associate pro- 
ducer: Andrew McCullough; associate direc- 
tor: Dean Whitmore; author: Anita Loos; 
tv adaptor: Robert Wallsten; musical director: 
George Bassman; settings: Otis Riggs; techni- 
cal director: Jack Coffey; production assistant: 
Edith Hamlin. 

CBS CARTOON THEATRE 

AS LIGHT (and lightweight) summer fare, 
CBS-TV's newest venture into cartoonland is 
not likely to create any stir around network 
quarters or any qualms in the Disneyland camp. 

Its June 20 CBS Cartoon Theatre offered 
viewers a group of Paul Terry cartoons, includ- 
ing Gandy Goose, Heckel and Jeckel, plus those 
two delightful hellions, Tom and Jerry, pieced 
together with pattern by Dick Van Dyke. He 
commented on the authenticity of historical 
characters, inserted a plug for The Adventures 
of Robin Hood (also a CBS-TV series) and gave 
water safety tips for the small fry. Mr. Van 
Dyke has a pleasant and smooth manner about 
him which, far from being condescending, ap- 
pears a bit too lofty for the juvenile audience. 

Slated opposite ABC-TV's full-hour Disney- 
land for the summer, Cartoon Theatre is not 
apt to win many viewers during the 7:30-8 p.m. 
slot, any more than Arthur Godfrey is during 
the second half of Disneyland. Nor is it likely 
to influence advertisers (Cartoon Theatre is 
aired on a limited CBS-TV network, sustain- 
ing). It's hard to envision it as a tv staple. 

This reviewer, an old Tom & Jerry fan, con- 
cedes that cartoons are popular, but isn't there 
a glut of them on tv already? And don't they 
belong on local stations instead of in prime 
network time? 

Production costs (gross): $25,000. 

Telecast June 20 by CBS-TV, 7:30-8 p.m. 

(EDT), sustaining. 
Announcer: Dick Van Dyke; producer: Michael 

Grilikhes; director: Howard Magwood; writer: 

Bill Dammie. 



THE STEVE ALLEN SHOW 

"THE SAME old thing" has no place in a 
Steve Allen format, as he has proved to nation- 
wide audiences for the past few years on the 
Tonight show. Now he's in the big time as 
time spots go — 8-9 p.m. Sunday — and as imag- 
inative as ever. 

Things got off to a properly informal start 
when the show opened on comic Jerry Lewis 
instead of Mr. Allen. Then the inevitable ap- 
pearance of Bob Hope to plug some movie (the 
name of which won't be mentioned here). 
Then some clever jibes at the opposing Ed 
Sullivan show. Then a bit of business where 
Steve played the piano while various scenes 
gave the viewer something to look at: a meat 
grinder, Skitch Henderson's head on a platter, 
etc. 

Hits of the show: The commercial parodies 
featuring "testimonials" by Dane Clark, Vin- 
cent Price and Wally Cox. Steve's routine with 
Kim Novak on "teaching while you entertain" 
television. The finale "Death of the Blues" 
duet with Steve and Sammy Davis Jr. 

Misses: The opening Davis Jr. routines. Not 
that they were bad, but Mr. Allen relinquished 
much too much time to the act. For a while 
it looked more like The Sammy Davis Jr. 
Show. 

Near miss: The rooftop ballet with Bambi 
Linn and Rod Alexander. It turned out to be 
interesting as novelty but poor as dance. 

Verdict: Results may not always be the most 
expert, but the show promises to be exciting. 

Production costs: Approximately $55,000. 

Sponsored on NBC-TV by Brown. & William- 
son Tobacco through Ted Bates & Co.; Avco 
Mfg. through Compton Adv.; Andrew Jer- 
gens through Robert W. Orr Assoc.; three 
out of four Sundays, 8-9 p.m. EDT. 

Executive producer: Jules Green; producer: 
Bill Harbach; director: Dwight Hemion; 
musical director: Skitch Henderson; an- 
nouncer: Gene Rayburn; NBC program su- 
pervisor: Alan Courtney; writers: Steve Al- 
len, Stan Burns and Herb Sargent; unit man- 
ager: Jim Reina. 

SEEN & HEARD 

To meet NBC-TV's new challenge to his su- 
premacy in the Sunday evening 8-9 period, Ed 
Sullivan on June 24 celebrated his eighth anni- 
versary with 45 guests, practically all stars 
whose names are top flight audience attractions. 
True, most of them appeared only to take bows 
and join in a chorus of "Happy Anniversary 
to You," but they were there, as promised. 
Moreover, unlike too many anniversary cele- 
brations, Mr. Sullivan and his producers did 
not neglect to have a show as well as greetings, 
with songs by Kate Smith, Teresa Brewer and 
Harry Belafonte, comedy by Jack Paar and — 
not forgetting his younger fans— a troupe of 
performing bears. In other words, it was just 
the type of show that has put Sullivan into 
his enviable position and we predict Steve 
Allen's going to have a tough time usurping 
his throne. 

Perhaps it's the heat that brought forth such 
talent last week in television. Whatever the 
cause, kudos are demanded for at least two of 
the week's performances: To Lorenzo Semple 
Jr., who wrote the script for Alcoa Hour's 
"The Archangel Harrigan," a delightful fantasy 
about an Irish rogue who woos a Scottish miss 
in rural America. To John Drainie, whose por- 
trayal of "Mr. Arcularis" in Monday's Studio 
One Summer Theatre production of the same 
name was both spellbinding and supremely 
professional. 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



Ready for lunch'? 



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nonstop. Another 700 miles will speed by between cocktails and 
dessert. Before you know it you've arrived at your destination — 
relaxed, composed. Ready for anything. 





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DC-7 nonstops from Chicago to Los Angeles, San Francisco and 
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AIR LINES 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 15 



STAMPS OF APPROVAL 



Advertisers are spending more dollars with the NBC Radio Network on weekends 



48 °/< 



than with any other network . . .\t more than with the second network. 



During its first year, MONITOR increased NBC Radio Network weekend reve- 



nues — in the face of a decline in weekend revenue on all other networks — by 



278 % 



o over the preceding year. 



MONITOR has moved steadily from 30% sold-out in the first quarter of 1956 to 



78°/ 



more than sold-out for this August. By next month, NBC Radio 



7,000,000 



will be delivering over I m\J\J v/^v/x/ \/more listener commercial 



impressions, weekends, than any other network. 



You belong on MONITOR, where advertisers have placed so many stamps of 

a PPOT .,NBC RADIO NETWORK 

a service of 




OPEN MIKE 



How Ayer Charges 



EDITOR: 

The article on the 15% commission in your 
issue of June 18 is very interesting and well 
written, but it is not up to date in regard to 
Ayer. 

It is true that, until 1949, we charged a com- 
mission of 16%% on the net cost to us of time, 
space and other commissionable expenses. But 
in 1949 we changed to a straight 15% of the 
gross cost of time and space, and 15% of other 
commissionable expenses. This brought our 
charges exactly into line with those of othei 
agencies, although in billing for space and time 
we use a formula which permits us to receive 
our compensation from our clients rather than 
from media. This is in accord with our long- 
standing policy of making sure that, both 
actually and legally, we are working for the 
advertiser. 

If you would like some background on the 
reason for our 1949 change, here it is: Our 
16%% of the net cost of space and time worked 
out as slightly less than the 15% of the gross 
charged by other agencies. Our 16%% of other 
commissionable charges was more than the 
charges made by other agencies. These differ- 
ences just about cancelled each other out until 
television, with its high production costs, be- 
came an important factor. At that point, in 
order to keep our charges in balance with 
charges made by other agencies, we dropped 
our policy of charging 16%% on the net and 
adopted the 15% system. 

Richard P. Powell, Vice President 

N. W. Ayer & Son Inc. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

What's Newsworthy? 

EDITOR: 

In your June 18 issue you have published 
a report from Troy Knowles of the Helene 
Curtis Industries. On the subject of "Free 
Plugs Supported, Says Cosmetic Company," 
Mr. Knowles was quoted as saying: "The ques- 
tion of free versus paid time assumes that the 
only thing newsworthy is on a commercial." 

This remark is almost too absurd to warrant 
an answer. Mr. Knowles, suppose you try get- 
ting your so called "free plugs" or newsworthy 
notes to the various news services which serve 
radio. I feel sure that such accounts as Wrig- 
ley chewing gum and Coca-Cola do not evalu- 
ate their fine commercial copy, which in some 
cases has remained unchanged for years, as 
newsworthy. They want to sell merchandise 
and are willing to pay for it . . . 

J. M. McDonald, Gen. Mgr. 
KURV Edinburg, Tex. 

Vincent Hartnett, Researcher 

EDITOR: 

In the article, "Faulk Sues AWARE for 
'Blacklisting,'" which appears on page 31 of 
the June 25 issue of your indispensable maga- 
zine, the following statement is attributed to 

me: 

"I am hired by agencies, sponsors and net- 
works to look into the qualifications of persons 
they plan to use on radio and tv programs. 
Following my investigation, I find and report 
on any political activity in which the person 
under examination may have participated." 

This is not an accurate quotation of what I 
said over the phone to your able reporter. I 
did not use the word, "investigation." I am not 
an investigator and have not the training or 
facilities to conduct investigations. I am a re- 
searcher. I have comprehensive files on com- 
munists and communist-fronters in the enter- 
tainment industry. What I said was that I 



"check" names proposed to me, to ascertain 
whether the individuals involved have or do 
not have records of affiliation of one kind or 
the other with the Communist Party or with 
communist "fronts" and causes. 

I did not use the phrase, "political activity." 
I am not concerned with individuals' political 
activity. I am concerned about whether they 
did or did not engage in communist or pro- 
communist activity. 

The statement attributed to me in direct 
quotes was inaccurate and might well be dam- 
aging to me in my profession. I would appre- 
ciate your making a prompt correction. 
Vincent W. Hartnett 
New York 

Jeweled Coach 

EDITOR: 

Mr. Mack [Larry Mack, Slenderella presi- 
dent] has read the article, "Radio: Jeweled 
Coach for Slenderella," in your June 4 issue 
and he has asked me to write and tell you how 
much he liked it. 

It is an excellent article, as evidenced by the 
many compliments we have received on it, and 
your interest and consideration are very much 
appreciated. 

Margareth Gibbs, Asst. to the Pres. 
Slenderella, International 
Stamford, Conn. 

Free Speech in Action 

EDITOR: 

On June 28 Santa Barbara radio station 
KIST will celebrate the second anniversary of 
its Free Speech program, which is unique in 
that [it affords listeners] free opportunity to 
[exercise that right]. By merely picking up the 
receiver at home, place of business or telephone 
booth and dialing Woodland 3981 at a given 
time, one is soon connected with a broadcasting 
medium whereby he or she is "on the air." 

Any person's views on public matters or 
officials, one's innermost thoughts or convic- 
tions, are permitted (within propriety) and 
expressed on this Free Speech program. Par- 
ticipants include hundreds of citizens who have 
spoken, many more than once . . . 

Through the medium of this valuable pro- 
gram citizens have influenced public affairs in 
Santa Barbara City and County, as well as Cali- 
fornia State, as follows: 

( 1 ) A long overdue special election for state 
senator in Santa Barbara County and vicinity, 
being thoroughly publicized on the program by 
citizens in 1955, had much to do with forcing 
Gov. Goodwin J. Knight to obey the state 
constitution by calling this election. 

(2) Free Speech was a large factor in Santa 
Barbara City whereby a majority of its speak- 
ers on the matter of a public golf course fa- 
vored same and a bond issue for this purpose 
was approved by the voters. 

(3) Discussions on traffic conditions, street 
improvements, education, taxes, city depart- 
ments and the general welfare of the people 
socially, culturally and at business and work 
have created much public interest and practical 
results. 

Free Speech is also a public forum — a meet- 
ing of the minds, so to speak. Controversial 
issues dealing with national and international 
affairs — with matters legal, moral, practical 
and ethical — of everyday living, have been 
presented and discussed pro and con. 

Harry C. Butcher, owner of KIST and origi- 
nator of the Free Speech program, his staff 
and moderators, are all to be congratulated on 
its moral success and achievements . . . 
Irving Polstein (a listener) 
Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Page 18 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 







While the nation's harried, 
about-to-be-married 
No. 1 glamour girl* 
tried to give photographers the slip, 
United Press Newspictures' 
Joseph J. Gazdak made this shot. 



*Marilyn Monroe, of course. 



I 




United Press 

NEWSPICTURES 
Tell the Story 




CASE HISTORY -WOMEN'S WEAR 




Sally is 18 this year. A beautiful 
and healthy 18, thanks largely to 
the good nutrition of Southern Cal- 
ifornia Radio. 

Since 1938 the Sally Shops have 
been a family enterprise of the 
Zuckermans; Ted and Marvin and 
their father, H. Lew. Their object: 
bring high fashion to the South- 
land at popular prices. Their meth- 
od: take the stores to the women 
in their residential neighborhoods. 

Foreseeing both the growth and the 
decentralization of Los Angeles, 
Sally harnessed the giant of adver- 
tising media, Radio, to carry the 
bulk of advertising. Morning news- 
casts and a half-dozen weekend 
five-minute programs are on KBIG. 
Spots are run on two other fine Los 
Angeles independents. 

Results? Sally Shops have grown 
from one small store to beautiful, 
modern fashion centers in 15 com- 
munities in Los Angeles, Ventura 
and San Bernardino Counties. 
Sales have increased substantially 
every year. 

Says John Bainbridge, account ex- 
ecutive, The Lansdale Company Ad- 
vertising Agency: "Radio has been 
our indispensable tool in making 
Sally's the 'Most Walked about 
Clothes in Town' ... by making 
them the 'Most Talked About'!" 

Huge, sprawling, rich Southern 
California is reached best by radio : 
KBIG RADIO, for greatest cover- 
age at lowest cost-per-thousand. 




JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 Sunset Blvd.. Los Angeles 28, California 

Telephone: Hollywood 3-3205 

Nat. Rep. WEED and Company 



our respects 



to ROBERT WILFRED CARPENTER 



ALTHOUGH he had no particular affinity for 
driving an ice truck, Robert W. Carpenter, 
vice president in charge of station relations for 
MBS, had reason to believe as a youth that the 
feeling wasn't mutual — insofar as the ice truck 
was concerned. 

Twice during his career Mr. Carpenter 
guided such a vehicle on New Jersey highways 
because of the press of economic circum- 
stances. Today, as he busily criss-crosses the 
country several times a year attempting to keep 
some 500-odd Mutual affiliates happy, Mr. 
Carpenter can look backward and comment 
wryly: "You can't beat those regular hours on 
the truck!" Mr. Carpenter's arduous schedule 
as station "trouble-shooter" for the world's 
largest network might faze an individual with 
a less formidable basic training in hard work. 

Robert Wilfred Carpenter was born in Eliza- 
beth, N. J., on Sept. 30, 1909, one of six boys 
in a family that believed all youngsters should 
perform household chores. He grew up in 
Roselle Park, N. J., and was graduated from 
the local high school in 1928. 

Though Mr. Carpenter had set his sights on 
a college education, he had to defer his plans 
for lack of funds. He decided to work for a 
while, save some money and enter college at 
a later date. It was at this point that Mr. Car- 
penter had his experience in hauling ice. . 

Some months later, he switched to a factory 
job at the Western Electric Co. in Kearney, 
N. J., and later to one at the Ford Motor Co. 
plant in Edgewater, N. J. The arrival of 
the depression shattered Mr. Carpenter's hopes 
of attending college, and in the next four years, 
he worked at several jobs, including a second 
tour on the ice truck. 

Early in 1934, a friend tipped off Mr. Car- 
penter to a job opportunity that held promise 
of broadening his occupational vista: CBS was 
going to have an opening in its accounting de- 
partment in three months. Undismayed by his 
lack of background in accounting, Mr. Carpen- 
ter enrolled for a short course in accounting 
in the night division of the Drake Business Col- 
lege in Elizabeth. Armed with two months' 
worth of knowledge in accounting, he arranged 
for an interview for the job at CBS. He was 
hired by Samuel R. Dean, currently treasurer 
of CBS, as a clerk on the accounting staff. 

At CBS he displayed a penchant for figures 
as well as for administration. Three years after 
joining the network, he was promoted to comp- 
troller of WBT Charlotte, N. C, then a CBS- 
owned station. In 1940, he was moved to St. 
Louis as comptroller of KNOX, and in 1941, 
he was appointed account executive. 

In 1943, Mr. Carpenter responded to the war 
effort by joining the American Red Cross as 
an assistant field director. He served in various 
localities throughout the country and later was 




assigned to Morocco and Marseilles. 

At the end of the war, Mr. Carpenter re- 
turned to the U. S. and accepted an offer from 
Mutual in 1945 as southwestern manager of 
the station relations department in Oklahoma 
City. Three years later, Mr. Carpenter was 
advanced to eastern manager of the depart- 
ment, with headquarters in New York, and in 

1953 was named assistant director of station 
relations. He was appointed director in March 

1954 and last April was elevated to vice presi- 
dent in charge of station relations. 

As a veteran station relations official, Mr. 
Carpenter has come to know intimately the 
managers of the stations affiliated with Mutual. 
He estimates he spends about a third of his 
working time on the road, conferring with sta- 
tion executives on their problems and receiving 
suggestions from them on the ways Mutual can 
better serve its affiliates. 

"We've gone up and down the land, asking 
our affiliates what they want from the net- 
works," Mr. Carpenter explained. "Though the 
answers have been different, one pattern has 
emerged. We've found out that radio stations 
want these things from networks: news pro- 
grams — not spot news — but commentary and 
interpretation; good special events coverage; 
good national sports coverage; some "who- 
dunits" and drama. If that's what they want, 
that's what they'll get. Whether they pay us in 
dollars or oranges or time makes no difference." 

Mr. Carpenter's comment about payment re- 
ferred to Mutual's new affiliation contract [B»T, 
April 1 6], under which network option time was 
reduced from nine hours a day to an average 
of five hours a day. Affiliates were asked to 
"pre-clear" and carry without compensation 
some 16 hours of network programming a week 
in return for about 15 hours of programming, 
furnished free to the local station for local sales. 
Mr. Carpenter commented that the old contract 
form was "obsolete" and the new plan, which 
goes into effect on Nov. 1, is a blue-print that 
should work to the advantages of both the net- 
work and its affiliates. 

In 1933, Mr. Carpenter was active in amateur 
theatricals in Roselle Park, and appeared in a 
play opposite a young lady named Isabelle 
Struthers. Two years later they were married. 
The Carpenters, who live in Old Greenwich, 
Conn., have three children — Barbara, 20, a 
junior at the U. of Connecticut at Storrs, who 
recently was elected "Campus Queen" and presi- 
dent of the Women's Student Government Coun- 
cil; Robert, 17, and Heather, 15, both students 
at Greenwich High School. 

Mr. Carpenter is an avid reader. Though he 
prefers non-fiction books, he will read "prac- 
tically anything I find" in a hotel when he is on 
a business trip. He lists his hobbies as: work, 
golf, fishing, cabinet-making and bowling. 



Page 20 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 










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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 21 




Who Does the Traveling -- Editors 



J. Frank Beatry: Ubiquitous. 

Roving assignments for B»T in past year took 
him 36,650 miles, had him inhaling the attar 
of gasoline in Texas, dodging flying chips in 
a High Sierra lumber mill, sampling Tillamook 
cheese, gaping at Wilson Dam turbines, eat- 
ing scrod in Boston, abalone on Catalina Is- 
land, Olympia oysters on Puget Sound and 
swordfish in Miami. Aside from a fondness 
for sea food and no air sickness, Frank boasts 
a well-traveled Swiss typewriter which may 
well symbolize B»T's editorial approach: Get 
it first hand and get it all. 



A 



radio-television trade magazine may be judged by the type of staffer 
who hits the road. Is he out selling advertising or is he out getting a story? 
Some books need only a scissors and paste-pot to "cover" the country; an edi- 
torial expense account for travel might include a couple of cross-town taxi 
fares, while the business of space selling uses 95% of their travel budget. 




*< a w*otY °l the c 




D 



on't get us wrong— there's noth- 
ing wrong with travel for space- 
selling. It's an essential part of the 
business of publishing a magazine. Our 
point is one of balance. 

Here at B*T our editors and reporters 
do plenty of traveling. Take Senior 
Editor J. Frank Beatty for example. He 
has traveled 36,650 miles in the past 
vear, making market studies in the 
Carolinas, the Gulf States, the Pacific 
Northwest, covering national advertiser 
meetings, digging into the impact of 
the Detroit newspaper strike, investi- 
gating uhf in Indiana and Pennsylva- 
nia, touring the major markets in Texas 
(and making an "informal inspection 
in Las Vegas which yielded no story 
but proved that gambling doesn't 
pay ). 

Frank is one of 55 editors, writers, pro- 
duction experts and stringers who cover 
the world of radio and television for 



or Salesmen? 



B # T. It's a staff that puts out a book 
of 85,000 informative, informed and 
pertinent words a week. Raw material 
is 100,000 words a day that reach B*T 
Wash D C via AP, UP and B'T's own 
communications to bureaus in New 
York, Chicago and Hollywood, plus 
on-the-spot Congressional and FCC 
coverage. 

A recent survey* among 4,584 radio- 
television executives (42.2% replied) 
revealed that 90.4% read B # T regu- 
larly. Not only do they read it— if they 
could get only two of the seven publi- 
cations in the field, 82.1% would 
choose B*T as one of the two; 78.4% 
prefer B # T"s weekly frequency; 57.1% 
list B*T as the publication in which 
an advertisement would have the most 
impact on them (runner up scored 
18.7%). 

B'T's 77,440 readers every week find 
B # T indispensable. That's why B*T 
carried more pages of radio-tv advertis- 
ing (3,832) in 1955 than all other verti- 
cal publications in its field combined. 

*For a complete summary, write Executive 
and Publication Headquarters, Broadcast- 
ing^Telecasting, 173S DeSales St., N.W., 
Washington 6, D. C. 




WIBC- Leads in Indiana 




During each of the past five years, WIBC has 
received among other honors for community serv- 
ice, the National Safety Council's Public Interest 
Award for Exceptional Service in the Farm Safety 
Field. WIBC is the only Indianapolis radio sta- 
tion ever to receive this award. 

Obviously, even WIBC's community service pro- 
grams build big audiences because in the 31 
county Indianapolis trading area, WIBC pro- 
grams rank first during 447 out of 504 rated quar- 
ter hours each week.* 

*Pulse Area Study. Sept.— Oct.. 1955 

Chiefly responsible for WIBC's community serv- 
ice success and big audiences are WIBC's well- 
known personality salesmen . . . Easy Gwynn, 
Jack Morrow, Joan Evans, Gordon Graham and 
many others. These same "personalities" are 
available on a "first come, first served" basis to 
help you sell your product or service. 




FIRST IN 
COMMUNITY 
SERVICE 



FIRST IN 
AUDIENCE 





To Sell Indianapolis, and Indiana, 
the Best Buy... the Only Buy Is... WIBC! 



WIBC 



1070 KC 



. The Friendly 
Voice of Indiana 



2835 N. Illinois Street 
Indianapolis 8, Indiana 

Richard M. Fairbanks, 
President and General Manager 



JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 




THOMAS A. WRIGHT 



on all accounts 

AGENCY WORK has proved to be the "happy 
combination" of television and advertising at 
all media levels that Tom Wright first envi- 
sioned when he served as public relations rep- 
representative for NBC in tv's early days. 

Today, during the growth period of televi- 
sion, Mr. Wright describes his media group 
supervisor role at Leo Burnett Co., Chicago, 
as one of "synthesizing a media plan upon 
marketing strategy." In that capacity he is re- 
sponsible for media recommendations in a Bur- 
nett client group that includes the Kellogg Co., 
Maytag, Tea Council and Campbell Soup Co. 

A native of Plainfield, N- J- (born March 
18, 1919), Thomas A. Wright majored in jour- 
nalism at the U. of North Carolina and grad- 
uated with a B.A. degree in 1941. During the 
summers for two years (1939-40) he was a 
combination PR-guide representative for NBC 
at the New York World's Fair. 

After five years in the Marine Corps as ad- 
ministrative staff communications officer (he 
attained the rank of major), Mr. Wright set out 
to make advertising his career. 

Joining BBDO, Mr. Wright worked on every 
phase of agency tv operation from 1946 to 
1951, preparing and planning budget presenta- 
tions for Hit Parade, Betty Crocker and other 
programs; developing programs and talent-time 
sales recommendations, and supervising con- 
tract preparations and negotiations. He also 
organized and staffed the tv traffic section and 
worked closely with studio producers. (Among 
his other credits: planning and placement of 
the Chiquita banana minute movie campaign for 
United Fruit Co.) At BBDO he was variously 
head of tv account service, business manager of 
the tv department and head of motion picture 
and tv film department. 

Mr. Wright left BBDO to join Dundes & 
Frank as vice president and radio-tv director 
with general agency assignments in 1951 and 
the following year became associated with NBC 
as account executive in radio and tv sales. 

Mr. Wright came to Burnett in September 
1955 and now handles all media in his particu- 
lar account group. All four clients have been 
especially active in network and spot tv and 
one of them, the Tea Council, recently an- 
nounced a $248,000 spot television campaign 
in major cities. Burnett handles the Franco- 
American line, frozen soups, tomato juice and 
tomato catsup for Campbell. 

Mr. Wright married the former Christine 
Allen. They have three children — Laurinda, 
10, Thomas Jr., 6, and Cynthia, 4 — and live 
in suburban Woodstock. His hobby is golf. 



Page 24 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 





1 
IV 



5^ 



r 



WKMH 

TOPS 

ALL 

In Out -of -Home Audience! 




\ 



HERE'S PROOF! 



6 A.M. TO 12 NOON 

WKMH 16 

Network A 15 

Network B 14 

Network C 13 

Network D 12 

Station B 10 

Station C 

Station D 3 

Station E 1 

Misc. 




WKMH gets the biggest tune-in share of 
Detroit's tremendous automobile traffic . . . 
not just in the morning . . . not just in the 
afternoon . . . not just at night . . . not just 5 days a week . . . BUT, 
MORNING, NOON and NIGHT ... 7 DAYS A WEEK! 

These figures prove that WHENEVER YOU'RE ON WKMH, YOU'RE 
GETTING DETROIT'S BIGGEST SHARE OF AUDIENCE! 



12 NOON TO 6 P.M. 

WKMH 18 

Network A 14 

Network B 13 

Station B 13 

Station C 11 

Network C 10 

Network D 7 

Station D 3 

Station E 3 

Mist 9 



6 P.M. TO 12 MIDNIGHT 

WKMH 19 

Network A 15 

Network B 14 

Station B 14 

Network C 13 

Network D 12 

Station C 4 

Station 2 

Station E 1 

Misc. 





its 



J*;; 

4k 



• - -"»' "US 

9& 






Save up to 15% 

By Using 2 or More of 
these Powerful Stations 

WKMH- "ssr 

wkmf- aa 

WKHWI- 

wsam- s xr 

HERE'S HOW: 

Buy All 4 Stations SAVE 15% 
Buy Any 3 Stations SAVE 10% 
Buy Any 2 Stations SAVE 5% 

Represented by HEADLEY-REED 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



FMT1 



DEARBORN— DETROIT 

Fred A. Knorr, Pres. 
JOHN CARROLL, Mg. Director 



5000 WATTS 
NIGHT and DAY! 





I 



jiil i 1 1 1 1 1 min 
cmWlll IHEDfii 



ir^iEIiH.'i 

KNORR Broadcasting CORP 



July 2, 1956 • Page 25 




KTHS 



(LITTLE ROCK) 



WINS HONORS IN YALE, TOO! 



KTHS — Basic CBS Radio in Little Rock — is Arkansas' 
only 50,000-watt station. Its audience includes 
hundreds of thousands of people throughout 
the state. 

Take Yale (Ark.), for example. Population-wise, it can't 
compare with its Ivy-League counterpart. But 
combined with hundreds of other communi- 
ties, it helps account for KTHS's interference- 
free daytime coverage of more than 3,370,000 
people! 

Ask your Branham man for all the facts on KTHS — 
Arkansas' BIG radio value. 



KTHS 



50,000 Watts 
CBS Radio 



BROADCASTING FROM 

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 

Represented by The Branham Co. 

Under Same Management as KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 
B. G. Robertson, General Manager 




The Station KTHS Daytime primary (0.5MV M) area 
has a population of 1. 002.758 people ot *hnm ovf 
100.000 do not receive primary da time service irni 
any other radii, station . . Our interfertnctr-tVfie 
daytime roveraae area has a population of 3.372.433- 



Page 26 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



BROADCASTING 
TELECASTING 

July 2, 1956 Vol. 51, No. 1 



FCC SKETCHES AN OUTLINE 
OF WAY TELEVISION MAY GO 

• Long range plan leaves door open for major shift to uhf 

• For the present, it proposes deintermixture in 13 markets 

• Reactions are lukewarm, most far from optimistic 

• The educated guess: final decision at least three years away 



TELEVISION'S allocations future was sketched 
out by the FCC last week when the Commis- 
sion issued its long-awaited decision in the 
eight-month-old allocations proceeding. 

The FCC held out the possibility of moving 
all television — or those assignments in a major 
geographic area — to the uhf band in the un- 
specified future. 

It also proposed to deintermix 13 markets 
immediately and it raised the uhf maximum for 
power to 5 million watts and revised its mile- 
age separations standards from city-to-city to 
transmitter-to-transmitter. 

The prospective move of television to the 
uhf band was predicated on the hope that uhf 
propagation and equipment can be improved 
to more nearly equal that of vhf. * 

The deintermixture proposals — which do not 
become final until after the Commission has 
studied comments and counter-comments and 
probably heard oral argument — were issued 
with the idea of equalizing competitive facili- 
ties in the 13 markets. Some were authorized 
on slim four to three votes. 

Comments on the deintermixture proposals 
were requested by Sept. 10; on the long range 
plan by Oct. 1. 

Comr. John C. Doerfer issued a general dis- 
sent to the entire report, and most emphatically 
to the proposals to deintermix the 13 cities. 
Comr. Richard A. Mack urged that no moves 
be made now until the long-range project was 
completed. Other commissioners expressed 
varying views on separate items of the report. 

But, even as the industry was studying the 
document, the Commission went ahead and 
approved vhf grants in Peoria and Springfield. 
111. — two of the prospective deintermixture 
cities. The grants were made to WIRL Peoria 
(ch. 8) and WMAY Tv Inc., Springfield (ch. 2). 
but forbidding construction and conditioned on 
any changes which might take place in the 
channels assigned after the proposed rule- 
making is concluded. 

The FCC also finalized the grant of ch. 5 
to WRAL Raleigh, N. C. 

Reaction from broadcasters and manufac- 
turers was slow in coming. However, some 
comments were made late in the week by: 

Committee for Competitive Television: CCT 
said the Commission's proposals offer a "prom- 
ising blueprint" for establishing an all-channel 
television system. "It now remains to be seen 
whether the Commission will develop the sys- 
tem according to the plan." CCT called on the 
Commission to refrain from granting vhf chan- 
nels in the 13 areas proposed to be deinter- 



mixed. It added that "failure to do this would 
virtually nullify the deintermixture proposal." 
It also urged as "mandatory" that the Com- 
mission immediately institute proceedings to 
shift vhf to uhf channels in these markets "in 
order that the deintermixture proposal may 
become deintermixture in reality." 

Radio-Electronic-Television Mfrs. Assn. had 
no comment on the proposals, but one uniden- 
tified manufacturer was quoted as saying that 
"The FCC has just laid a great big egg. This 
will change nothing." 

Another set maker expressed doubt that 
anything substantial would be decided for an- 



other year. "Maybe we"ll get a final ruling by 
next June or July," he said. 

The Senate Commerce Committee, it was 
understood, instructed its counsel, Kenneth 
Cox, to study the Commission's action and 
make any required changes in its own proposed 
report on the subject. Individual Senators were 
reported to have expressed satisfaction that the 
FCC had finally acted. The committee held 
hearings on allocations earlier this year. 

Benedict V. Cottone, counsel to the Uhf 
Industry Coordinating Committee: Mr. Cottone 
declared that uhf operators must be gratified 
that the Commission has accepted the principle 
of deintermixture. However, he felt "keen dis- 
appointment" that the FCC refused to permit 
vhf squeeze-ins with lower power and antenna 
heights at reduced mileage separations. 

Other reactions were varied. Telecasters who 
stood to be hurt were naturally resentful; those 
who stood to benefit were happy. 

Most observers were certain that the long 
range plan was at least three years from any 
sort of start. It will be that long, engineers 
and attorneys felt, before any development pro- 
gram could attain worthwhile improvements 
bringing them to the level of vhf. 

As to the deintermixture proposals, it was 



HOW THEY VOTED IN DEINTERMIXTURE CASES 




McConnaughey Hyde Mack Lee Webster Bartley Doerfer 



Evansville 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Charleston 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Elmira 


No 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Springfield- 
St. Louis 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Miami 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Hartford- 
Providence 


No 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Duluth- 
Superior 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Mobile- 
New Orleans 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes* 


Yes* 


No 


Madison 


No 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Norfolk- 
Portsmouth- 
Newport News 


Yes 


No 


No 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Peoria- 
Rock Island 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


. Yes 


No 


Fresno- 
Santa Barbara 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Albany- 

Schenectady- 

Troy 


No 


Yes 


No 


Yes* 

ri+ : — 


Yes* 


Yes* 


No 



* Although concurring, also voted to delete existing vhf operation in these markets. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



JUfy 2, 1956 e Page 27 



the consensus of some broadcasters and Wash- 
ington attorneys that final decisions on these 13 
cases would not be reached before the end of 
this year, or early in 1957. They also felt that 
there probably would be only three or four 
cities actually deintermixed. And, it was point- 
ed out, there were bound to be appeals to the 
courts which would stretch out the completion 
of these cases at least another year. 

Some observers noted that Comr. Webster's 
place would be taken by T. A. M. Craven (who 
takes office today). A change in one vote, it 
was pointed out, would reverse five out of the 13 
proposed deintermixtures. 

The allocations proceeding was begun Nov. 
10, 1955, when the FCC denied 
a group of deintermixture peti- 
tions. The Commission said 
then that the question had be- 
come nationwide in scope and 
could not be resolved on an in- 
dividual basis. 

Prior to that time the FCC 
had been called on to deintermix some 30-40 
cities. It held an oral argument on five of these 
cases and then decided in its November ruling 
that a general, overall allocations proceeding 
was required. 

The allocations proceeding drew more than 
500 comments, plans, suggestions and counter 
comments. It was the subject of almost weekly 
Commission meetings since the end of April. 

At various times it had been reported that 
the Commission favored "selective deintermix- 
ture," large-scale deintermixture, division of 
the country into an eastern uhf area and a 
western combination uhf-vhf area, and no 
change in present principles of allocations 
assignments. 

It is known that at one time recently the 
Commission was ready to issue its long range 
proposal and invite individual comments on 
specific deintermixtures [B»T, June 11]. 



Television began commercial operations in 
1941 when the FCC allocated 18 channels in 
the 50-294 mc band. In 1945, the television 
spectrum was contracted to 13 channels in the 
band from 44 mc to 216 mc, and fm broad- 
casting moved up to its present 88-108 mc. The 
following year, ch. 1 (44-50 mc) was deleted 
from the television band and allocated for 
industrial, public safety and transportation 
services. 

It was in 1945 that the Commission said 
that the 13 (now 12) vhf channels were in- 
sufficient for a nationwide, competitive televi- 
sion service, and that tv must expand in uhf. 

In 1952, following the four-year freeze, the 



COMPLETE TEXT OF FCC REPORT AND ORDER 
IS IN THIS ISSUE, BEGINNING ON PAGE 91 



uhf band (470-890 mc) was opened to com- 
mercial tv operation. 

Within a year, it was apparent that uhf sta- 
tions, particularly where they faced competition 
from vhf outlets in the same communities, were 
in trouble. Heart of the problem was the. fact 
that in vhf areas, viewers refused to spend the 
$50-$75 necessary to convert their receivers. In 
addition to this, uhfs technical disadvantages 
led advertisers and networks to prefer vhf affilia- 
tion. 

Since July 1952, when television application 
processing was resumed by the FCC, more than 
300 commercial uhf grants have been made. As 
of today there are 94 uhf stations operating. 
More than 130 uhf grantees have returned their 
permits, while the others have retained their 
construction permits awaiting the Commission's 
decision on uhfs future. 

In issuing last week's ruling, the Commission 



denied various proposals that would have per- 
mitted vhf squeeze-ins at reduced mileage 
separations, to drop the table of allocations and 
decide applications on a case-by-case basis, to 
permit antennas in Zone 1 to be 1,250 ft. above 
average terrain. 

In discussing the possibility of moving tele- 
vision to the uhf band, the Commisison declared 
that this would have many advantages: there 
would be equality of competition among all sta- 
tions; there would be no problems of receiver 
incompatability, and more stations would be 
built and successfully operated. 

Also, said the FCC, the vacating of the vhf 
band would open up space for the growing needs 
of other, non-broadcast services. 

The Commission asked that 
comments be supplied on what 
use might be made of the vhf 
band if it is decided to move 
television to chs. 14-83. In this 
connection, the FCC wondered 
whether 30-60 mc should not 
be set aside for ionsospheric scatter communica- 
tions and whether the lower vhf band might not 
be utilized by the mobile services. 

This is considered one of the most dangerous 
elements in the FCC's document. 

Key to any changeover, the Commission em- 
phasized, was uhfs capability to serve as well 
as vhf does. This means, the FCC said, that 
uhf transmitters, receivers and antennas must be 
upgraded. 

At present, uhf stations suffer in comparison 
with vhf outlets in lesser coverage, with prob- 
lems of shadow areas, and in the requirement 
for higher powers to adequately serve their 
markets. Uhf receivers also are more expensive 
and less sensitive and selective than vhf sets. 
Receivers are more noisy than comparable vhf 
receivers, while positioning of antennas also is 
considered more critical than for vhf. 

The Commission urged that a program of 



THE PROPOSED-TO-BE-DEINTERMIXED THIRTEEN 



THERE are 13 cities which have been 
tapped by the FCC for deintermixture — 
more or less. It is these cities — some of 
which were proposed to be made all uhf, 
some all or heavily vhf, and some with a 
single vhf operating station remaining in a 
sea of uhf assignments — about which pro- 
posed notices of rule making were issued 
last week. Comments requested by Sept. 10. 

The cities, and the proposals: 

Elmira, N. Y. — All uhf by deleting ch. 9 
and adding ch. 30. This would give Elmira 
chs. 18, 24 and 30. Comrs. McConnaughey, 
Doerfer and Mack dissented. Ch. 9 had been 
allocated to Elmira Nov. 30, 1955. 

Evansville, Ind. — All commercial uhf by 
switching the educational reservation from 
ch. 56 to ch. 7. This would give Evansville 
chs. *7, 50, 56, 62. Comrs. Doerfer and 
Mack dissented. WTVW (TV) holds a grant 
for ch. 7. 

Fresno-Santa Barbara, Calif. — Make Fres- 
no all uhf by moving ch. 12 to Santa Bar- 
bara, adding ch. 30 from Madera, Calif., and 
moving ch. 59 into Madera. This would 
give Fresno chs. *18, 24, 30, 47 and 53, and 
Santa Barbara chs. 3, 12, 20 and 26. Comrs. 
Doerfer and Mack dissented. KFRE-TV 
operates on ch. 12. 

Hartford, Conn. — Providence, R. I. — 
Make Hartford all uhf by deleting ch. 3 and 
moving it to Providence, transferring ch. 61 
from Easthampton, Mass., to Hartford, and 
deleting ch. 65 at Meriden, Conn. This 
would give Hartford chs. 18, *24 and 61; 



Providence chs. 3, 10, 12, 16 and *36. 
Comrs. McConnaughey, Doerfer and Mack 
dissented. Comr. Doerfer suggested that if 
ch. 3 is taken away from Hartford, ch. 13 
from New York should be substituted. 

Madison, Wis. — All commercial uhf by 
switching the educational reservation from 
ch. 21 to ch. 3. This would give Madison 
chs. *3, 21, 27 and 33. Comrs. McCon- 
naughey, Doerfer and Mack dissented. 
WISC-TV is on program tests on ch. 3. 

Mobile, Ala. -New Orleans, La. — Make 
Mobile all commercial vhf by moving ch. 4 
from New Orleans, moving ch. 42 (now edu- 
cational in Mobile) to New Orleans (where 
it would be commercial). This would give 
Mobile chs. 4, 5, 10 and *48. New Orleans 
would have 6 (WDSU-TV), *8, 20, 26, 32, 
42 and 61. Comrs. Doerfer and Mack dis- 
sented. Comrs. Webster and Bartley con- 
curred, but would also propose the deletion 
of ch. 6 from New Orleans. 

Peoria-Rock Island, 111. — Make Peoria all 
uhf by deleting ch. 8 and adding ch. 25. 
Ch. 8 would be assigned to Rock Island. 
This would necessitate assigning ch. 77 in 
lieu of ch. 40 at Galesburg, 111. This would 
give Peoria chs. 19, 25, *37 and 43, and 
Rock Island chs. 4, 6,. 8, *30, 36 and 42. 
Comrs. Doerfer and Mack dissented. Ch. 
8 was granted to WIRL Peoria, Friday. 

Springfield, IU.-St. Louis, Mo. — Make 
Springfield all uhf by deleting ch. 2 and mov- 
ing it to St. Louis, and adding ch. 39 to 



Springfield. This would necessitate substi- 
tuting ch. 49 for ch. 53 at Lincoln, 111. This 
would give Springfield chs. 20, 39 and *66, 
and St. Louis chs. 2, 4, 5, *9, 11, 30, 36, 
and 42. Comrs. Doerfer and Mack dis- 
sented. Ch. 2 was granted to WMAY-TV 
Inc., that city, Friday. 

Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. Y. — Make 
area predominantly uhf by deleting ch. 10 
from Vail Mills, N. Y. (Albany area) and 
adding ch. 47. This would give Albany- 
Schenectady-Troy chs. 6 (WRGB [TV] 
Schenectady), *17, 23, 35, 41 and 47. Comrs. 
McConnaughey, Doerfer and Mack dis- 
sented. Comrs. Webster, Bartley and Lee 
concurred but would also propose the de- 
letion of ch. 6 from this area. Ch. 10 had 
been assigned to Vail Mills Nov 10, 1955. 

Charleston, S. C. — Make Charleston pre- 
dominantly vhf by adding ch. 4. This would 
give Charleston chs. 2, 4, 5, *13 and 17. 

Duluth, Minn.-Superior, Wis. — Make area 
predominantly vhf by switching education- 
al reservation from ch. 8 to ch. 32. This 
would give Duluth-Superior chs. 3, 6, 8, 
*32 and 38. 

Miami, Fla. — Make area predominantly 
vhf by adding ch. 6. This would give Miami 
chs. *2, 4, 6, 7, 10, 23 and 33. Comrs. 
Webster and Mack dissented. 

Norfolk-Portsmouth-Newport News, Va. 
— Make area predominantly vhf by adding 
ch. 13 to Norfolk from New Bern, N. C. 
Add ch. 12 to New Bern. This would give 
Norfolk area chs. 3, 10, 13, 15, *21 and 33. 
Comrs. Hyde, Webster and Mack dissented. 



Page 28 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



research and development — along the lines of 
the crash program recommended by Chairman 
McConnaughey to the NARTB convention last 
April — be instituted for uhf. Among its goals, 
the FCC stated, must be the increasing of uhf 
transmitter power, the use of boosters and 
satellites to fill in shadow areas, and the im- 
provement of uhf receivers and antennas. 

A transition period — 10 years has been sug- 
gested — was referred to by the Commission as 
one means of accomplishing the changeover. 
The FCC stated that there might be a period of 
time when vhf stations would ODerate simul- 
taneously on uhf. It also declared that there 
might be a cutoff date for vhf broadcasting. 

This transition period must be long enough, 
the FCC stated, to cover the useful life of vhf- 
only receivers in the hands of the public, and 
to permit vhf stations to amortize existing trans- 
mitting equipment. 

Congress might legislate tax relief and it 
also might ban interstate shipment of tv re- 
ceivers without uhf bands, the Commission sug- 
gested. This would be for the purpose of in- 
ducing the manufacture of uhf receivers. 

There have been suggestions that the price 
differential between vhf-only receivers and those 
with uhf be ameliorated by deleting the 10% 
excise tax on uhf-equipped television sets. Con- 
gressional tax committees have never accepted 
this proposal. 

As part of its discussion of interim measures 
(deintermixture in the 13 cities), the Commis- 
sion spelled out the considerations it would 
apply for favorable action. 

Standards for Change 

Standards for deleting a vhf allocation from a 
city should include such items as ( 1 ) the num- 
ber of people losing service, (2) how many uhf 
stations operate in the area, (3) the degree of 
uhf set conversion, and (4) terrain factors. 

Where an additional vhf channel is sought to 
be moved into an area, the Commission said 
these criteria would apply: (1) meeting trans- 
mitter-to-transmitter mileage separations, and 
(2) why the prospective community needed the 
assignment more than the community from 
which the vhf wavelength was to be taken. 

In both instances, the Commission said, the 
overall effects of these moves would be con- 
sidered as they relate to the goal of more effec- 
tive competition among stations. 

Buried in the FCC document was an allusion 
to the fact that the 13 cities proposed to be de- 
intermixed were not all which the Commission 
was considering. There are, it was learned, 
about 30 deintermixture petitions pending FCC 
action. It was possible, it was understood, that 
the Commission might report out a few more 
notices in the next few weeks. 

Also, in its order, the FCC virtually invited 
other such petitions. 

Methods of computing coverage of vhf and 
uhf stations were spelled out in the Commis- 
sion's document. This was for those seeking 
deintermixture changes in order to meet the 
standards set out. These computations must 
be based, the FCC said, on 1,000-ft. antenna 
height, maximum power and transmitter loca- 
tion near the center of the city to be served. 

According to some engineering sources, the 
FCC has revised its mileage tables, bringing 
uhf nearer the equivalent of vhf in theoretical 
coverage. These same sources pointed out that 
the Commission was still working on averages, 
rather than permitting showing to be made on 
actual measurements in individual cases. 

The Commission, however, declared that 
other data, based on other assumptions, would 
be accepted if submitted. This would be in 
addition to the information required under its 
criteria. 



RADIO, TV, OTHER ADVERTISING MEDIA 
REPORTED FACING GREATEST CHALLENGE 

Delegates to 53d annual convention of Advertising Assn. of the West 
in Los Angeles are told by principal speakers of new demands in an 
expanding economy, where automation has been so successful in 
destroying manufacturing bottlenecks. 



TELEVISION, radio and the other major ad- 
vertising media are facing the greatest sales 
challenge of their history in the basic revolution 
taking place in retail marketing today, some 
1,000 delegates to the 53d annual convention of 
the Advertising Assn. of the West were told in 
Los Angeles last week. 

The demands on media of a rapidly expand- 
ing economy, where automation has broken the 
traditional manufacturing bottleneck and shifted 
the burden of continued business growth in- 
stead to mass distribution and consumption, 
were highlighted by several keynote speakers. 

Others pointed out that media are being given 



be afforded new opportunities to prove them- 
selves as advertisers traditionally linked with 
older channels of consumer communication 
adapt themselves to the new marketing situation. 

Speakers were divided, however, on the ex- 
tent of aggressiveness or superlative appropriate 
in ad copy although agreeing that the sales prob- 
lem, medium and prospects should govern. 

John Karol, vice president in charge of net- 
work sales for CBS Radio, the only broadcaster 
on the agenda, told a Tuesday luncheon meeting 
that all major media are good media when used 
correctly but that radio, for instance, has the 
extra attribute of personal persuasion as well 




NEW OFFICERS of the Advertising Assn. of the West, elected at last week's convention 
in Los Angeles, are (I to r) Burt Oliver, vice president of Foote, Cone & Belding, Los 
Angeles, treasurer; Earl J. Glade Sr., public relations executive and former mayor of 
Salt Lake City, president; John Hoefer, co-founder of Hoefer, Dieterich & Brown, San 
Francisco, senior vice president; Mrs. Ella Breazeale, assistant cashier of the Valley 
National Bank, Tucson, Ariz., vice president at large, and Eugene M. McKim, director 
of advertising for Western Farm Life, Denver, Colo., secretary. 



more and more total sales responsibility — not 
just a role of pre-sales conditioning — as the 
concept of self-service retailing spreads and does 
away with the human link with the consumer, 
the clerk or salesman at the place of purchase. 

The expectation that color tv will capture 
new local retail dollars, traditionally poured 
heavily into newspaper advertising, also was 
voiced. 

Held Sunday, June 24, through last Wednes- 
day at the Hotel Statler. the convention of 
representatives from major agencies, media and 
advertisers in the 1 1 western states was marked 
for its general lack of specific "pitches" for any 
one advertising medium. Rather, speakers 
brought attention to the growing awareness that 
the bigger sales demands being placed on ad- 
vertising call for integrated and more effective 
use of all media, indicating that radio-tv will 



as other unique qualities. 

Addressing himself to the women delegates 
and the wives of the men also present, Mr. 
Karol noted that the purchasing power of the 
American woman today is such that any time 
an advertiser forgets or ignores her importance 
he will soon find out that the "hand that rocks 
the cradle can just as easily rock the boat." 

"In virtually every product category, you are 
the goal," Mr. Karol told his feminine listeners. 
"You are the reason for almost every product 
innovation and every ad in print and on the air. 
You are the subject of endless research. Your 
marrying age, your employment status, your 
shopping days, your color preferences, your con- 
victions about calories, cigars, hard water, foam 
rubber and form fit — all these things are of un- 
believably great importance to American busi- 
ness. 

"It is the same story in selecting advertising 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



July 2. 1956 



Page 29 




DISCUSSING color tv exhibition presented at CBS Television City, Hollywood, for the 
AAW convention are (I to r), Nelson Carter, vice president of Foote, Cone & Belding 
and retiring president of Los Angeles Advertising Club, convention host; Howard 
Meighan, CBS-TV vice president in charge of western division; William Lodge, CBS-TV 
vice president in charge of general engineering, who also demonstrated Ampex tv 
tape recorder to delegates; Frank Samuels, CBS-TV Pacific sales manager, and Russel 
Eller, advertising manager of Sunkist growers and convention program chairman. 



media. Will the life span of a four-color ad in 
a woman's magazine carry more, or less, im- 
pact that the greater frequency of radio com- 
mercials in the framework of believability of a 
daytime serial? Will the costly glamour of big- 
audience nighttime television produce more, or 
fewer, sales than a double truck in a general 
magazine? Even as prejudiced as you might 
believe me to be, I admit freely that no one 
medium for any given product is likely to be 
the perfect answer in reaching you and con- 
vincing you." 

Mr. Karol emphasized, "I must go on the 
record, however, as saying that the low-cost 
combination of reach and frequency that good 
radio provides, both locally and on a network 
basis, gives it a unique status among media. 
It cannot, of course, claim the exclusive 
privilege of moving women to buy Brand A 
over Brand B. 

"Actually, the choice of a media depends to 
a large degree on the psychology behind the 
copy approach. Which, for example, would 
impress you most? A picture of a new shade of 
lipstick, or a voice telling you what this new 
shade of lipstick will do for you. Without 
minimizing the value of pictures and copy to 
be read, I believe that for many products, it's 
what they will do for people that is most im- 
portant. And I think advertisers tend to over- 
look this. There is no fact of selling so im- 
portant as one person talking to another — tell- 
ing the prospect what a product or service will 
do for the potential buyer." 

The CBS Radio executive felt manufacturers 
and agencies sometimes fail to match the 
product to the needs of the consumer and 
"sheep-like" copy other advertising. "The eye- 
patch for shirts, the animal for liquor, the man's 
man for cigarettes," he cited, commenting that 
"imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery 
but we're not in the business of flattering each 
other; we're in the business of selling goods and 
services. 

"There is too often apt to be a similar pattern 
in media selection. Some of you remember 
when radio burst on the advertising scene and 
became the great glamour medium. The fact 
that radio was a fine new selling tool should not 
have detracted from the fact that newspapers 
and magazines and comics and the rest were 
also still good. 

"In our growing economy we can use more 
ways of communicating with the consumer. 



We must keep our perspective. We're going 
through — actually, we're most of the way 
through — a similar situation with television. 
It has taken time to absorb this new glamour 
medium. Now, more and more advertisers have 
reached conclusions as to what tv can do and 
cannot do and we are finding that, again, all 
media are settling into their proper places to be 
used singularly and in combination to produce 
the best results for the particular product." 

Problems of selling to women and a defense 
of the excited adjective in radio-tv and other 
copy were set forth in a talk before another 
session of the convention by William G. Werner, 
director of public and legal services, Procter & 
Gamble Co. 

His theme was "Four Guideposts in Adver- 
tising": good, pre-tested products, fully support- 
able claims, scrupulous regard for the law and 
a constant concern for public opinion. 

Reviewing in detail the research and labora- 
tory testing of products before they are pre- 
sented to the public, Mr. Werner said that 
"when it comes to translating provable product 
facts into pleasing, persuasive advertising, how- 
ever, we need more than a tabulation of points 
of superiority." 

Two problems in advertising creation appear 
here, the P&G executive said, both tied up with 



the word "supportability." One is that a firm 
like P&G must sell to women and the second 
concerns "the strength and steam of our com- 
petition." 

Comparing the "quiet" approach of ethical 
medical advertising to that of selling to women, 
Mr. Werner said "if advertising is to be per- 
suasive to the fullest possible measure with our 
lady-folk, it cannot talk to them in a strictly 
logical and technical tone of voice. It must 
contain superlatives. It should sound excited 
and convinced — carry on in a way that a serious 
male critic of advertising might not like." 

Quoting what he considered typical woman- 
to-woman conversation, Mr. Werner continued, 
"No advertising on earth could begin to match 
the hyperbole that the average woman hears 
and bubbles forth in an hour over the bridge 
table. What then is wrong with talking to 
women in advertising in the sort of language 
they know best?" 

Observing that it is mostly "professional 
critics" who take exception "to the strength of 
such enthusiastic claims and the use of quite a 
few superlatives" in P&G advertising, Mr. 
Werner said "we have done a great deal of re- 
search among housewives and we know that the 
public-at-large is not confused by our claims or 
disturbed by our vigor. 

"Please keep in mind, though, that here I am 
not advocating the use of any claims which 
cannot be technologically supported. I am re- 
ferring here only to such things as legitimate 
puffery: reasonable 'excitedness'; the warmth 
and vigor of copy that springs from sincere en- 
thusiasm for a good, honest product, that fully 
deserves and earns that kind of enthusiasm from 
its loyal users." 

Concerning the aspect of intense competition 
in his range of products, Mr. Werner said that 
in some fields "competition is expressed most 
vigorously over the counter, by personal selling, 
by house-to-house work or in other ways. In 
our business, the vigor of competition in ad- 
vertising is a characteristic of the industry that 
we just cannot ever forget for a minute. 

"There is nothing about clean and decent, 
hard-driving competition that should be con- 
sidered anything but helpful to the strength of 
our nation." 

Noting the rapid technological advances in 
recent years in soaps, detergents, cooking prod- 
ucts and dentifrices resulting from the competi- 
tive drive, Mr. Werner said that "when you 
couple this keen competition in the laboratory 
with low-cost quickly replaced household prod- 
ucts, you are bound to have a need for vigor- 
ously competitive advertising as the quickest, 




HEAD TABLE guests at Tuesday luncheon addressed by John Karol, vice president in 
charge of network sales, CBS Radio, were (I to r). Earl Glade, newly elected president of 
AAW and member of board of KSL Salt Lake City, which he founded; Mr. Karol; Henry 
Mayers, Mayers Co., Los Angeles, and Hal Stebbins, Hal Stebbins Inc., Los Angeles. 



Page 30 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



cheapest way to tell the good news to the public. 
In this sort of rivalry for attention, we have 
learned that we just have to state our claims 
forcefully and with confidence and enthusiasm, 
if we want to register them effectively against 
the other fellow." 

Similarly, because women have varied pref- 
erences in the form of product they want, P&G 
developed its own competitive brands to meet 
these needs and promotes each equally inten- 
sively through radio, tv and other media, he 
indicated. 

Referring to the close "constructive" co- 
operation of the legal services staff with the 
P&G advertising department, Mr. Werner ex- 
plained how such legal aid contributes to the 
continuing creation of effective advertising. 
Legal review makes certain that the advertising 
complies with national, state and local laws, he 
said and also involves packaging and promotion 
(contests, premiums, "free" offers). Equally im- 
portant, he said, is "the law of the man on 
the street corner," which calls for the careful 
review of all advertising, promotion and pack- 
aging by the public relations staff. 

Too much blatant advertising in all media, 
including radio and tv, however, was held re- 
sponsible by Don Belding, chairman of the 
executive committee, Foote, Cone & Belding, 
Los Angeles, for lowering the sales effectiveness 
of both the ad and the medium. Addressing 
the convention on the subject, "Don't Shout So 
Loud — I Can't Hear You," he analyzed com- 
mon faults which build up reader, listener or 
viewer resistance. 

Function Is to Sell 

"We must never forget that the function of 
advertising is to sell," Mr. Belding said, "and 
when it fails in that responsibility or performs 
it poorly, our industry suffers, business suffers 
and we have not performed our duty." 

Mr. Belding noted that "some of the televi- 
sion and radio commercia's for local distribu- 
tors are good examples of shouting in the hog- 
calling manner. It's hard to tell one from 
another. They are all hurry, hurry, hurry, 
breathless, faintly dishonest — by implying that 
you can trade your three-year-old car in for 
a new one and it doesn't cost anything, when 
what they mean is that it doesn't cost you any- 
thing right then. They also say you can drive 
a high priced car for just 16 cents a day, but 
it turns out to be 16 cents a day more than a 
medium priced car, not 16 cents a day. 

"The most objectionable part, however, is 
that they beat you to death and scream so loud, 
so fast. If a lawyer shouts to a jury he is looked 
upon as a hollow buffoon. The man who talks 
calmly and straight from the shoulder, using 
simple common sense, is the one that wins 
juries and customers." 

"Several competitors shouting the same thing 
get a little monotonous, too." 

"A recent study indicated that most tv set 
manufacturers seemed glued to the illustrative 
idea of a family around a tv set. Most mechan- 
ical refrigerator manufacturers show an open 
refrigerator with a woman standing there, usu- 
ally pointing her grubby little fingers at the 
food. Whiskey distillers all like a big bottle and 
a glass. Car manufacturers show the car with 
a lot of people around. But buyers are not im- 
pressed by the obvious." 

The FC&B executive observed, "we drive to 
work by a similar route each day. The land- 
scape becomes commonplace. As long as it 
stays that way our attention is seldom diverted 
toward it with any enthusiasm or interest. But 
burn down one of the buildings on our route 
tonight and tomorrow we will immediately 



notice the change." Creativity in advertising is 
something like that, from an attention stand- 
point. It sets the ad or commercial out from 
the ordinary. 

"A good illustration might be the current 
Pepsodent campaign. 'You'll wonder where the 
yellow went when you brush your teeth with 
Pepsodent' is a salesmanship in print idea. But 
left in minor space it will not reach its potential, 
just like a tree or vegetable will not grow to 
maturity without ample water." 

"So this idea was moved into saturation radio 
and is accomplishing a great sales result. And 
when you hear it you'll note it doesn't shout. 
It sells you." 

Mr. Belding said it is fine to stick with a 
good idea, but all ideas wear out sooner or 
later. 

"LSMFT is a good example of this," he said. 
"When George Washington Hill first introduced 
this with the telegraphic sounder on radio and 
the tobacco auctioneer testimonials in print, 



sales increases were phenomenal and he had no 
trouble maintaining first position among all 
the cigarette manufacturers. But now the line 
is part of the scenery. 

"And by this, I don't mean that we are not 
advertising to a parade, since new millions 
reach the buying age each year. But don't 
forget, we see a lot of the parade at once these 
days as our vision is expanded through radio, 
television and print. And if progress has done 
anything to human nature in America, it has 
made people a little deaf to continuous shout- 
ing, a little blind to dazzling claims, and a little 
numb to the continuous repetition of the com- 
monplace. A good creative idea in such an 
expanse of shouting, dazzling claims and medi- 
ocrity is like a pretty sailboat sailing along in 
the ocean. You can't help but see and admire 
it." 

Norman Strouse, president of J. Walter 
Thompson Co., New York, pointed to adver- 
tising's new status with management in his 
keynote address to the convention. "Now ad- 
vertising is looked upon as the generator of 



sales rather than sales the generator of adver- 
tising," he said. 

In an economy of scarcity, advertising's 
function is to inform and thus guide products 
through the channels of distribution, Mr. 
Strouse related, but in an economy of abund- 
ance, "advertising must sell, it must create 
wants dynamically in order to close the gap 
between an ever-ascending line of productivity 
and the desire to consume." 

Mr. Strouse said "advertising multiplied the 
force of selling far beyond what could have 
been possible through human selling contact" 
and made mass production effective. But today 
with automation "instead of the sales depart- 
ment belaboring the manufacturing department 
for more and more production, all of a sudden 
the sales executive almost finds himself in the 
role of the sorcerer's apprentice with machines 
spewing out the finished product in embarrass- 
ing quantities." 

With the high cost of automation equipment, 



Mr. Strouse noted, "advertising now must not 
only generate a current mass market to move 
current mass production but it also must build 
a brand franchise in future markets to make 
certain that forward investments in plant and 
facilities can be amortized and in the shortest 
possible time." 

The advertiser now thinks of not how little 
time or space he can get along with, Mr. 
Strouse indicated, but "how much advertising 
can we profitably invest" to generate high cur- 
rent sales and build a future market. 

This is made even more vital, he said, in 
view of the permanent curtailing effect World 
War II had on personal selling, especially in 
the retail field. Citing how advertising blocked 
depression trends in postwar years, he said 
"advertising has proved to be the miracle fibre 
of selling just as automation has proved to be 
the genie of production." 

In view of the great expansion of the U. S. 
economy seen for the next decade and the cor- 
responding boost expected in total advertising 
volume, Mr. Strouse called for a major person- 



WHERE DO THEY BUY THEIR SPOT TV? 

Pacific (14.0%) W. North Central (5.9%) New England (5.3%) 

$28,534,000 $11,951,000 $10,805,000 




$14,829,000 

BETWEEN October 1955 and March 1956, spot television advertisers in the U. S. 
invested $204,081,000 in that medium. B«T asked TvB, which supplied the total 
tabulation, to break down that expenditure by regions. The map above shows the 
results for nine sections of the country during the six-month period. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 31 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



nel training effort in the agency and advertising 
fields. 

George P. Hitchings, manager of economic 
analysis department of the Ford Motor Co., 
told the convention the American economy 
would grow 40% in the next decade and out- 
lined how the auto industry has proven that 
there are benefits to be derived from an ag- 
gressive search for expanded markets through 
advertising. 

Hal Stebbins, head of his own Los Angeles 
agency, cautioned delegates that the purpose 
of advertising is to "communicate ideas and 
images, not words." An outspoken advocate 
of "polite persuasion" and truth rather than 
the sledgehammer approach, he admonished, 
"If you don't believe it, don't say it." Detailing 
major marketing changes, Mr. Stebbins noted 
that advertising is becoming virtually the "total 
sales force" for more and more products now 
sold through self-service stores. 

Henry Mayers, also head of his own Los 
Angeles agency, in discussing "The National 
Retail Chain and National Advertisers" indi- 
cated retailers will continue to rely primarily 
on newspaper advertising but have become 
more active in radio and tv, noting color tv 
will appeal particularly to department stores. 

Mrs. Ivy Baker Priest, U. S. Treasurer, told 
the luncheon meeting Monday that while 1952 
saw the first principal effective use of television 
in a political campaign, the use of all other 
media increased too. She noted the big trend 
to use of advertising in politics has come since 
the first impact of radio in 1920. 

Remarking about the ability of government 
to instantly communicate with every segment 
of the people, Mrs. Priest said "there is no 
excuse for ignorance today" and expressed her 
respect for the intelligence of the public when 
informed about a political issue. She com- 
mended advertising for helping create Amer- 
ica's high standard of living and thanked all 
media for extensive support of the Treasury 
Dept.'s savings bonds program. 

Of political advertising per se, Mrs. Priest 
said, "We need a better business bureau for 
politics. Now we stop at the point of libel as 
defined by an attorney. Business has grown 
stronger on the theme of 'truth in advertising." 
We need that slogan in politics. The people of 
today are not gullible." 

In a panel before the junior program June 
24, Kenneth Harwood, chairman of the depart- 
ment of telecommunications at U. of Southern 
California, said the day of the single medium 
expert is about over and the need for the "pro- 
fessional communicator" familiar with the 
strength and weakness of all media has arrived. 
Citing automation's impact in radio's expansion 
and predicting even a pocket set in tv, Mr. 
Harwood felt an even closer marriage of the 
press and broadcast media will take place 
through the years with facsimile. 

NBC-TV talent presented an advertising pag- 
eant for the opening convention session Mon- 
day morning with Today in the West, the net- 
work's west coast weekday program, featuring 
a 10 minute segment saluting western adver- 
tisers. It was seen at the convention by a 
large screen projector. ABC-TV presented 
Lawrence Welk and his orchestra for Monday 
night entertainment at the Beverly Hilton and 
NBC-TV also supplied talent for the AAW 
president's banquet Wednesday night. 

Winner of the N. W. Ayers three-minute 
speaking contest Wednesday noon was John 
Kimball, student at the U. of Utah and part- 
time employe at D. W. Evans & Assoc., Salt 
Lake City. The award was presented by Dore 
Schary, MGM Studio head, luncheon guest 
speaker. The convention voted to hold its 
annual meeting next year in Honolulu. 



IN CHICAGO TV 



WHOSE COMMERCIALS GET MOST EXPOSURE? 

Hooper Index of Broadcast Advertisers (Based on Broadcast Advertisers Reports' monitoring) 
NATIONAL (NETWORK) INDEX 

Hooper Index 

Network Total "Commercial of Broadcast 



Rank 


Product & Agency Sh 


ows 


Networks 


Units" 


Adverti 


1. 


Bufferin (Young & Rubicam) 


5 


T 


TO 


163 


2. 


Anacin (Ted Bates) 


13 


3 


15i/ 2 


144 


3. 


Alka-Seltzer (Geoffrey Wade) 


5 


3 


91/ 2 


78 


4. 


Bromo-Seltzer (Lennen & 












Newell) 


1 


1 


3 


27 


5. 


Rolaids Antacid (Ted Bates) 


(P) 


1 


1 


19 


6. 


Pepto-Bismol (Benton & Bowles) 


1 


1 


1 


18 


7. 


Eno Antacid (Atherton & Currier 


)(P) 


1 


3 


14 


8. 


Bisodol (Sullivan, Stauffer, 












Colwell & Bayles) 


2 


1 


1% 


12 


9. 


Bayer Aspirin (Dancer- 










Fitzgerald-Sample) 


1 


T 


3 


10 


10. 


Phillips Tablets (Dancer- 












Fitzgerald-Sample) 


1 


1 


1 


8 


11. 


Phillips Milk of Magnesia 












(Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample) 


(P) 


1 


2 


2 



CHICAGO INDEX (NETWORK PLUS SPOT) 

Hooper Index 

Network Total "Commercial of Broadcast 



Rank 


Product & Agency Sh 


ows 


Networks 


Units" 


Adverti 


T. 


Alka-Seltzer (GoefFrey Wade) 


5 


4 


52i/ 2 


248 


2. 


Bufferin (Young & Rubicam) 


5 


2 


14 


174 


3. 


Bayer Aspirin (Dancer- 












Fitzgerald-Sample) 


1 


4 


172/3 


196 


4. 


Bromo-Seltzer (Lennen & 












Newell) 


1 


2 


6 


86 


5. 


Anacin (Ted Bates) 


13 


3 


15i/ 2 


60 


6. 


Rolaids Antacid (Ted Bates) 


(P) 


2 


2 


24 


7. 


Pepto-Bismol (Benton & Bowles) 


1 


1 


1 


20 


8. 


St. Joseph Aspirin (Lake-Spiro- 












Shurman) 




1 


Vi 


1 1 


9. 


Phillips Milk of Magnesia 










(Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample) 


(P) 


2 


4 


7 


10. 


Phillips Tablets (Dancer- 












Fitzgerald-Sample) 


1 


1 


1 


7 


11. 


Bisodol (Sullivan, Stauffer, 












Colwell & Bayles) 


2 


1 


1% 


5 



(P) Participations, as distinguished from sponsorship. 



In the above summary, monitoring occurred the week ending May 19, 1956. 

The Hooper Index of Broadcast Advertisers is a measure of the extent to which a 
sponsor's commercials are seen or heard. Each commercial is assigned a number of 
"commercial units," according to its length.* This number is then multiplied by the audi- 
ence rating attributed to that commercial.** When each commercial has thus been evalu- 
ated, the results for all commercials of each sponsor are added to form the HIBA. For 
further details of preparation, see the basic reports published by C. E. Hooper, Inc., 
Broadcast Advertisers Reports Inc. and American Research Bureau Inc. Above summary 
is prepared for use solely by Broadcasting • Telecasting. No reproduction permitted. 

* "Commercial Units": Commercials are taken from the monitored reports published by 
Broadcast Advertisers Reports Inc. A "commercial unit" is defined as a commercial exposure 
of more than 10 seconds but usually not more than one minute in duration. Four "commercial 
units" are attributed to a 30-minute program, and in the same proportion for programs of other 
lengths. A "station identification" equals one-half "commercial unit." 

** Audience ratings for television, both national and local, are those published by American 
Research Bureau Inc. Those for radio are the ratings of C. E. Hooper Inc. In the case of 
station breaks the average of the ratings for the preceding and following time periods is used 
wherever feasible: otherwise, the rating is that of either the preceding or following time 
period, normally the preceding. 



Kneip Meats Buying Spot 

E. W. KNEIP Inc., Chicago independent meat 
packer, on behalf of its corned beef products, 
has purchased a series of five weekly spots on 
WNBQ (TV) Chicago. The firm will extend its 



television activity to Davenport, Des Moines, 
Cedar Rapids, Omaha and other markets in 
future months, with participations in cooking 
shows, according to its agency, C. L. Miller 
Co., Chicago. Present tv expenditures will run 
at the rate of $1,000 a month, it was reported. 



Page 32 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



WORKING PARTNERS 



R 


ft , 






J 


v— 









FRANK HEADLEY, President 
DWIGHT REED, Vice President 
FRANK PELLEGRIN, Vice President 
PAUL WEEKS, Vice President 



RADIO 




TELEVISION INC. 



m m 

mm ~* ■ ' 




TELEVISION 



REPRESENTATHfESJNC. 



Yessir Podner! This H-R "Spread" is a workin' outfit. And 
that doesn't mean only the hired hands. There's a rule 
around here that even the bosses gotta work. And they do! 
The working partners that head up H-R are out on the 
"range" everyday, aroundin' up orders. No wonder this 
is the "brand" of representin' so many fine stations like. 
They know they'll get it at H-R because we "always send 
a man to do a man's job." 



380 Madison Ave. 
New York 17, N. Y. 
Oxford 7-3120 



35 E. Wacker Drive 
Chicago 1 , Illinois 
RAndolph 6-643! 



6253 Hollywood Boulevard 
Hollywood 28, Calif. 
Hollywood 2-6453 



155 Montgomery Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 
YUkon 2-5837 



4 1 5 Rio Grande Bldg. 
Dallas, Texas 
Randolph 51 49 



101 Marietta Street Building 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Cypress 7797 



520 lovett Boulevard 
Room No ID 
Houston. Texas 
JAckson 8-1601 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 33 



KLZ-TV dominates 



the Denver market! 
34 out of top 50 



13 out of top 15 Non-Network Shows 
11 out of top 15 Once-A-Week Shows 



NON-NETWORK FILM SHOWS 

Life of Riley 31.4 KLZ-TV 

Dr. Hudson's Secret Journal 29.2 KLZ-TV 

Highway Patrol 26.7 Stat. B 

I Led Three Lives .... 24.9 Stat. B 

Mr. District Attorney. . . 22.9 KLZ-TV 

Celebrity Playhouse. . . . 22.7 KLZ-TV 

Guy Lombardo 22.7 KLZ-TV 

Wild Bill Hickok 22.7 KLZ-TV 

Confidential File 22.4 KLZ-TV 

Stories of the Century. . . 22.2 KLZ-TV 

Liberace 21.5 KLZ-TV 

Range Rider 20.9 KLZ-TV 

Crunch and Des 20.4 KLZ-TV 

Buffalo Bill, Jr 20.2 KLZ-TV 

Studio 57 20.0 KLZ-TV 




ONCE-A-WEEK SHOWS 

Ed Sullivan 47.7 KLZ-TV 

$64,000 Question 46.5 KLZ-TV 

What's My Line 37.0 KLZ-TV 

George Gobel 35.4 Stat. B 

I Love Lucy 34.9 KLZ-TV 

Your Hit Parade. ... 33.4 Stat. B 

564,000 Challenge .... 32.7 KLZ-TV 

Life of Riley 31.4 KLZ-TV' 

Alfred Hitchcock 31.0 KLZ-TV 

Climax 30.7 KLZ-TV 

Disneyland 29.8 Stat. C 

Jack Benny 29.7 KLZ-TV 

Groucho Marx 29.4 Stat. B 

Phil Silvers 29.4 KLZ-TV 

Dr. Hudson's Secret Journal 29.2 KLZ-TV 



More Quarter Hour Firsts — from sign-on 
to sign-off — seven days a week — than all 
other Denver TV stations combined. 



CBS 



N D E N V 



See the complete story! Call your KATZ man 
or wire Jack Tipton, general sales manager, KLZ-TV 




TELEVISIO 



Page 34 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



ABC-TV, TvB STUDIES IN AUTOMOBILE FIELD 
SHOW STRONG STANDING FOR TELEVISION 

Network-sponsored Trendex survey finds that car dealers rank tv 
tops for drawing traffic to showrooms. TvB's questioning of cus- 
tomers draws even stronger conclusion. Both are part of major drive 
to convert automotive manufacturers to greater use of medium. 



THE DEALERS SAY . . . 

ALTHOUGH newspapers get the bigger slice 
of the national automobile advertisers' budget 
as compared to television, the automobile dealer 
is partial to the sight-and-sound medium in 
attracting customers to showrooms and as the 
preferred selling medium for the auto manu- 
facturer. 

A decided favor toward tv as the medium 
auto dealers like best is detailed in a new study 
prepared for ABC-TV by Trendex Inc. The 
data will be incorporated into an ABC-TV 
sales presentation that the network plans to 
unveil shortly before auto advertisers and their 
agencies in Michigan. 

At a news conference in New York held last 
week in advance of the survey's release today 
(Monday), Donald W. Coyle, director of sales 
development and research at ABC-TV, noted 
that the study was instituted after much com- 
ment on the effectiveness of tv as a medium 
had followed remarks made by Ernest Jones, 
president of MacManus, John & Adams, De- 
troit, before the Pittsburgh AAAA council 



Cadillac, were favorably inclined toward tv as 
a means of selling automobiles with the pattern 
indicating that "dealers who are supported by 
successful tv programs are the most enthusiastic 
toward tv." 

Nearly half of all the dealers contacted 
favored tv as the medium that brings in most 
showroom traffic and as the medium that 
should take first preference for factory adver- 
tising. In the third category, that of using one 
medium, 43% selected tv while 46% preferred 
newspapers. 

Breakdown on the question of the medium 
preferred by dealers as bringing in the most 
showroom traffic: tv, 48%; newspapers, 36%, 
and direct mail, 5%; if ony one medium was 
to be used: newspapers, 46%; tv, 43%, and 
direct mail, 5%; and in recommending media 
for factory advertising: tv, 49%; newspapers, 
37%, and direct mail, 8%. (The other three 
media scored negligibly in the survey.) 

Along with the survey results, ABC-TV dis- 
closed figures which showed that television re- 
ceives 28% of the automotive (national) ad- 
vertising budget while 50% goes to newspapers, 
2% for network radio, 14% for magazines and 



livan Show on CBS-TV) a breakdown on these 
dealers was offered. (Its ad budget on a com- 
bined basis: 63% to newspapers and 37% to 
tv.) Tv, however, scored among dealers with 
these results: for the showroom, 86%; as only 
medium, 71%, and as top medium preferred, 
74%. 

General Motors. Dealers rated third in 
"enthusiasm" for tv. (GM's budget last year: 
57% to newspapers and 19% to tv. Combined: 
75% to newspapers and 25% to tv.) Television 
was voted by 49% as the best for showroom 
traffic, 41% as the sole medium and 49% as 
the top medium preferred. (Chevrolet, which 
allocates 29% to tv and its combined news- 
paper-tv budget, scored 64%, 51% and 58% 
in the respective question categories.) 

ABC-TV has among its sponsors for next 
fall: Dodge Div. of Chrysler; American Motors; 
Chevrolet Div. of General Motors, and Ford. 

THE CUSTOMERS SAY . . . 

A NEW STUDY showing that television out- 
ranks newspapers — or any other medium— by 
almost 2 to 1 in getting prospective automo- 
bile purchasers into the showroom was re- 
vealed by Television Bureau of Advertising last 
week in special presentations to car makers and 
their agencies in Detroit. 

The study was made in more than 40 mar- 
kets in 26 states, with two-thirds of the inter- 
views conducted at automobile showrooms and 
the rest among people who had shopped for 
cars in the past few months. Approximately 



TARGET FOR TV: GIVEN THE CHANCE, IT CAN MOVE THOSE CARS 




[B«T, April 9, 21. Mr. Jones had questioned 
the ability of tv to move durable goods. 

Julius Barnathan, ABC-TV's manager of re- 
search who detailed results of the study to 
newsmen, emphasized that they come at a 
time when the auto industry is having its second 
highest year of passenger auto production in 
the last five years. 

The survey was conducted during the week 
of June 11, and covered interviews of 627 auto 
dealers in 16 major markets where newspaper 
penetration is the highest. The markets in- 
cluded Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Cincinnati, 
Cleveland, Columbus, Dallas-Fort Worth, Den- 
ver, Detroit, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Min- 
neapolis-St. Paul, Nashville. New York, Phila- 
delphia and Washington, D. C. 

Only dealers of the five top auto makers 
were surveyed: General Motors, Chrysler, Ford, 
American Motors and Studebaker-Packard. 
Three questions were asked of each of the 
dealers as to which form of national adver- 
tising did the best job in bringing customers to 
the showroom; if factory and dealers had only 
one kind of national advertising to use. which 
would he recommend, and how would he rank 
the six media (radio, newspapers, magazines, 
outdoor, direct mail and television) in the 
order of preference if he was making up the 
national advertising budget of the factory. 

It was revealed that all of the dealers, except 



6% for outdoor advertising. Mr. Barnathan 
pointed out that the tv figures include all costs 
(time and talent) of network and spot. 

Narrowing the results further to the Big 
Three in the auto industry, General Motors, 
Ford and Chrysler. Mr. Barnathan reported 
the following data from dealer groupings made 
in assaying survey results: 

Chrysler. These dealers favor tv most. 
(Chrysler's ad budget last year was 40% to 
newspapers and 42% to tv.) Using a combined 
newspaper-tv budget, the breakdown is 51% to 
tv and 49% to newspapers. Tv, moreover, was 
liked by 67% of the Chrysler dealers as doing 
the best job for the showroom (33% for news- 
papers — breakdown as to auto manufacture 
identity is confined to tv vs. newspapers, thus 
percentages add to 100%), 60% thought tv was 
the medium to use if the factory and dealer 
were restricted to one, and 69% named tv as 
the tops in preference (all six media were 
rotated in rank among the dealers so as to 
prevent bias). 

Ford (its ad budget last year was 52% to 
newspapers and 27% to tv). Combined basis, 
66% to newspapers and 34% to tv. Tv among 
Ford dealers scored as follows: for the show- 
room, 65%; as only medium, 50%, and as the 
top medium preferred, 61%. 

Because of the interest in Lincoln-Mercury 
(which sponsors the highly-successful Ed Sul- 



30^ of the 565 shoppers interviewed actually 
did buy cars. And 58% of the total said they 
came there because of commercials they'd seen 
on television, as against 32% who attributed 
their interest to newspaper ads. 

TvB President Oliver Treyz outlined high- 
lights of the study — conducted for TvB by the 
Institute for Motivational Research — in a pres- 
entation to some 365 automotive executives, 
advertisers and agencies in Detroit Thursday, 
and also in separate showings to individual 
advertiser-agency groups. 

Mr. Treyz stressed that auto makers, who 
put approximately twice as much into news- 
papers as into television last year, are "under- 
spending" in tv. "We believe," he said, "that 
the relatively light television promotion pro- 
vides a dangerously weak underpinning for the 
gigantic marketing task of 1957. 

"It is apparent that one of the nation's most 
dynamic industries — the automotive — views the 
nation's most dynamic advertising medium — 
television — as a supplementary rather than a 
primary sales vehicle. It seems to us that the 
big question which faces Detroit in its 1957 
model sales campaign is not nearly so much 
the share of sales established by the Buicks, 
Pontiacs, Mercurys and Chryslers, as it is the 
total sale of new cars, which, in turn, deter- 
mines the automobile production rate. 

"Automotive advertisers stand virtually alone 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 35 



Setting 
for 

sales! 





i 



n "San Francisco Beat/' even the very 
setting's exciting. Filmed on location 
in photogenic, steep-inclined San 
Francisco, it's a powerful, eye-filling 
show. . . combining the drama of real 
cases from the files of San Francisco's 
Police Department with the thrill of 
the chase through some of the world's 
dizziest, most breath-taking scenery. 
The uptilted streets ... the Golden Gate 
. . . Chinatown . . . the waterfront and 
Fisherman's Wharf . . . it's a setting that 
puts extra wallop into every half hour 
of this action-laden film series. 



And what a wallop the series packs! 
In the Albany-Schenectady-Troy 
area, "San Francisco Beat" is one of 
the top fifteen programs, drawing 
bigger audiences than such shows as 
Kraft Theater, Gobel, Martha Raye and 
Montgomery Presents. In film-happy 
Los Angeles, it's among the top ten 
syndicated films.* As "The Lineup" on 
the CBS Television Network, it has 
averaged a higher rating than "Dragnet" 
throughout the past season.** 
"San Francisco Beat" provides a hard- 
hitting setting for your sales messages. 
Get details and market availabilities 
from the people who bring you the 
fastest-moving films in all television... 




CBS TELEVISION FILM SALES, INC. 

Offices in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Detroit, Boston, San Francisco, St. Louis, 
Atlanta, Dallas. In Canada: S. W. Caldwell, Ltd. 




•ARB, latest available reports "Trendex, Oct. I9SS-M3V 1956 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



NEW SPOT 

Tv character keys all-media sales drive 

NOT ONLY does television drama set the theme for 
the upcoming major market tv campaign of Wynn Oil 
Co., Azusa, Calif., but the chief character of the new 
tv spot itself, "Auto Medic," sets the theme for copy 
in all other media, including radio, magazines, trade 
papers and point-of-sale. The national campaign will be 
placed by Kennedy, Walker & Wooten, Los Angeles, 
starting this month. 

Earl Kennedy, partner in the agency named by Wynn 
earlier this year, thought up "Auto Medic," who would 
use the company's oil additive, Wynn's Friction Proofing, 
to get rid of sludge and carbon and make cars feel 
healthy again. He reasoned that most people could 
understand this idea easily even though they could not 
comprehend the chemistry of engine combustion and 
how the product helps improve engine operation. 

The cartoon character, who is the hero of the suc- 
cessful operation on a "sick" car depicted in the tv spot, 
is being featured also in presentations to service station 
operators as part of the Wynn educational campaign to 
increase product identification. The tv spot will be used 
in one-minute, 20-second and 10-second versions. The 
animation was done by LaBrea Productions, Hollywood, 
under the supervision of Gail Papineau and his associ- 
ates, formerly of Kling Studios. 

Now being tested on KNXT (TV) Los Angeles, the 
Auto Medic spot opens with tense drama in a hospital 
operating room as the unseen patient on the operating 
table obviously is on the brink of expiration — from 
"auto anemia." Auto Medic enters with self-assured 
flourish, peers at the patient and with a groan of com- 
passion quickly diagnoses the illness as metal ulcers 
caused by "the usual sludge, gums and friction spots." 
Confirming his observation by several clinical tests, Auto 
Medic calls for "auto plasma" and the nurse gives him 
a can of Wynn's Friction Proofing. 

The patient recovers amid glad exclamations from the 
onlookers and is revealed to be a little car, now smiling. 
It zooms from the table and down a road, stopping at 
a light next to a little girl car and says: "Say, did I 
ever tell you about my operation?" After this line, the 
scene fixes on the stop light which becomes the round 
Wynn's Friction Proofing label. 



1 




in the allocation of the minor portion of their 
budgets to television. Among all national ad- 
vertising categories, they stand alone in the 
failure to follow the trend toward heavier and 
heavier television viewing." 

The showroom survey which TvB unveiled 
elicited not only car-shoppers' own reactions 
but also those of their wives, children and 
friends. Universally, it gave television a strong 
lead over newspapers as a prime factor in 
interesting them in new cars in the first place. 

Asked to indicate what led them to visit the 
showroom, 58% nominated television and 32% 
newspapers, giving tv a lead of 1.8 to 1 (10% 
said "neither," "don't know," or gave other 
answers). 

A breakdown of these answers according to 
make of car being shopped for showed tv with 
a 2.5-to-l lead over newspapers in the case of 
Ford products; 1.6-to-l ahead in the case of 
Chrysler makes, and 1.5-to-l ahead in the case 
of General Motors cars. 

The influence that wives exert also was ex- 
plored — with results that led TvB officials to 
conclude that the role of wives in car-buying 
is more influential than many people think. 
And the shoppers indicated, in 67% of the 



cases, that wifely interest was aroused through 
television. This compares with 17% attributed 
to newspapers, giving tv a lead of 3.9 to 1 
(16% gave other answers). 

Similarly, about 43% of those having chil- 
dren mentioned that the children had expressed 
interest concretely in new cars, and 83% of 
these attributed the interest to tv as against 
13% to newspapers, giving television a 6.4-to-l 
advantage (4% gave other answers). 

A total of 60% of the shoppers said they 
had heard friends discuss new cars. And of 
these, 63% attributed the friends' interest to 
television while 24% attributed it to news- 
papers, giving tv an advantage of 2.6 to 1 
(13% gave other answers). 

As a final query, interviewers played a 
"game" with the shoppers, asking how they 
would allocate a mythical $1 million budget 
among the four major media in order to reach 
the greatest number of "people like you" and 
bring them into the showroom. In this "allo- 
cation" television received 47% and newspapers 
26%, while the rest was divided almost evenly 
between radio and magazines. 

In the Detroit presentation, President Treyz 
was assisted by Gene Accas, TvB director of 



operations. W. D. Rogers Jr. of KDUB-TV 
Lubbock and KPAR-TV Sweetwater, Tex., 
chairman of the TvB board, introduced the 
presentation, which included, in addition to the 
auto shoppers' survey, much of the material 
shown earlier by TvB to advertiser, agency and 
membership meetings in Chicago and New 
York [B*T, April 23, May 28]. Norman E, 
(Pete) Cash, vice president, and George Hunt- 
ington, sales development director, also par- 
ticipated in the Detroit sessions. 

Similar presentations are slated in Los An- 
geles July 10 and San Francisco July 12. 

Dr. Leon Arons is TvB director of research. 

Admiral Corp. Places 
$2.5 Million Order 

IN what was described as "largest advertising 
schedule ever purchased on NBC-TV's partici- 
pating program," the Admiral Corp., Chicago, 
has placed an order amounting to almost $2.5 
million on the network's Today (Mon.-Fri., 7-9 
a.m. EDT) and Tonight (Mon.-Fri., 11:30 p.m.- 
1 a.m. EDT), starting Sept. 3. 

The NBC-TV order, which was disclosed si- 
multaneously with a 52-week purchase by 
Admiral of ABC Radio's Breakfast Club (see 
story, page 74), was announced last week by 
George H. Frey, vice president in charge of 
NBC-TV sales, who pointed out that the sched- 
ule marks Admiral's initial use of the network's 
participating programs. Through its agency, 
Henri, Hurst & McDonald, Chicago, Admiral 
has bought daily announcements on the two 
programs for 52 weeks, covering a total of 520 
participations. 

Newspaper Ad Rates Gain 
Over Circulation Increases 

AVERAGE net paid circulation of U. S. daily 
newspapers has increased 10.3% since 1946 
while their average open line rate has gone up 
52% and their average maximil rate up 37.8%. 

This difference between newspaper circulation 
gains and their increases in rates is shown in a 
study issued by Assn. of National Advertisers 
last week and described by ANA as "the most 
comprehensive report ever made on daily news- 
paper circulation and rate trends." 

Using an index of 100 as the 1946 base, the 
report shows that average net paid circulation 
of U. S. English-language dailies has increased 
steadily to 110.3 in 1956, while the average 
open line rate has gone to 152.0 and the average 
maximil rate to 137.8. The maximil rate rep- 
resents the cost of one line of advertising per 
million circulation at the open or flat line rate, 
which is the maximum rate charged for national 
or general advertising. 

Number of newspapers involved in this com- 
parison was 1,566 in 1956 as against 1,490 in 
1946. 

Carnation Boosts Chamberlin 

HUGH R. CHAMBERLIN has been ap- 
pointed associate advertising manager for Car- 
nation Co.'s evaporated milks, Paul H. Willis, 
vice president in charge of advertising, an- 
nounced last week. Mr. Chamberlin will assist 
E. A. Gumpert, general advertising manager 
for Carnation on dairy products, in the super- 
vision of advertising for Carnation evaporated 
milk and seven regional brands produced by 
the company. Prior to joining Carnation in 
Los Angeles, Mr. Chamberlin was associated 
with Procter & Gamble, where he helped in- 
troduce Pin-It home permanent, worked with 
Shasta cream shampoo and was assistant brand 
manager for Gleem toothpaste. 



Page 38 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



Stronger than ever 



The strongest, steadiest Pulse in the booming 
Pacific Northwest belongs to Radio KING. 

Pulse Inc. rates Radio KING first in the morning 
... in the afternoon . . . and, in the evening . . . 
seven days a week. 

This healthy report is from a 15 County Area 
Study taken by Pulse in March-April, 1956. The 
study measures radio audiences by time periods . . . 



both in-the-home and out-of-home . . . and covers 
all of Western Washington. 

Hypo your sales in the important Puget Sound 
market with Radio KING. Ask your Blair 
rep for details. 



50,000 Watts 
ABC— Blair, Inc. 



FIRST IN SEATTLE 

Radio KING 





EST. 1932 



A. 




Page 42 • July 2, 1956 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES — 

Revlon, Hal March Face 
Broadway Producers' Suit 

REVLON Inc., New York, the cosmetics manu- 
facturer which hypoed sales with its The $64,000 
Question on CBS-TV, found itself involved last 
week in a $250,000 suit that charges the firm 
with depriving two Broadway producers of the 
services of star Hal March. 

The producers, Alexander H. Cohen and 
Ralph Alswang, charged in New York Supreme 
Court that Revlon persuaded Mr. March to 
break his contract to star in a forthcoming 
comedy, "The Brass Section." The star, accord- 
ing to the complaint, was signed for the show 
on March 8 and was to receive 10% of the gross 
box office receipts, but was "intentionally and 
maliciously" induced to breach the agreement so 
that he could take on an additional tv program 
for the firm. Mr. March, however, stated that 
as of the present he was not going to do another 
tv show for Revlon. 

At the same time, the producers instituted a 
proceeding against Mr. March with the Ameri- 
can Arbitration Assn. The play was to have 
gone into rehearsal late next month. 

Revlon, which has 20 days to answer the 
complaint, said only that George Abrams, vice 
president in charge of advertising, had "cate- 
gorically denied all of the allegations." 

Mr. March was quoted variously as terming 
the suit as "ridiculous" in that Revlon used no 
coercion and as expressing himself "ready, will- 
ing and able" to start rehearsal no later than 
Aug. 15. Mr. March's attorney, Morton Becker 
of Jaffe & Jaffe, New York, told B»T that so 
far as he was informed, Mr. March was willing 
to star in the new Max Wilk comedy. Revlon's 
attorneys are Blumberg, Singer & Blumenthal, 
New York. 

In a statement Wednesday, Mr. Cohen de- 
clared that "if this sort of conduct is to be 
tolerated," a producer could spend a year in 
preparing a play, hiring his star and "plan pro- 
duction around him," only to find the actor "can 
disregard his commitments merely by saying 
that he no longer wishes to honor his contract." 
Mr. Cohen asserted that Mr. March, and his 
representatives, vacillated as to carrying out the 
contract dependent "upon the daily progress of 
his negotiations with Revlon." The complaint 
against Revlon was prepared by Milton R. Weir, 
attorney with Cohen & Alswang, New York. 

Slenderella Ups Budget, 
Buys CBS # ABC Radio Time 

SLENDERELLA INTERNATIONAL, which 
recently upped its radio budget to $1.92 mil- 
lion [B»T, June 4], last week added another 
$250,000 to the total by purchasing participa- 
tions on both CBS Radio and ABC Radio 
shows. On CBS — via its agency, Management 
Assoc. of Connecticut, Stamford — it signed a 
13 -week contract for three segments weekly of 
The Bing Crosby Show, The Mitch Miller 
Show and The Galen Drake Show. The con- 
tract, effective today (Monday), marks the first 
buy of Slenderella on CBS Radio, although it 
has bought time on both Columbia Pacific 
Network and local CBS stations. 

It also has purchased segments of ABC 
Radio's morning serial program, When a Girl 
Marries, for 26 weeks, effective Aug. 6 (see 
story, page 74). 

Meanwhile, CBS Radio also announced that 
Bronze Tan, a division of Shulton Inc., Clifton, 
N. J., through the Wesley Assoc. Inc., New 
York, had bought its first network radio cam- 
paign, effective last Friday. The suntan lotion 
will be featured on 15-minute portions of The 
Arthur Godfrey Show throughout July. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 




Baltimore market 

one station^ 

I 

delivers the most listeners 3 
at the lowest cost per thousa nd 

< 

1 A I C D D BALTIMORE'S BEST BUY , 

VV I D l\ REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR AND COMPANY 

Broadcasting • Telecasting July 2, 1956 • Page 43 

- 









NOBODY'S 

LISTENING 
BUT PEOPL 



4,115,000 

EVEBY 

MINUTE! 



Five days a week, 12:00 noon to 2:45 pm, cnyt 
an average of 4,115,000 people a minute listen 
attentively to CBS Radio. 

Mostly, they're homemakers, too busy for other 
advertising media. They're listening to the 
11 dramatic serials that are the strongest lineup 
in all daytime radio. 

In the course of one week, these programs reach 
one out of every four households in the U. S. 






From left to right: 

12:00 N. WENDY WARREN & THE NEWS 

12:15 PM BACKSTAGE WIFE 

12:30 PM ROMANCE OF HELEN TRENT 

12:45 PM OUR GAL SUNDAY 

1:00 PM ROAD OF LIFE 

1:15 PM AUNT JENNY 

1:30 PM YOUNG DR. MALONE 

1:45 PM GUIDING LIGHT 

2:05 PM RIGHT TO HAPPINESS 

2:15 PM SECOND MRS. BURTON 

2:30 PM THIS IS NORA DRAKE 



the right time to buy , 



THE CBS RADIO NETWORK 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



ARF STARTS STUDY 
OF COUNTY TV SETS 

Figures to be based on Census 
Bureau and Nielsen surveys. 
No definite release date set. 

THE Advertising Research Foundation last 
week began work on a project designed to 
produce individual county estimates of tele- 
vision households as of February 1956, similar 
to a tabulation released by ARF earlier this 
year [B»T, April JO] on tv households as of 
June 1955. The project will cost about $17,000, 
according to ARF, and is being underwritten 
by ABC, CBS-TV, NBC, NARTB and TvB. 

The ARF report will be based on informa- 
tion obtained on television sets in 1956 by 
the U.S. Bureau of the Census in conjunction 
with its Current Population Survey, the founda- 
tion reported. ARF's general plan is to com- 
bine this information with data from the 
Nielsen Coverage Service as of March 1, 1956. 

The statistical procedures to be employed 
are described as "similar" to those used in 
the earlier ARF tv household report, "U.S. 
Television Households by Region, State and 
County — June 1955." It was pointed out that 
"some modifications may be necessary." 

The foundation observed that it is "difficult" 
to predict the completion date of the project 
"before the census and Nielsen data are ex- 
amined in detail to determine whether any 
unusual statistical problems may be involved," 
and added: 

"If there are no unusual problems, then it 
is expected that county estimate computations 
will be completed by September. However, 
computation of standard errors depends in 
part on a calculation that only the Census 
Bureau can perform. Because of the heavy 
workload, including commitments to other 
U.S. government agencies, it is possible that 
the bureau may not be able to complete these 
calculations by the time the county estimates 
have been completed. Therefore, if ARF's 
technical committee decides that the standard 
errors should be included in the report, it may 
be that another month or two will be required 
for completion and publication of the report." 

ARF reported it has made arrangements 
with the Census Bureau to add tv household 
questions to its August 1956 Current Popula- 
tion Survey questionnaires, with the cost being 
defrayed by the aforementioned underwriters. 
ARF added that it "does not now contemplate 
computing individual county estimates based 
on the August data." 

Fried Named Doner V.P. 

HERB FRIED, account executive for W. B. 
Doner & Co., has been appointed vice presi- 
dent in charge of the advertising agency's Balti- 
more office, it was 
announced last 
week. 

Mr. Fried began 
his advertising ca- 
reer in 1946 with 
Foote, Cone & Beld- 
ing, Chicago, served 
in various depart- 
ments and was 
named account exec- 
utive in 1952. From 
1954 to 1955, he 
was an account ex- 
ecutive for Weiss 
and Geller, Chicago, 
and joined Doner in the same capacity in 1955. 




O LOR CAS 



Advance Schedule 
Of Network Color Shows 
(All times EDT) 

CBS-TV 

July 7 (7-7:30 p.m.) Gene Autry Show 
William Wrigley Jr. Co., through Ruth- 

rauff & Ryan. 

NBC-TV 

July 2-6 (3-4 p.m.) Matinee, participating 
sponsors (also July 9-13, 16-20, 23-27, 
30-31). 

July 4 (7:30-7:45 p.m.) J. P. Morgan 
Show, sustaining (also July 18). 
July 4 (9-10 p.m.) Kraft Television The- 
atre, Kraft Foods, through J. Walter 
Thompson (also July 11, 18, 25). 

July 7 (8-9 p.m.) Patti Page Show, par- 
ticipating sponsors. 

July 8 (5-5:30 p.m.) Zoo Parade, sustain- 
ing (also July 15, 22, 29). 
July 12 (10-11 p.m.) Lux Video Theatre, 
Lever Bros. Co., through J. Walter 
Thompson (also July 19, 26). 

July 15 (7:30-9 p.m.) Sunday Spectacu- 
lar, "The Bachelor," participating spon- 
sors. 

July 21 (8-9 p.m.) Julius La Rosa Show, 
participating sponsors (also July 28). 
July 22 (9-10 p.m.) Alcoa Hour, Alu- 
minum Co. of America, through Fuller, 
Smith & Ross. 

July 23 (8-8:30 p.m.) Producer's Show- 
case, "Rosalinda," Ford Motor Co., 
through Kenyon & Eckhardt and RCA 
through Kenyon & Eckhardt, Al Paul 
Lefton & Grey. 

July 29 (9-10 p. m.) Goodyear Playhouse, 
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., through 
Young & Rubicam. 

[Note: This schedule will be corrected to 
press time of each issue of B«T] 



MR. FRIED 



Ted Bates Announces Changes 
In Its Radio-Tv Department 

NEW assignments in the radio-tv department 
of Ted Bates, New York, were announced last 
week by James C. Douglass, vice president and 
director of the department. 

Changes include Herbert Gunter, vice presi- 
dent, who becomes director of television com- 
mercials in addition to continuing to work with 
copy and account groups and supervising all 
commercial film production; Thomas F. Mc- 
Andrews Jr., assistant vice president, who was 
named director of operations, supervising all 
programming and live commercial production; 
Thomas W. Hanlon who becomes assistant 
director of the film department, and Robert 
Margulies, formerly with Young & Rubicam, 
who was appointed a film producer. 

Brother Adv. Agency Expands 

THE D. P. Brother advertising agency, Detroit, 
has expanded its office space to 32,000 sq. ft. 
and combined its staff into two adjacent build- 
ings on the same floor level. The agency's 
offices in the General Motors Bldg., and the 
Argonaut Bldg., are connected by an overhead 
bridge. Other company offices are located in 
New York and Los Angeles. 



No Bait-Switch Ads 
On Networks, BBB Says 

INDISCRIMINATE attacks on the telecasting 
industry for so-called "bait-switch" advertising 
is unjustified because these criticisms fail to 
distinguish between network practices and those 
followed by some independent stations, accord- 
ing to the June issue of the News Bulletin of 
the National Better Business Bureau Inc. 

The lead article in the publication declared 
the bureau "knows of no case where 'bait- 
switch' advertising has appeared on any of the 
three national tv networks." It pointed out 
that each of the three tv networks maintains 
full-time continuity departments or divisions 
which are "scrupulous in their denial of broad- 
casting facilities to fraudulent advertisers," and 
each network rejects "very substantial revenue 
in the form of proffered advertising which is 
held to be not in the public interest." 

"The continuity acceptance experts of the 
three networks are in daily contact with the 
National Better Business Bureau," the article 
revealed. "During 1955, for example, they 
sought the assistance of the bureau in determin- 
ing the reliability of advertisers and their prod- 
ucts or the validity of proposed advertising 
claims in more than 700 instances." 

The article said that "the only instances" of 
"bait-switch" broadcasts specifically cited in 
criticisms coming to the NBBB's attention have 
occurred on non-network broadcasts. It added 
that the bureau "does not suggest that all, or 
a majority, of local stations, independent or 
otherwise, have been guilty of such practices." 

Judge Rules Out Indictment 
Charging False Advertising 

INDICTMENT of four men on charges of 
"bait" advertising on television was dismissed 
in Chicago .--Ccin task Court June 22 as "too 
vague and evasive." 

Judge Wilbert F. Crowley quashed the in- 
dictment against Irving Rocklin, president of 
Rockling Irving & Assoc.; Ira Segall, copywriter 
at the agency; Irwin Cole, president of Cole- 
Finder (automobile agency), and Kenneth Sieg, 
former Cole-Finder salesman. Judge Crowley 
claimed the indictment contained "no partic- 
ulars for an attorney to defend against." 

The indictment was returned by the Cook 
County (111.) grand jury after an investigation 
by the Chicago Better Business Bureau, which 
cited tv commercials aired on WNBQ (TV) 
that city Feb. 25 and 27. The original charges 
were broadened to include the advertising 
agency at the request of State Attorney John 
Gutknecht [At Deadline, May 28; B«T, 
April 30]. 

Kenyon & Eckhardt to Open 
Regional Office in Atlanta 

KENYON & ECKHARDT, New York, is estab- 
lishing a regional advertising office at 795 
Peachtree St., N.E., Atlanta, according to Wil- 
liam B. Lewis, president. Until now, K&E 
has maintained a service operation in Atlanta 
for the handling of Lincoln-Mercury Dealers 
Assoc. 

Other accounts to be serviced initially in 
the new office are Pepsi-Cola, RCA television 
and radio sets, RCA-Whirlpool washers, dryers 
and other appliances. "K&E's move to Atlanta 
is in recognition of our clients' needs for strong 
regional merchandising support. Also K&E ex- 
pects to service out of its Atlanta office new ad- 
vertisers with top calibre advertising developed 
especially for their needs," Mr. Lewis said. 



Page 46 



July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 




Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 47 



RCA INTRODUCES A COMPLETELY 



"FAMILY" OF AUDIO 



A model to "fit" every station requirement.. . 



ALL HAVE "BUILT-IN" POWER SUPPLIES, 
MONITORING AMPLIFIERS AND SPEAKER RELAYS 

Here is a "family" of three consolettes that give you the 
widest choice of facilities ever offered. All have printed- 
wiring amplifiers in modular construction, providing the 
utmost in circuit uniformity and performance. Each model 
has its own "built-in" power supply (the BC-6A has two). 
Each has built-in monitoring amplifiers and speaker relays. 

INSTALLATION IS QUICK, EASY... INEXPENSIVE 

The "self-contained" feature of all three models makes 
them easy to install. There is no need for costly external 
wiring and "hunting" for a place to mount such items as 
power supplies, monitoring amplifiers and speaker relays. 
The reduction of external wiring minimizes the chance of 
stray hum pick-up greatly improving system performance. 

CONVENIENT OPERATION 

The low height of each consolette affords maximum studio 
visibility ... no stretching to observe cues. Relaxed wrist 
comfort is provided by mixer controls on the right slant . . . 
at the right position above the desk top. RCA-developed 




Tilt-forward front panel 
permits quick accessibility to mixer 
pads and spring contacts; makes 
maintenance easy. 



finger-grip knobs provide convenient, positive control and 
are color coded for "function identity." 

EASE OF MAINTENANCE 

Routine maintenance time is reduced by the quick accessi- 
bility of all components . . . easy-to-clean mixer pads, 
simple-to-adjust leaf-spring contacts on key and push- 
button switches. This is achieved by a snap-off top cover 
and a tilt-forward front panel, in addition to strategic 
placement of components. 

RCA MATCHED STYLING PERMITS EXPANDABILITY 

Styled with 30-degree sloping panels which match previ- 
ous equipments such as the BC-2B consolette, BCM-lA 
mixer, and compatible among themselves, a wide range of 
augmented facilities is possible. Paired BC-5As provide 
dual channel operation and extended facilities. Addition 
of the BCM-lA mixer to any of these consolettes is simple 
and provides added microphone inputs. 

THEY WORK WELL INTO CUSTOM ARRANGEMENTS 

Simple functional design and "engineered" compactness 
makes any number of custom installation arrangements 
possible. A custom "U" arrangement of two BC-5As flank- 
ing a BCM-lA mixer is possible. The 30-degree front 
panels match the slope of video control equipment making 
them suitable for use in television studio custom applica- 
tions as well as in radio. 



Ask your RCA Broadcast Sales Representative 
for detailed information 




RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

BROADCAST AND TELEVISION EQUIPMENT • CAMDEN, N. J. 





CONSOLETTES 



BC-5A NINE INPUTS 2 turntahles , 2 remote 
-facilities for ^^^^^posit.on's. Built-in 
HOeS ' 1 ^HasHy expanded fo/dual channel use %Q -~ 
{^X^ ^Sf "custom touch $375 
when paired with existing BC-2B s 





fo" d°.l cha^.l use by p...«* «* °C 5A. 



*1095 




rp-RA TWENTY-TWO INPUTS , ^ ,. - 

remote 

SiSS^^S^HSS^^^^^^-- .1750" 

gram monitoring and talkback, one tor cue g 

*£,*« T«^-P«V« '» «*W with ° Ut mttCe - 



Amoco Buys More Spots 



LATEST RATINGS 



AMERICAN OIL Co. will up its radio-tv 
budget for the year in excess of $1 million by 
buying 14 five-minute spots on NBC Radio's 
Monitor each weekend starting next Saturday. 
The segments will feature a "top tune of the 
week," up-to-the-minute sports news with NBC's 
Lindsey Nelson and a series of Bob and Ray 
commercial satires. In addition to the Monitor 
purchase, Amoco will launch a 26-week spot 
radio campaign in 44 eastern markets, starting 
today (Monday), through its agency, The Jo- 
seph Katz Co., New York and Baltimore [At 
Deadline, June 18]. Firm also is retaining its 
Friday 10:30-11 p.m. slot on CBS-TV with a 
summer replacement show for Person-to-Person 
(see story, page 98). 

Lorillard Appoints Yellen 

MANUEL YELLEN, west coast sales man- 
ager, P. Lorillard Co. (Old Gold, Kent cig- 
arettes and other tobacco products), New York, 
last week was named to succeed Alden James, 
who recently resigned as advertising director 
of the firm. 

Mr. Yellen has been with Lorillard since 
1933, beginning as a salesman, later became 
divisional sales manager at Cleveland, and, 
after service in the U. S. Navy, was appointed 
by Lorillard as head of the firm's west coast 
sales operations. 

D # Arcy Names Four V.P/s 

ELECTION of four new vice presidents and 
one new director was announced last week by 
D'Arcy Adv. Co., New York. Newly-elected 
vice presidents are Gene M. Cowall, art direc- 
tor, St. Louis; Dean Coyle, art director, New 
York; Lee White, account supervisor on Ander- 
son, Clayton & Co. Foods Div. and Vern East- 
man, manager of Los Angeles office. 

The new director is James B. Orthwein, who 
has been a vice president of the company for 
10 years in the St. Louis office. 

13th Year for Gillette 

GILLETTE CO., Boston, has renewed spon- 
sorship of the Cavalcade of Sports on NBC- 
TV and NBC Radio on Friday, starting at 10 
p.m. EDT, effective Sept. 27, it was announced 
last week by George H. Frey, vice president 
in charge of sales for NBC-TV. Maxon Inc. is 
the agency. According to NBC-TV, this marks 
the 13th year that the boxing bouts have been 
sponsored by Gillette on the network, starting 
on a local basis on WNBT (TV) New York 
(now WRCA-TV) on Sept. 29, 1944. 

AGENCY APPOINTMENTS 

Halco Products Inc. (Southern Gold orange 
juice, other citrus products), Orlando, Fla., ap- 
points Kenyon & Eckhardt, N.Y. 

A. Goodman & Sons Inc. (noodles, other prod- 
ucts), Long Island City, N. Y., formerly handled 
by Al Paul Lefton Inc., NY., to Doyle Dane 
Bernbach, N.Y. 

Gibraltar Savings & Loan Assn., Beverly Hills, 
Calif., names Dreyfus Co., L.A. 

SPOT NEW BUSINESS 

American Tobacco Co. (Lucky Strike ciga- 
rettes), N. Y., through BBDO, N. Y, preparing 
52-week television spot announcement campaign 
in limited number of markets. 



ARB 



TOP TV SHOWS, JUNE 1-7 











FNer- 








Rank Program 


Sponsor 


Agency 


work 


otations 


_. 

1 ime 


Kating 


1. 


Ed SulMvan 


Lincoln-Mercury 


Kenyon & Eckhardt 


CBS 


180 


Sun., 8-9 
Tues., 10-10:30 


50.5 


2. 


$64,000 Question 


Revlon 


BBDO 


CBS 


165 


48.7 


3. 


1 Love Lucy 


Procter & Gamble 


Biow 


CBS 


155 


Mon., 9-9:30 


46.5 




General Foods 


Young & Rubicam 




157 






4. 


$64,000 Challenge 


P. Lorillard 


Young & Rubicam 


CBS 


111 


Sun 10 10-30 


41 .0 




Revlon 


C. J. LaRoche 












' What's My Line? 


Jules Montenier 


Earle Ludgen 


CBS 


70 


Sun., 10:30-11 


36.8 


5. • 


Remington-Rand 


Young & Rubicam 




111 








You Bet Your Life 


DeSoto 


BBDO 


NBC 


157 


Thurs. 8-8:30 


36.8 


7. 


December Bride 


General Foods 


Benton & Bowles 


CBS 


183 


Mon., 9:30-10 


34.8 


8. 


I've Got a Secret 


R. J. Reynolds 


Wm. Esty 


CBS 


170 


Wed., 9:30-10 


34.3 




Perry Como 


Armour 


Tatham-Laird 


NBC 


81 


Sat., 8-9 


33.0 




Dormeyer 
Gold Seal 


John W. Shaw 
Campbell-Mithun 




82 
86 










International 


Foote, Cone & Belding 




90 






9. - 




Cellucotton 












Noxzema 
Toni 


SSC&B 
North Adv. 




95 
91 








Alfred Hitchcock 


Bristol Meyers 


Young & Rubicam 


CBS 


110 


Sun., 9:30-10 


33.0 




Lineup 


Brown & Williamson Ted Bates 


CBS 


176 


Fri., 10-10:30 


33.0 



Rank 
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 



Program 
Ed Sullivan 
$64,000 Question 
I Love Lucy 
$64,000 Challenge 



Viewers 
48,370,000 
39,540,000 
38,400,000 
33,460,000 



Rank Program 

5. Perry Como 

6. George Gobel 

7. December Bride 



Viewers 
31,830,000 
28,330,000 
27,530,000 



Copyright, American Research Bureau Inc. 



Rank Program Viewers 

8. I've Got a Secret 27,400,000 

9. You Bet Your Life 27,350,000 
10. What's My Line? 26,440,000 



NIELSEN 



TOP TV SHOWS (TWO WEEKS ENDING MAY 26) 

t Total 
Audience 
Tv Homes 











Net- 


No. of 




Reached 


Ran 


k Program 


Sponsor 


Agency 


work 


Stations 


Day & Time 


(000) 


1. 


$64,000 Question 


Revlon 


BBDO 


CBS 


165 


Tues., 10-10:30 


15,403 


2. 


Ed Sullivan Show 


Lincoln-Mercury 


Kenyon & Eckhardt 


CBS 


180 


Sun., 8-9 


15,184 


3. 


1 Love Lucy 


Procter & Gamble 


Biow 


CBS 


155 


Mon., 9-9:30 


14,235 




General Foods 


Ycung & Rubicam 




157 






4. 


December Bride 


Genera! Foods 


Benton & Bowles 


CBS 


183 


Mon., 9:30-10 


12,994 


5. 


Lux Theatre 


Lever Brothers 


J. Walter Thompson 


NBC 


129 


Thurs., 10-11 


12,374 


6. 


Ford Theatre ' 


Ford Motor Co. 


J. Walter Thompson 


NBC 


156 


Thurs., 9:30-10 


1 1 ,936 


7. 


Cavalcade of Sports 


Gillette 


Maxon 


NBC 


161 


Fri., 10-10:45 


1 1 ,790 


8. 


Disneyland 


American Motors 


Geyer & Brooks, Smith, 


ABC 


180 


Wed., 7:30-8:30 


11,790 








French & Dorrance 












American Dairy 


Campbell -Mi thun 














Derby Foods 


McCann-Erickson 










9. 


Jack Benny Show 


American Tobacco 


BBDO 


CBS 


172 


Sun., 7:30-8 


11,644 


10. 


Perry Como Show 


Armour 


Tatham-Laird 


NBC 


81 


Sat., 8-9 


11,534 






Dormeyer 


John W. Shaw 




82 








Gold Seal 


Campbell-Mithun 




86 










International-Cellu- 


Foote, Cone & Belding 




90 










cotton 
















Noxzema 


Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell 


95 












& Bayles 














Toni 


North Adv. 




91 









X Average 


Audience 
















Tv Homes 


Reached 




* Total Audience % 




* Total Audience % 


Rank 




(000) 


Ran 


k of Tv Homes 


Reached 


Ran 


k of Tv Homes Reached 


1. 


$64,000 Question 


14,235 


1. 


$64,000 Question 


43.7 


1. 


$64,000 Question 


40.4 


2. 


1 Love Lucy 


13,213 


2. 


Ed Sullivan Show 


43.2 


2. 


1 Love Lucy 


37.2 


3. 


December Bride 


12,045 


3. 


1 Love Lucy 


40.0 


3. 


December Bride 


34.3 


4. 


Ed Sullivan Show 


11,717 


4. 


December Bride 


37.0 


4. 


Ed Sullivan Show 


33.4 


5. 


Ford Theatre 


10,731 


5. 


Lux Theatre 


35.8 


5. 


$64,000 Challenge 


30.9 


6. 


GE Theatre 


10,512 


6. 


Cavalcade of Sports 


34.2 


6. 


Ford Theatre 


30.4 


7. 


$64,000 Challenge 


10,439 


7. 


Ford Theatre 1 


33.8 


7. 


GE Theatre 


30.2 


8. 


I've Got a Secret 


10,330 


8. 


Perry Como Show 


33.3 


8. 


I've Got a Secret 


29.8 


9. 


Cavalcade of Sports 


10,184 


9. 


Disneyland 


33.2 


9. 


Cavalcade of Sports 


29.5 


10. 


Dragnet 


10,147 


10. 


Jack Benny Show 


33.2 


10. 


A. Hitchcock Presents 


29.4 



[Details on programs in preceding three tables, but not listed in top table] 



General Electric Theatre 


General Electric 


BBDO 


CBS 


153 


Sun., 


9-9:30 


$64,000 Challenge 


P. Lorillard 


Young & Rubicam 


CBS 


111 


Sun., 


10-10:30 




Revlon 


C. J. LaRoche 










I've Got a Secret 


R. J. Reynolds 


Wm. Esty 


CBS 


170 


Wed., 


9:30-10 


Dragnet 


Liggett & Myers 


Cunningham & Walsh 


NBC 


169 


Thurs. 


, 8:30-9 


Alfred Hitchcock Presents 


Bristol-Myers 


Young & Rubicam 


CBS 


110 


Sun., 


9:30-10 



1" Homes reached by all or any part of the program, except for homes viewing only 1 to 5 minutes. 
t Homes reached during the average minute of the program. 

* Percented ratings are based on tv homes within reach of station facilities used by each program. 

Copyright 1956 by A. C. Nielsen Co. 



TOP RADIO SHOWS (2 WEEKS ENDING MAY 12) 



Rank Program 
Evening, Once-a-week 

1. Dragnet 

2. Our Miss Brooks 

3. You Bet Your Life 

4. Two for the Money 

5. News & Gene Autry 

6. Edgar Bergen 

7. People Are Funny 



8. Truth or Conse- 



9. 
10. 



quences 
Edgar Bergen 
True Detective 
Mysteries 



Sponsor 

RCA 

Toni 

DeSoto 

P. Lorillard 

William Wrigley Jr. 

CBS Columbia 

RCA 

Brown 8c Williamson 

Tobacco Co. 
Realemon 
RCA 

Realemon 

Brown & Williamson 
Participating 



Net- 
Agency work 

Kenyon & Eckhardt NBC 

North Adv. CBS 

BBDO NBC 

Lennen & Newell CBS 

RuthraufF & Ryan CBS 

Ted Bates CBS 

Kenyon & Eckhardt NBC 
Ted Bates 

Rutledge & Lilllanfeld 

Kenyon & Eckhardt NBC 
Rutledge & Lillianfeld 

Ted Bates CBS 

sponsors MBS 



No. of 

Stations Day & Time 

(Average for All Programs) 



185 
203 
194 
203 
191 
200 
177 



177 

200 
489 



Tues., 8-8:30 
Sun., 8-8:30 
Wed., 9-9:30 
Sun., 8:30-9 
Sun., 6-6:30 
Sun., 7-8 
Thurs., 8-8:30 



Wed., 8-8:30 

Sun., 7-8 
Mon., 8-8:30 



Homes 
(000) 
(662) 

1,656 
1,608 
1,608 
1,561 
1,324 
1,277 
1,277 



1,230 

1,183 
1,183 



(Continues on page 52) 



Page 50 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




many more favorites. 

Represented nationally by JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 51 



NIELSEN (Cont'd from page 50) 



Evening, Multi-Weekly 

1. News of the World 

2. One Man's Family 

3. Lowell Thomas 



Weekday 
J. Helen Trent 

2. Wendy Warren 

3. Wendy Warren 

4. Wendy Warren 

5. Helen Trent 



6. 
7. 

8. 
9. 



Guiding Light 
Arthur Godfrey 

Arthur Godfrey 
Young Dr. Malone 



10. Young Dr. Malone 
Day, Sunday 
1. Woolworth Hour 



2. 
3. 



Robert Trout News 
News 



Day, Saturday 

1. Gunsmoke 

2. Robert Q. Lewis 

3. Allan Jackson — 
News 



Miles Labs 

Participating 

United Motor Service 
Division of 
General Motors 



Geoffrey Wade 

sponsors 

Campbell-Ewald 



Toni 

General Foods 
Standard Brands 

Philip Morris 

Hazel Bishop 

Toni 

General Foods 

Procter & Gamble 
American Home 

Products 
Campana 
Chesebrough 
Toni 

Carter Products 



Same sponsors as above 



North Adv. 
Young & Rubicam 
Ted Bates 

The Biow Co. 

Raymond Spector 

North Adv. 
Young & Rubicam 

Compton 

Young & Rubicam 

Erwin Wasey 

J. Walter Thompson 

North Adv. 

Ted Bates 



F. W. Woolworth 
General Motors 



Liggett & Myers 

Milner 

Chevrolet 



Lynn Baker 
Campbell-Ewald 



Cunningham & Walsh 
Gordon Best 
Campbell-Ewald 



NBC 
NBC 
CBS 



CBS 
CBS 
CBS 
CBS 
CBS 



CBS 
CBS 

CBS 
CBS 



CBS 
CBS 



CBS 
CBS 
CBS 



(Average for All Programs) (710) 

194 Mon.-Fri., 7:30-45 1,419 

182 Mon.-Fri., 7:40-8 1,372 

198 Mon.-Fri., 6:45-7 1,088 



(Average for All Programs) 



185 
190 
191 
189 
185 



143 
201 

195 
112 
189 
186 



Tues. & Thurs. & Mon. & 
Wed., alt. wks., 12:30-45 
Alt. Days, Mon.-Fri., 
12-12:15 

Alt. Days, Mon.-Fri., 
12-12:15 

Alt. Days, Mon.-Fri., 
12-12:15 

Alt. Weeks, Mon. 
& Wed., Tues. & 
Thurs., 12:30-45 
Mon.-Fri., 1:45-2 
Thurs., 10:30-45 



Alt. Days, Mon.-Fri., 
1 :30-45 



(1,183) 
1,797 

1,797 

1,797 

1,797 

1,750 



(Average for All Programs) 
198 Sun., 1-2 
164 Sun., 10-10:15 

(Average for All Programs) 
200 Sat., 12:30-1 
198 Sat., 11:55 -noon 
178 Sat., 12-12:05 



1,750 
1,703 

1,656 
1,656 



1,656 
(474) 
1,041 
851 
851 

(662) 
1,561 
1,277 
1,230 



Copyright 1956 by A. C. Nielsen Co. 



PULSE 



TOP REGULARLY SCHEDULED ONCE-A-WEEK-TV SHOWS 



Program 

1. $64,000 Question 

2. Ed Sullivan 

3. I Love Lucy 

4. You Bet Your Life 

5. $64,000 Challenge 

6. Perry Como 



7. Disneyland 



8. Jack Benny 

9. Jackie Gleason 

10. December Bride 

11. Dragnet 

12. Climax 

13. GE Theatre 

14. What's My Line? 

15. Phil Silvers 

16. Fireside Theatre 

17. Caesar's Hour 



Sponsor 
Revlon 

Lincoln-Mercury 

Procter & Gamble 

General Foods 

DeSoto 

P. Lorillard 

Revlon 

Armour 

Dormeyer 

Gold Seal 

International 

Cellucotton Prod. 
Noxzema Chemical 

Toni 

American Motors 

American Dairy 
Derby Foods 
American Tobacco 
Buick Div. of 

General Motors 
General Foods 
Liggett & Myers 
Chrysler 
General Electric 
Jules Montenier 
Remington Rand 
R. J. Reynolds 
Amana Refrig. 
Procter & Gamble 
American Chicle 



Helene Curtis 
Remington Rand 

18. This Is Your Life Procter & Gamble 

19. Lux Video Theatre Lever Brothers 

20. Medic Dow Chemical 



20. Robt. Montgomery 



Procter & Gamble 

General Electric 
S. C. Johnson 

Schick 



Agency Network 
BBDO CBS 
Kenyon & Eckhardt CBS 
Biow CBS 
Young & Rubicam 
BBDO NBC 
Young & Rubicam CBS 
C. J. LaRoche 

Tatham-Laird NBC 
John W. Shaw 
Campbell-Mithun 
Foote, Cone & Belding 

Sullivan, Stauffer Colwell 

& Bayles 
Weiss 8. Geller 
Geyer & Brooks, ABC 
Smith, French & Dorrance 
Campbell-Mithun 
McCann-Erickson 
BBDO CBS 
Kudner CBS 



No. of 
Stations 
May Apr. 

165 165 

180 180 

155 155 

157 157 

157 157 

111 111 



Benton & Bowles 
Cunningham & Walsh 
McCann-Erickson 
BBDO 

Earle Ludgin 
Young & Rubicam 
Wm. Esty 

Maury, Lee 8t Marshall 
Compton 

Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample 
Earle Ludgin 
Young & Rubicam 
Benton & Bowles 
J. Walter Thompson 
MacManus, John & 

Adams 
Dancer- Fitzgerald- 
Sample 
BBDO 

Needham, Louis & 

Brorby 
Warwick & Legler 



81 
82 
86 
90 



CBS 
NBC 
CBS 
CBS 
CBS 

CBS 

NBC 
NBC 



NBC 
NBC 
NBC 



NBC 



81 
82 
86 
90 



95 95 

91 91 
180 180 



172 172 

187 187 

183 181 

157 169 

162 162 
153 

70 70 

111 111 
169 
151 

132 132 
116 



133 133 
129 129 
81 

84 

84 
98 



Day & Time 

Tues., 10-10:30 
Sun., 8-9 
Mon., 9-9:30 

Thurs., 8-8:30 
Sun., 10-10:30 

Sat., 8-9 



Wed., 7:30-8:30 



Sun., 7:30-8 
Sat., 8-8:30 

Mon., 9:30-10 
Thurs., 8:30-9 
Thurs., 8:30-9:30 
Sun., 9-9:30 
Sun., 10:30-11 

Tues., 8-8:30 

Tues., 9-9:30 
Mon., 8-9 



Wed., 9:30-10 
Thurs., 10-11 
Mon., 9-9:30 



Mon., 9:30-10:30 



Rating 

May Apr. 

44.5 45.4 
44.2 44.3 

40.6 40.2 

35.7 36.3 
33.2 30.1 

33.1 32.8 



32.7 34.8 



32.7 33.4 
32.0 ,32.5 



31.0 
30.8 
29.9 
29.5 
29.4 



27.7 
27.1 



31.4 
30.2 
32.9 

29.1 



28.5 — 



28.4 



27.0 27.2 
26.9 26.5 
26.7 — 



26.7 



TOP TEN REGULARLY SCHEDULED MULTI-WEEKLY SHOWS 



1. 


Mickey Mouse CI 


ub segmented sponsors and various 


ABC 


94 


94 


Mon.-Fri., 5-6 


19.7 


19.9 






agencies 
















2. 


Guiding Light 


Procter & Gamble 


Compton 


CBS 


113 


113 


Mon.,-Fri., 12:45-1 
Mon.-Fri., 4-4:15 


11.8 


12.1 


3. 


Search For 
Tomorrow 


Procter & Gamble 


Biow 


CBS 


125 


125 


11.0 


10.8 


4. 


Love of Life 


American Home 
Prod. 


Ted Bates 


CBS 


153 


153 


Mon.-Fri., 12:15-12:30 


10.5 


10.3 


5. 


Valiant Lady 


General Mills 


D-F-S 


CBS 


97 


97 


Mon.-Fri., 12-12:15 


10.1 


9.9 




Toni 


North Adv. 




71 


71 












Wesson Oil 


Fitzgerald 




99 


99 












Scott Paper 
participating spor 




70 


70 








6. 


Arthur Godfrey 


sors and agencies 


CBS 


99 


99 


Mon.-Thurs., 10-11:30 


9.6 


9.7 


7. 


News Caravan 


Plymouth 


N. W. Ayer 


NBC 


116 


116 


Mon.-Fri., 7:45-8 


9.4 


9.8 






R. J. Reynolds Tob. 


Wm. Esty 












8. 


Big Payoff 


Colgate-Palmolive 


Wm. Esty 


CBS 


121 


121 


Mon.-Fri., 3-3:30 


9.1 


9.3 


9. 


CBS-TV News 


Whitehall 
American Tobacco 


SSC&B 


CBS 


75 


75 


Mon.-Fri., 6:45-7 


9.1 


9.2 


10:, 


Pinky Lee 


participating sponsors and agencies 


NBC 


70 




Mon.-Fri., 5-5:30 


9.0 





Standard Brands (Hunt Club Dog Food), N. Y., 
planning extension of television spot announce- 
ment campaign in three markets — Bay City, 
Mich.; Toledo, Ohio, and Fort Wayne, Ind. — 
starting July 2 for about 20 weeks. Ted Bates 
Inc., N. Y., is agency. 

Clairol Inc. (hair preparation), N. Y., will 

sponsor The Rosemary Clooney Show for 
"double exposure" each week on WPIX (TV) 
and WRCA-TV, both New York. Exact time 
and date program will be presented will be 
announced shortly. Agency is Foote, Cone & 
Belding, N. Y. 

Quaker City Chocolate & Confectionery Co., 

Philadelphia, has bought CBS-TV Film Sales 
Brave Eagle tv film series in seven markets, 
starting in early fall. Through Adrian Bauer 
& Alan Tripp Inc., Phila., Quaker City will 
sponsor series in New York, Philadelphia, De- 
troit, Cleveland, Chicago, Pittsburgh and either 
Baltimore or Washington. 

NETWORK NEW BUSINESS 

Union Carbide & Carbon Corp., N. Y., has 

signed as third advertiser for Omnibus on ABC- 
TV Sunday evenings, starting in the fall. Other 
advertisers on show continue to be Aluminium 
Ltd. and J. P. Stevens & Co. Union Carbide's 
agency is J. M. Mathes Inc., N. Y. Network 
expects to sell fourth portion of show shortly. 

Gulf Oil Corp. (Gulf-Spray), Pittsburgh, spon- 
soring this summer 30 7 Vi -minute portions of 
CBS Radio daytime programs, divided among 
Romance of Helen Trent, Young Dr. Malone 
and This Is Nora Drake, effective June 25. 
Agency: Young & Rubicam, N. Y. 

Mogen David Wine Corp., through Weiss & 
Geller, both Chicago, signed for ABC-TV's 
Treasure Hunt, new $25,000 tv quiz program 
starring Jan Murray. Premiere for Treasure 
Hunt, scheduled Fridays, 9-9:30 p.m. EST, 
is Sept. 7. 

William Wrigley Jr. Co. (chewing gum), through 
Ruthrauff & Ryan, both Chicago, has dropped 
option on Sunday, 6-6:30 p.m. EDT time slot 
on CBS Radio (vacated this spring following 
Gene Autry's retirement from radio) and pur- 
chased strip of five quarter-hour daytime shows 
for 52 weeks on CBS. New series, titled Just 
Entertainment, will be heard Mon.-Fri., 2:45- 
3 p.m. EDT, effective today (Monday), replac- 
ing Aunt Jenny, which moves to 1:15-1:30 p.m. 
EDT. Star of new series is Pat Buttram, veteran 
of old Autry show. 

Simoniz Co., Chicago, and American Tobacco 
Co., N. Y., both through Sullivan, Stauffer, 
Colwell, & Bayles, N. Y., will sponsor Best in 
Mystery, which occupies the summertime spot 
of Big Story on NBC-TV (Fri., 9-9:30 p.m. 
EDT), starting July 13. 

NETWORK RENEWALS 

Aluminum Co. of America, through Fuller 
& Smith & Ross, both Pittsburgh, has renewed 
NBC-TV's Alcoa Hour (alternate Sundays, 9- 
10 P.M. EDT) for another year, effective Oct. 
14. 

Toni Co., Div. of Gillette Co., through North 
Adv., both Chicago, has renewed three CBS 
Radio daytime serials for another year, effec- 
tive June 25. Programs are Romance of Helen 
Trent, Young Dr. Malone, and This Ip Nora 
Drake. 

Liggett & Myers (L&M cigarettes), through 
Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, both N. Y., will con- 
tinue to sponsor Gunsmoke throughout summer, 
Saturdays, 10-10:30 p.m. EDT on CBS-TV. 
Cigarette manufacturer announced earlier it 



Page 52 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




you rself 



these questions before you buy a syndicated film show 




i DEPENDABLE i 




2 MERCHANDISE ABLE ? 



+ 




3 PROMOTABLE 




4 ADAPTABLE i 



Q- 

Q- 
Q- 



Is it a dependable program — a tried and proven audience builder of the 
same high quality every week ? 



2. Is it a merchandiseable program — will it work for you right through 
to point-of -pur chase? 

3. Is it a promotable program— will it attract a steady following readily 
and hold it week after week ? 

Qp 4. Is it an adaptable program — flexible enough to suit programming needs 
in a variety of time periods? 

A. The answer is YES— every time— when you select an audience-proven syndicated 
hit from NBC Television Films. Every show is a top television attraction— tailored to 
TV's exacting requirements and starring outstanding personalities. You're always sure of a 
program that will build large and loyal followings quickly— when you buy from NBC 
Television Films. 

663 Filth Avenue In New York; Merchandise Mart in Chicago; Taft Building in Hollywood. In Canada: RCA Victor, 225 Mutual Street, Toronto. 



i Badge 714 



2. Steve Donovan, 
Western Marshal 

3 Crunch and Pes 

4 The Great 
Gildersleeve 

NBC Television 
Films 

Programs for 
All Stations- 
All Sponsors 

A DIVISION OF K AG RAN CORPORATION 




would continue alternate sponsorship of Do 
You Trust Your Wife? on Tuesdays, 10:30-11 
p.m. EDT, also on CBS-TV. 

Radio Bible Class, Grand Rapids Mich., through 
John M. Camp & Co., Wheaton, 111., has re- 
newed Radio Bible Class on ABC Radio, (Sun., 
8-8:30 a.m. EDT), effective July 1. 

A&A PEOPLE 

Joseph R. Burton, associate copy director, J. 
Walter Thompson Co. Chicago office, Willard 
J. Loarie and John V. Sandberg, account rep- 
resentatives, all elected vice presidents. Wil- 
liam Rega, fadio-tv director at Campbell- 
Mithum Inc., Chicago, to Thompson, same 
city, as creative writer. 

William E. Palmer, merchandising executive 
at William Esty Co., N. Y., has been appointed 
vice president of agency. Before joining Esty 
last year, Mr. Palmer was general manager of 
consumer products, Ball Bros. Co., Muncie, 
Ind. George T. Hobgood, account executive, 
Manning Public Relations, N. Y., to William 
Esty Co., N. Y., as member of publicity staff. 




MR. PALMER 



MR. CLELAND 



Philip A. Cleland, vice president, account super- 
visor on General Foods Corp. and member of 
plans board, Benton & Bowles, N. Y., to C. J. 
LaRoche & Co., N. Y., as account supervisor. 

William H. Steele, vice president and senior 
account executive on Pepsodent tooth paste, 
L. A. office of Foote, Cone & Belding, to N. Y. 
office as account group manager for Rhein- 
gold beer. 

John O'Brien, formerly with Ruthrauff & Ryan 
and also head of own marketing counseling 
service, and Bridg Griswold, formerly account 
executive on National Sugar, Fletcher D. Rich- 
ards, N. Y., appointed account supervisor, Re- 
gent Cigarettes and account executive, package 
products, respectively, at MacManus, John & 
Adams, N. Y. 

U. E. Gallanos, The Biow Co., N. Y., to Joseph 
Katz Co., as account executive. 

Graham Rohrer, formerly director of specialty 
sales and advertising, Georgia-Pacific Plywood 
Co., N. Y., to Needham, Louis & Brorby Inc., 
N. Y., as account executive. Barker Lockett, 
formerly senior writer at Leo Burnett Co., Chi- 
cago, to radio-tv department of Needham, 
Louis & Brorby Inc., same city. Robert E. In- 
galls, formerly with Grant Adv. Inc., Chicago, 
to Chicago copy department of N L & B. 

Burton Kessler, office manager at Beltone Hear- 
ing Aid Co., Chicago, appointed advertising 
and promotion manager of firm. 

Henry George, assistant copy chief, Frank 
Block Assoc., St. Louis, named account execu- 
tive, succeeding Jack M. Rafield, vice president 



and account executive, resigned to return to 
N. Y. 

Philip B. Hinerfeld, account executive, The 
Biow Co., N. Y., to Kenyon & Eckhardt Inc., 
N. Y., in similar capacity. Albert F. Reming- 
ton, previously advertising manager of Stude- 
baker-Packard Corp.'s Packard-Clipper Div., 
and Bruce E. Miller, formerly advertising-mer- 
chandising director for Plymouth Div. of Chrys- 
ler Corp., to new Detroit office of K&E. Al- 
berta Gilinsky, formerly freelance research and 
psychology teacher at Tufts and Vassar Col- 
leges, to K&E, N. Y., as assistant account re- 
search supervisor. Harold Wallis, formerly 
with Geyer Adv., N. Y., and Richard Whit- 
son, formerly with McCann-Erickson, N. Y., 
also have joined agency as art director and 
assistant tv art director respectively. John 
Hickey, media department of N. Y. office^ 
transferred to Detroit as media buyer. 

Fremont J. Knittle, vice president in charge of 
marketing and merchandising, Robert Orr & 
Assoc., N. Y., to Ted Bates & Co., as market 
development manager. 

Russell R. Parker, formerly vice president and 
copy chief at Burnet-Kuhn Adv. Co., Chicago, 
to copy staff of Aubrey, Finlay, Marley & 
Hodgson Inc., same city. 

Mary Forrest, North Adv., Chicago, to Gor- 
don Best Co., that city, as timebuyer. 

Russ Nordstrom to Jackson, Haerr, Peterson 
& Hall Inc., Peoria, 111., as art director of agen- 
cy's Minneapolis office. 

Wallace J. Gordon, Ruthrauff & Ryan Inc., 
Chicago, to creative department of Walker B. 
Sheriff Inc., same city, as copy group-super- 
visor. 

Michael Hitzig, public relations director and 
advertising manager, Lambretta Div., The In- 
nocenti Corp., to publicity and promotion dept., 
Grey Adv., N. Y. 

Rolf Jensen, formerly with Biow Co., N. Y., 
to Warwick & Legler, N. Y., as art director. 

Robert C. Wilson, advertising department, J. 
L. Hudson Co., Detroit department store, to 
creative staff of Zimmer, Keller & Calvert Inc., 
Detroit. 

Nancy Webb, formerly with Bernard L. Lewis, 
N. Y., to BBDO, N. Y., in public relations 
department as publicity account executive for 
Maine Sardine Industry. 

Clare Acton, formerly copywriter with Chicago 
Tribune, and Montgomery Ward & Co., to copy 
department of Waldie & Briggs Inc., Chicago. 

Mrs. Janice Stapleton, Screen Gems, Mrs. Anita 
Fisher, Al Paul Lefton Co., and Nan Braman, 
McManus, John & Adams, Detroit, to copy staff 
of J. M. Mathes, N. Y., agency. John Burt, 
public relations officer, Brookhaven National 
Laboratory, Upton, L. I., to Mathes public rela- 
tions department. 

James M. Mathes, chairman, J. M. Mathes, 
N. Y., advertising agency, elected director of 
Otarion Inc., Dobbs Ferry, N. Y., manufacturer 
of hearing aids, acoustical testing devices and 
other electronic products. 

A&A SHORTS 

Foote, Cone & Belding will open Detroit office 
in next few months to handle advertising for 
Ford's new medium-priced automobile, now 
being designed and engineered. 

Rocklin Irving & Assoc., Chicago, has an- 




AN INTRODUCTORY tv spot and news- 
paper advertising campaign for Spud cig- 
arettes [B»T, June 25] is discussed by (I to 
r) Roger M. Greene, director of advertising 
for Philip Morris Inc.; David Ogilvy, presi- 
dent of Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, advertis- 
ing agency for Spud, and Joseph F. Cull- 
man III, executive vice president of Philip 
Morris. Initial advertising on tv and in the 
press for the new Philip Morris product 
will appear the week of July 23 on the 
West Coast and in Hawaii and Alaska. 



nounced resignation of Cole-Finder Mercury 
(Chicago automobile dealer) account. 

Roxie Bell, 21 -year-old student at Fresno State 
College, Calif., chosen by Assn. of Advertising 
Men & Women from among 56 top advertising 
seniors, representing colleges 'from coast to 
coast, as outstanding advertising student in 
America, 1956. 

Research Co. of America, N. Y., distributing 
15th annual edition of Brewing Industry Survey 
giving sales, consumption, production and other 
figures and data on industry in U. S., Canada 
and Mexico. 

Frank B. Sawdon Inc., N. Y., agency for Robert 
Hall Clothes, moved to larger quarters at 
60 E. 56th St., N. Y. Telephone: Plaza h 
2156. Move was stimulated, agency says, by 
increased activity of Hall account. Robert Hall 
plans to open additional 22 outlets in 17 cities 
coast-to-coast, bringing total number of stores 
to 240 in 140 cities. 

Fairfax Adv., N. Y., has retained Monroe B. 
Scharff & Co., 270 Park Ave., N. Y., as public 
relations counsel. 

Remington Arms Co., Bridgeport, Conn., elect- 
ed subscriber to Advertising Research Founda- 
tion, N. Y. 

Wellman-Buschman Co., Cleveland, elected to 
membership in American Assn. of Advertising 
Agencies. 

Compton Adv. Inc., N. Y., moved to 625 Madi- 
son Ave. Telephone: Plaza 4-1100. 

McKim Adv. Ltd., Toronto, moved to 1407 

Yonge St. 

Albert Frank-Guenther Law Inc., N. Y., has 

opened branch in L. A., under direction of 
Russell H. Clevenger, transferred from N. Y. 
New office is at 1308 Wislhire Blvd. 

Aubrey Williams Adv. Inc., New Orleans, 
moved to 923 Barracks St. 



Page 54 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




MAXIMUM AUDIENCE PENETRATION 



x 





■ 



... and that's exactly what 
WPRO-TV (channel 12, Providence, 
R.I.) delivers in a Southeastern 
New England area of over j million 
television homes. WPRO-TV offers 
survey-proved Maximum Audience 
Penetration of not one, but three 
major markets - PROVIDENCE, R. I., 
plus FALL RIVER and NEW BEDFORD, 
MASS. For proof, ask BLAIR-TV! 
For results, use WPRO-TV. 



WPR 



[few ■ 



PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND 



Ask your Blairrnan 







CHANNEL 

12 

316,000 WATTS 




NTA TELLS ABOUT ITS 

New York conference sketches 
broad outline of film-for-time 
arrangement, said to have 50 
stations signed, 25-35 others 
in prospect for October start. 

PLANS of the long-heralded NTA Film Net- 
work were disclosed last Thursday by Ely A. 
Landau, president of National Telefilm Assoc., 
New York, parent company, at a news confer- 
ence last week in New York. 

A broad outline of the network plan was 
presented by Mr. Landau during testimony 
before the Senate Commerce Committee in 
Washington two weeks ago [B*T, June 25]. 
During last week's news conference he answered 
reporters' questions on details. He insisted his 
new operation constitutes "a fourth television 
network," though he acknowledged to several 
unconvinced newsmen that it was not a net- 
work in the conventional sense of the word. 

He reported that 50 stations have signed 
affiliation agreements, and expected to have be- 
tween 75 and 85 affiliates by October, when the 
film network will begin operation. He said the 
station client list is expected to cover 60-75% 
of the country's tv homes, pointing out that 
contracts have not been signed as yet with sta- 
tions in the 12 top markets having four or more 
tv outlets. Mr. Landau listed Cincinnati, 
Denver, San Diego, Richmond and Savannah as 
some of the markets in which the film network 
will operate, but did not specify call letters. 
A client list, he said, will be released in a few 
weeks. 

Under NTA's film network plan, affiliates 
will be given a station library of 500-800 films, 



FILM NETWORK 

including features, serials and short subjects, in 
exchange for a minimum of one and one half 
hours of time weekly which NTA will offer for 
sale to national advertisers. Mr. Landau re- 
vealed that the time will vary from market to 
market but will be "prime feature film time." 
Most of the contracts, he said, will be for 78 
weeks. 

Under questioning, Mr. Landau revealed that 
neither the library to be turned over to stations 
nor the option time programming will include 
the feature films produced by 20th Century-Fox, 
J. Arthur Rank, David O. Selznick or the Para- 
mount short subjects library. He said the 
affiliates' library will consist of other features 
and short subjects NTA already has, or is in the 
process of acquiring. He reported the option 
time programming will be "first-run superspec- 
taculars" of "a quality never before available to 
tv on a continuous programming basis." He in- 
dicated the time period would be filled with 
"quality feature films," and said he would be 
"more specific" on the subject in a week. 

In larger markets, such as New York and 
Los Angeles and perhaps others, the NTA Film 
Network is in the process of developing a 
"multi-affiliation" concept, Mr. Landau said. 
Without going into much detail, Mr. Landau 
said that in New York, for example, the NTA 
Film Network might sign contracts with two 
affiliates, under which the same feature film 
could be played at the same time, giving a 
sponsor a "saturation" pattern applicable in a 
large market. 

The network, Mr. Landau stated, will tap 
program sources outside of the parent company 
to obtain the "best programming." He stressed 
the point that the film network is "completely 



autonomous" from the parent company, and 
NTA will continue to make its film program- 
ming available to its syndication clients. 

At the outset, he said, the network will supply 
only film programming, but added that "we are 
exploring and do expect to program live major 
sporting events" and "we expect to supply an 
up-to-the-minute major news service on film." 

The question was raised whether NTA in- 
tended to enter the station ownership field, and 
Mr. Landau said it was NTA's "hope" to be "in- 
volved in multiple station ownership before 
the year 1956 draws to a close." He did not 
elaborate on this point. 

Officers of the NTA Film Network will be 
similar to those of NTA with Mr. Landau as 
president; Oliver A. Unger, executive vice presi- 
dent; Harold Goldman, vice president, and 
Edythe Rein, vice president and secretary. In 
addition, the operating head of the film network 
will be Raymond E. Nelson, vice president and 
general manager. 

Screen Gems' 'Lancers' 
Sold to General Foods 

CLAIMING a new high in national sales for 
any tv organization, Columbia Pictures' tv sub- 
sidiary, Screen Gems Inc., has sold the Herbert 
B. Leonard production Tales of The 77th Ben- 
gal Lancers to the Jello Div. of General Foods 
Corp. for 1956-57 season it was announced 
Thursday in Hollywood by Ralph Cohn, vice 
president and general manager of Screen Gems. 
New series makes the ninth Screen Gems pack- 
age to be sold for network telecast next season. 
Lancers will be scheduled Sundays, 7-7:30 p.m. 
John H. Mitchell, vice president in charge of 
sales for Screen Gems, and Rob Erickson, vice 
president of Young & Rubicam, Jello agency, 
concluded negotiations. 

Producer Leonard also will have two other 
Screen Gem packages on the networks next 
season. His Adventures of Rin Tin Tin will be 
sponsored on ABC-TV by National Biscuit Co., 
and Circus Boy will be sponsored on NBC-TV 
by Reynolds Metals Co. Other Screen Gems 
package for next season include filmed portion 
of CBS-TV Playhouse 90, Ford Theatre on 
ABC-TV, Father Knows Best on NBC-TV for 
Scott Paper Co., Tales of the Texas Rangers 
on CBS-TV for General Foods and Captain 
Midnight on CBS-TV for Ovaltine. Screen 
Gems currently has eleven other programs in 
spot syndication field. 

'Dr. Christian' Sales Made 

REGIONAL and station sales for Ziv Televi- 
sion Programs' new Dr. Christian series were 
announced last week by M. J. Rifkin, vice 
president in charge of sales for Ziv Tv. 

Total number of markets on the regional 
transactions was not available pending station 
clearances, but Hekman Biscuit Co., Grand 
Rapids, Mich., has signed for its entire mid- 
west marketing area, with Detroit, Cleveland, 
Toledo, Grand Rapids, and Youngstown al- 
ready set. Adolph Coors Co. (Coors beer) 
has bought the series for the entire Rocky 
Mountain area, plus five Texas markets. 

Film Firm Holds Seminars 

A WEEKLY SERIES of television film semi- 
nars, to which advertisers and agencies are 
invited, is being conducted by Keitz & Herndon 
Film Co., Dallas. The Dallas staff of Ruthrauff 
& Ryan attended the first session a fortnight 
ago. At a typical session, visitors watch a dem- 
onstration of each step in the production of a 
filmed television spot. 




A WAR\fl/icX * . . 
|j NEWPORT NSWS 




You Beach the Home-Polks 
When You Hide the "Locals' 



It had an 18.2 rating in February 1956 Telepulse. 

It is available for Class "C" Participations 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, 4:30- 
5:00 P.M. (Sorry, Thursday is sold.) 

It is VARIETY SHOW . . . WTAR-TV's own 
low-cost, spritely half-hour that's doing such "nip- 
ups" for Advertisers that it takes two people to 
sort the fan mail ! 

TALENT . . . Em-Ceed by Jeff Dane, singing 
personality who's been on "The Steve Allen Show", 
"Toast of the Town", "All Star Review." He's 
abetted by lovely Ruth Raye, the combo and a 
host of local talent. 

To get the full story of VARIETY SHOW that 
sells WTAR-TV's five city* market . . . write or 
call your Petry man or WTAR-TV, Norfolk, Va. 





CHANNEL 



3 



NORFOLK.VA. 



Represented by Edward Petry & Co. , Inc. 



Page 56 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



60 seconds is all it takes. . . 




For centuries man tried unsuccessfully to 
fly. Yet, in less than 60 seconds of staying 
aloft with their heavier-than-air machine, 
the Wright Brothers made history. Man- 
kind was no longer earthhound. 

Today, to get your sales campaign off the 
ground and winging — whether you're sell- 
ing transportation . . . for a time-saving 
business trip to the North, or a flying vaca- 



tion plan to the South — or any other service 
. . . 60 seconds is all it takes on Spot Radio. 

Spot Radio costs less to reach more of your 
potential customers . . . whoever they are 
. . . wherever they might be ... at the pre- 
cise time and place of your choice. 

60 seconds — or less is all it takes to sell more 
with the right, bright buy — Spot Radio. 



WSB Atlanta 

WFAA Dallas-Fort Worth 

WIKK Erie 

KPRC Houston 

WJIM . Lansing 

KARK Little Rock 

WISN Milwaukee 



KSTP Minneapolis-St. Paul 

WTAR Norfolk 

WIP Philadelphia 

WRNL Richmond 

KCRA Sacramento 

WOAI San Antonio 

KFMB San Diego 



KMA Shenandoah 

KTBS Shreveport 

KVOO Tulsa 

ABC Pacific Radio 

Regional Network 

Texas Quality Network 



R«pr*MAt*d by 



EDWARD PETRY & CO., inc. 

THE ORIGINAL STATION REPRESENTATIVE 
NEW YORK • CHICAGO • ATLANTA • DETROIT • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO • ST. LOUIS 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 57 



FILM 



PROGRAM SERVICES 



NATIONWIDE WIRE NETWORK IN PROSPECT 
UNDER PLAN SPARKED BY TELEPROMPTER 

Members of broadcasting industry would have instantaneous com- 
munication system at command for number of uses. One of most 
interesting: adaptation to national rating setup giving verdict on a 
show 15 minutes after it's aired. 



KRON-TV Buys Warner Films 

IN A TRANSACTION estimated at almost $1 
million, KRON-TV San Francisco last week 
purchased the Warner Bros, library of feature 
films and cartoons from Associated Artists 
Productions, New York. Bob Rich, AAP gen- 
eral sales manager, who announced the sale, 
noted that the library currently is sold in 40 
markets. 

Negotiations on the transaction, said to be 
KRON-TV's largest film purchase, were con- 
ducted by Norman Louvau, KRON-TV sales 
manager, and Robert Kronenberg, AAP western 
division manager. The sale included three groups 
of Warner features, comprising 174 films; 337 
Warner cartoons, and 234 "Popeye" cartoons. 

FILM PEOPLE 

Leo Salkin, UPA Pictures writer, cartoonist 
and director, UPA Pictures, Burbank, Calif., 
named managing director of UPA Pictures 
Ltd., London. 

Fred Ahem, recently in executive capacity with 
RKO Pathe in New York, appointed assistant 
supervisor of television operations for RKO 
Radio Pictures' television film service unit, 
Culver City, Calif. 

Clyde L. Krebs, formerly sales promotion man- 
ager and account executive at Sarra Inc., Chi- 
cago, appointed vice president in charge of 
Chicago operations for Galbreath Picture 
Productions Inc., Fort Wayne, Ind. He will 
headquarter in Board of Trade Bldg., 141 W. 
Jackson Blvd. 

Hal Davis, formerly head of West Coast Adv. 
and previously with KVAR (TV) Mesa-Phoe- 
nix, to John A. Ettlinger Assoc., Hollywood, 
western states film distributor. He will handle 
agency sales of syndicated film properties in 
Los Angeles and San Francisco and will be 
station account executive in southwestern U. S. 

James J. Kelly, formerly merchandising man- 
ager of WABC-TV New York, appointed ac- 
count executive in commercials division of 
Guild Films Co., N. Y. Geoffrey Bernard, pre- 
viously head of sales for Associated Rediffu- 
sion, London, named sales representative in 
Britain for Guild Films. 

William Kirshner, formerly producer-director- 
writer at WKAR-TV East Lansing, Mich., to 
Capital Film Productions, same city, in simi- 
lar capacity. 

Grant Atkinson, formerly head of tv depart- 
ment, Campbell-Mithun Inc., Chicago, signed 
by Fred A. Niles Productions, Chicago, as 
writer-producer for series of industrial films. 

FILM SALES 

Screen Gems Inc., NY., announces sale of 
"Hollywood Movie Parade" package of 104 
Columbia Pictures' feature films to 25 addition- 
al stations. Total sales on package now number 
63. 

Cheryl Tv Corp., Hollywood, has sold tv pack- 
age of 20 feature movies in 20 new markets in 
past 60 days, making total sales in 141 markets 
for subsidiary firm of Realart Pictures Corp., 
which handles theatrical reissue of Universal 
films. 

Sterling Brewers Inc., Evansville, Ind., in its 
first tv advertising effort, has purchased MCA 
TV Film Syndication's The Rosemary Clooney 
Show for six southern and midwestern markets. 
Sterling will sponsor series for 52 weeks in 
Indianapolis, Evansville, Nashville, Tenn., 
Chattanooga, Tenn., Louisville, Ky., and Terre 
Haute, Ind. Agency is Smith, Benson & Mc- 
Clure, Chicago. 



FORMATION of a nationwide, privately- 
owned broadcasting industry wire communica- 
tions network appeared closer to reality this 
week with the announcement that an organiza- 
tion committee, comprising some of the na- 
tion's leading broadcasters, has been estab- 
lished. 

The announcement was made last week and 
followed a closed meeting earlier last month 
in Washington. 

The prospective private wire communica- 
tions system is planned to provide facilities 
interconnecting radio-tv stations, networks, sta- 
tion representatives, advertising agencies and 
programmers. The estimated $3.5 million non- 
profit system would be financed cooperatively 
by the users, with Western Union furnishing 
the equipment and wire facilities. The idea 
was sparked by TelePrompTer Corp., maker 
of visual prompting aids for performers on 
television or those making public addresses. 
The proposed system would be called the Pro- 
gram Communications Wire Assn. 

Expected to report back in a month or six 
weeks on questions of incorporation, finance, 
and operation, the organizational committee 
comprises the following: 

Henry Grossman, CBS; W. D. (Dub) Rogers, 
KDUB-TV Lubbock, Tex.; Fred Houwink, 
WMAL-AM-FM-TV Washington, D.C.; Wil- 
liam Hedges, NBC; Kenyon Brown, KFEQ-TV 
St. Joseph, Mo.; C. Howard Lane, KOIN-AM- 
TV Portland, Ore.; William H. Fay, WHAM- 
AM-TV Rochester, N. Y.; John Fetzer, Fetzer 
Broadcasting Co.; Donald H. McGannon, West- 
inghouse Broadcasting Co.; Payson Hall, Mere- 
dith Publishing Co. stations; Ernest Lee 
Jahncke, ABC; Merle Jones, CBS; Edward 
Codel, Katz Agency; Leonard Reinsch, Cox sta- 
tions, Peter Levathes, Young & Rubicam, and 
Edward L. Saxes, CBS. Irving B. Kahn, presi- 
dent of TelePrompTer Corp., was chosen as 
temporary chairman. 

Messrs. Lane, Houwink and Brown are 
chairman of their respective network affiliates 
committees. 

Within the next two weeks, Western Union 
personnel throughout the nation will call on 
stations to study traffic loads and cost of pres- 
ent systems which would be supplanted by the 
proposed association wire. Notification of this 
survey will be sent to affiliates by their respec- 



COST CUTTER 

AT THE Washington demonstration a 
fortnight a,go, Irving B. Kahan, Tele- 
PrompTer president, listed what he said 
were conservative estimates of how the 
proposed Program Communications Wire 
Assn. would cut message costs. 
. He said ABC, CBS and NBC now were 
averaging a minimum of $1 per message 
using present internal communications. 
If they used the new system, their average 
message cost would be cut to 47.7 cents 
initially. After the system was in full 
operation, the average cost would be re- 
duced to 27 cents. 



tive networks this week. Results of the survey 
will be collated by Western Union and reported 
back to the organizational committee next 
month. Meanwhile, similar studies will be made 
among representatives, agencies, advertisers and,, 
networks. 

Similar to other private line communicar 
tions systems used in the banking and aeronau- 
tical industries (and by a number of major 
manufacturers), it is estimated the system would 
utilize 35,000 miles of line to link 500 cities. 
Five message centers would be established — 
in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas 
and Atlanta. Flexibility would be assured so 
that any subscriber could send a message to 
any other individual subscriber or to multiples 
or to all. Punched tape would be used to 
speed messages. The system could be used, 
it was explained, for time clearances, orders, 
messages, etc. The possibility that it could be 
used for an instantaneous rating service was 
also raised. 

Mr. Kahn told B*T that after the system 
was fully operating, he envisioned many uses for 
it beyond that of a rapid message exchange for 
time clearances and other such traffic. It would 
be ideally adaptable to a national rating setup 
to provide ratings much faster and from a bigger 
sample of homes than existing services provide. 

Mr. Kahn said the TelePrompTer company 
had already perfected a small device which 
could be placed in selected homes and would 
forward television tuning information from 
the individual set to a central point. The tuning 
information collected almost instantaneously 
from sample homes in each market could then 
be transmitted through the communications net- 
work to a tabulating center in New York. It ■ 
is Mr. Kahn's estimate that within 15 minutes 
after a given program's conclusion a rating 
would be obtainable, with perhaps as many as 
50,000 homes in the total national sample. 

Cost of operation of the communications 
network would be about $1.5 million yearly, 
it was estimated. Savings over present use of 
teletype service is clearly indicated, it was ex- 
plained. 

TelePrompTer has shown its proposals to 
members of the Radio-Television Executives 
Society in New York and before an NARTB 
convention last year. "This intra-industry pri- 
vate wire will be infinitely faster than any 
other service now available and, because of 
its automatic design, considerably less expen- 
sive," Mr. Kahn commented. "It provides the 
means for quick transmission of integrated 
data. Further, we anticipate that the use of 
the system will lead to standardization of cer- 
tain routine messages, thus providing basic 
savings to the industry." 

PROGRAM SERVICE PEOPLE 

John Coburn Turner, 41, assistant director of 
Ford Foundation Tv-Radio Workshop and ad- 
ministrator of Omnibus show, died June 22 in 
St. Luke's Hospital, N. Y., after brief illness. 

Mark Knight, regional membership executive 
for Associated Press in California, Arizona 
and Nevada, appointed correspondent in Fres- 
no, Calif., with responsibility for area radio 
stations and newspapers. 



Page 58 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



The Fund for the Republic is pleased to announce 
the Winners of the 1956 



ROBERT E. SHERWOOD AWARDS 




for television programs 
dealing with 
freedom and justice 



to the National Broadcasting Company's 

production of ALCOA'S 

TRAGEDY IN A TEMPORARY TOWN 

PRODUCER Herbert Brodkin 

director Sidney Lumet 

writer Reginald Rose 



THE BEST NETWORK 
DRAMA 
$20,000 



to (he National Broadcasting Company's 
THE BEST NETWORK production of Armstrong Circle Theatre's 

DOCUMENTARY I WAS ACCUSED 

$20 000 producer David Susskind 

1 director William Corrigan 

writer Jerome Coopersmith 



THE BEST PRODUCTION 
BY AN INDEPENDENT STATION 

$15,000 



to WAAM-TV, Baltimore, Maryland 
for its production 
DESEGREGATION: BALTIMORE REPORT 

PRODUCER Herbert B. Cahan 

director Kennard Calfee 

writer Mrs. Gray Johnson Poole 



Honorable Mention 



OMNIBUS: 

Constitution 

Columbia Broadcasting 

System 
KRAFT THEATRE: 

One 

National Broadcasting 
Company 

PHILCO PLAYHOUSE: 
A Man Is Ten Feet Tall 
National Broadcasting 
Company 

PAGEANT: 

In Freedom 

KOMO, Seattle, 

Washington 
IN THE MINDS OF MEN 

KPIX, San Francisco, 

California 



THIS IS OUR FAITH 
— March 28, 1956 
WATV, Newark, N. J. 

TWIN CITY 
HEART BEAT: 

The Invisible Fence 
KEYD, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

CAMERA THREE SERIES 
Columbia Broadcasting 
System 

FRONTIERS 

OF FAITH SERIES 

National Broadcasting 

Company 

FRONTIER SERIES 
National Broadcasting 
Company 



Jurors: 



Kermit Bloomgarden 
Buell G. Gallagher 
Robert M. Purcell 
Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt 



Gilbert Seldes 
Robert Taft, Jr. 
Harrison Tweed 
Philip H. Willkie 



The Awards for television programs dealing with freedom and justice 
presented on commercial television between October 1, 1955 and May 31, 
1956 are in memory of Robert E. Sherwood, until his death a Director of 
the Fund for the Republic and a valiant champion of American liberties. 
The Awards will be made again next year, for programs presented between 
October 1, 1956 and May 31, 1957. The Fund for the Republic is a non- 
profit corporation devoted to increasing public understanding of the 
principles set down in the Constitution and its Bill of Rights. 



THE FUND FOR THE REPUBLIC, INC. 

60 East 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y. 

PAUL G. HOFFMAN, Chairman of the Board ROBERT M. HUTCHINS, President 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 



— PROGRAM SERVICES 

Radio-Tv Code Established 
For N. Y. City Departments 

TELEVISION and radio code has been adopted 
by New York City to guide its various depart- 
ments on negotiations with agencies and broad- 
casting program producers, packagers, networks 
and stations seeking the cooperation of the city 
on program material. Called a code of mu- 
nicipal television and radio standards, it is be- 
lieved to be the only broadcasting code of its 
kind in any municipality in the country, accord- 
ing to a spokesman for New York's Mayor 
Robert F. Wagner. 

The code, which was adopted by the Mayor's 
Television & Radio Advisory Committee on 
June 22, specifies that "each department or 
agency of the city is the sole authority for the 
approval of its cooperation with a television and 
radio producer, network, station, program de- 
veloper or author." The code is intended as a 
guide for each head of a department or agency 
and for the mayor's radio and television aide, 
Arnold Cohan, who will be available for con- 
sultation and advice to all heads of departments 
and agencies. 

The adoption of the code came as an after- 
math of a controversy last fall when radio-tv 
producer Theodore M. Granik was granted 
rights to produce a tv film series based on New 
York City department files [B«T, Oct. 31, 1955]. 
Objections were made by unidentified tv film 
producers and by local newspapers, citing Mr. 
Granik's long-time friendship with Mayor 
Wagner as a possible reason for choosing Mr. 
Granik as producer without benefit of competi- 
tive bids. Another furor erupted when New 
York's police commissioner said he would refuse 
access to his department's files on the grounds 
that the only cases that would interest a tv pro- 
ducer would be dramatic ones, leading perhaps 
to distortion. Mayor Wagner shortly thereafter 
called a halt to the Granik project and appointed 
a committee to explore the situation. 

Among the members of the Mayor's Televi- 
sion & Radio Advisory Committee, which 
drafted the new code, are: G. Tyler Byrne, Na- 
tional Assn. of Broadcast Employes & Techni- 
cians; Ted Cott, DuMont Broadcasting Corp.; 
Sam Cook Digges, general manager, WCBS- 
TV New York; the Rev. Timothy Flynn, Arch- 
diocese of New York; Seymour Siegel, director 
of communications for the City of New York; 
Robert L. Stone, WABC-TV New York; Gordon 
Gray, WOR-TV New York; Thomas B. Mc- 
Fadden, WRCA-TV New York. 

TelePrompTer Promotes Tyrrell 
To Assistant to President 

THE ELECTION of Albert R. Tyrrell as as- 
sistant to the president and vice president of 

TelePrompTer Corp. 
was announced last 
week by Irving B. 
Kahn, president. Mr. 
Kahn said that Mr. 
Tyrrell "will be con- 
cerned solely with 
the functions of 
management and the 
implementation of 
policy." 

In his new posi- 
tion, Mr. Tyrrell will 
headquarter in New 
York. He formerly 
was in charge of 
the firm's Washington, D. C. office and prior 
to that was in the aviation industry. 




GOVERNMENT 




MOST of the questioning from House Antitrust Subcommittee during FCC's testimony 
last week came from (I to r) Chairman Emanuel Celler (D-N. Y.), Herbert N. Maletz, 
counsel, and Samuel R. Pierce Jr., associate counsel. 



CELLER COMMITTEE PROBES 
NBC-WESTINGHOUSE SWAP 

• FCC's without-hearing approval of transaction questioned 

• House antitrust group schedules more hearings for July 

• Justice Dept. puts deal before Philadelphia grand jury (see box) 



THE controversial NBC-Westinghouse Broad- 
casting Co. swap of radio-tv stations in Cleve- 
land and Philadelphia — and the FCC's explana- 
tion of why the transaction was approved with- 
out a hearing — overshadowed all other sub- 
jects last week during two days of hearings by 
the House Antitrust Subcommittee in its hunt 
for monopoly in the television industry. 

At the end of the Wednesday-Thursday ses- 
sions, subcommittee Chairman Emanuel Celler 
(D-N. Y.) asked the FCC to return for three 
more days of hearings, July 11-13, and in a 
surprise announcement said the House group 
will hold lengthy hearings in New York in 
September. At these sessions, he said, his group 
will hear testimony from networks, advertising 
agencies, uhf representatives, talent and others 
on antitrust problems in the tv broadcasting 
field. 

Although FCC members underwent some 
questioning on allocations problems and on the 
ABC-Paramount Theatres merger in 1953, the 
subcommittee directed its main fire at NBC's 
swap of the former WNBK (TV) and WTAM- 



AM-FM Cleveland for WBC's former WPTZ 
(TV) and KYW Philadelphia. 

The House subcommittee based its whole 
case on three memorandums prepared within 
the FCC's Broadcast Bureau during the Bureau's 
five-month investigation of the facts surround- 
ing NBC's swap of its radio-tv properties in 
Cleveland for WBC's radio-tv stations in Phila- 
delphia, with WBC receiving $3 millon "to 
boot." 

High points of these documents: 

• That investigators found WBC executives 
bitter at what they felt was NBC "pressure," and 
that they felt that they might not only lose NBC 
affiliation at WPTZ (TV), but also at KDKA- 
TV Pittsburgh and WBZ-TV Boston, if WBC 
failed to go through with the transfer. 

• That Chris J. Witting, then WBC president, 
in the heat of anger fired off a memorandum to 
WBC Board Chairman E. V. Huggins suggest- 
ing these alternatives for WBC: (1) possible 
affiliation with CBS at Pittsburgh, San Francisco 
and Boston and with ABC at Philadelphia; (2) 



THEY'RE ASKING QUESTIONS IN PHILLY 



THE Dept. of Justice last week put the 
NBC-Westinghouse station exchange before 
a federal grand jury in Philadelphia. 

In accord with the customary secrecy that 
surrounds federal grand jury sessions, no 
official word leaked out of Philadelphia. It 
was understood, however, that four key 
Westinghouse executives who were personal- 
ly connected with the negotiations leading 
to the NBC-WBC swap testified Thursday. 

They were reported to be Chris Witting, 
who was president of Westinghouse Broad- 
casting Co. at the time of the station ex- 
change but who has since been elevated to 
vice president in charge of the Consumer 
Products Div. of Westinghouse Electric Co.; 
E. V. Huggins, chairman of WBC; John W. 
Steen, WBC attorney, and Joseph E. Bau- 
dino, WBC vice president in charge of the 



Washington office. 

Complete details of conversations, meet- 
ings and exchanges of correspondence re- 
garding the station swap were reported to 
have been sought in questions asked by Dept. 
of Justice attorneys during the jury session. 

Also under subpoena to appear before the 
Philadelphia grand jury the second week of 
July are RCA-NBC executives who were in- 
volved in negotiating the Cleveland-Philadel- 
phia deal. They reportedly are Brig. Gen. 
David Sarnoff, RCA chairman; Robert W. 
Sarnoff, NBC president; Joseph V. Heffer- 
nan, NBC financial vice president, and 
Charles R. Denny, NBC vice president in 
charge of owned stations. 

All NBC and Westinghouse records per- 
taining to the deal also were understood to 
have been subpoenaed. 



Page 60 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 61 



GOVERNMENT 



"work up a proposal for CBS;" (3) seriously 
consider severing all relations with NBC; and 
(4) determine the status of the "A-l agree- 
ment" — under which NBC programmed WBC 
stations from 1932-40 after Westinghouse di- 
vested itself of its holdings as main stockholder 
in RCA. 

• That Mr. Witting saw RCA Board Chair- 
man Brig. Gen. David Sarnoff and asked him 
if "this muscling job" was RCA company policy, 
and that the general answered that it wasn't 
a "muscling job," that he was acting to protect 
RCA stockholders by getting more financial 
support for NBC and that RCA felt it had to 
have WPTZ for this purpose. 

o That WBC officials said they were told in 
negotiations that NBC was considering the pur- 
chase of WFIL-TV Philadelphia if WBC failed 



to go through with the transaction. Investiga- 
tors said WFIL-TV owner Walter H. Annenberg 
denied he ever talked to RCA-NBC officials on 
this subject, but did tell an "unidentified" per- 
son he would swap WFIL-TV for 400,000-500,- 
000 shares of RCA stock, making him that com- 
pany's largest stockholder. 

• That the Broadcast Bureau felt, after Mc- 
Farland letters had been sent to WBC and NBC 
and replies received which indicated no "du- 
ress," that no hearing was warranted on this 
point, but that NBC's stations and planned 
acquisitions in the mid-Atlantic area posed 
questions of area concentration of owned sta- 
tions, with some overlap. 

• That WBC Board Chairman E. V. Hug- 
gins, in talking to Broadcast Bureau investiga- 
tors, left the inference that WBC had decided 



to go through with the swap to protect its NBC 
affiliations in Boston and Pittsburgh. 
High points during last week's hearing: 

• Testimony by FCC Chairman George C. 
McConnaughey that FCC approved the trans- 
fer, after digesting the Broadcast Bureau report, 
because: (1) WBC and NBC replies to FCC 
McFarland letters indicated no pressure by 
NBC and the Broadcast Bureau felt officials of 
these companies would not be "candid" at any 
hearing called by the FCC; (2) although the 
Broadcast Bureau memorandums questioned 
whether the total NBC acquisitions might not 
pose a question of "area concentration," Mr. 
McConnaughey said he got the "impression" 
from talking to Bureau personnel at an FCC 
meeting that "nothing new would be developed" 
at a hearing on this subject. 

• Congressional questions directed at FCC's 
liaison with the lustice Dept.'s Antitrust Divi- 
sion. Congressmen wanted to know why the 
FCC, which began its investigation in July 
1955, didn't inform the Justice Dept. until 
August. They also wanted to know why the 
FCC held to its Dec. 21, 1955, approval (pub- 
lished Dec. 28) after Justice had delivered a 
letter to the FCC Dec. 27 informing the Com- 
mission it was investigating the case. 

• When Mr. McConnaughey and other com- 
missioners said they did not learn of the letter 
until later, the subcommittee asked why FCC 
did not rescind or withhold action on the ap- 
proval during the 30-day limit within which it 
is empowered to do so. Mr. McConnaughey 
said Justice had not indicated it had any more 
information than the FCC did on the case. 

• FCC Comr. John C. Doerfer testified he 
thought there was nothing illegal then about 
the transfer and still didn't. He said he felt 
the broadcast industry shouldn't be "harassed" 
by "three or four" government agencies. Asked 
whether, as a member of the FCC's network 
study committee, he would be "disturbed" if 
it were found that the "dominance" charged 
to networks in the FCC's 1941 report on chain 
broadcasting also apply to television, Comr. 
Doerfer said, "not at all." "Somebody has to 
be dominant," he said. "Dominance is just the 
natural result of the ebb and flow of business 
relations from day to day." 

Chairman Celler told Mr. McConnaughey 
he didn't think WBC "had much of a chance" 
and was "in a sort of box." The fact that the 
Broadcast Bureau memorandums flashed a 
"danger signal" gave emphasis to the need for 
an inquiry, he said. Several other members 
agreed with him, although Rep. Hugh Scott 
(R-Pa.) said he saw no wrongdoing on the 
part of WBC, NBC or the FCC. Others present 
included Reps. William M. McCulloch (R- 
Ohio), Peter W. Rodino Jr. (D-N. J.), Kenneth 
B. Keating (R-N. Y.), Byron G. Rogers CD- 
Colo.) and James M. Quigley (D-Pa.). 

The Wednesday session began with an open- 
ing statement by Chairman Celler on the pur- 
poses of the investigation. At the end of the 
Thursday testimony, he told newsmen that the 
subcommittee would hold the hearings in New 
York in September. The group, he said, would 
investigate financial setups of the networks and 
their owned stations, network practices and 
uhf-vhf problems. 

Also to be investigated, he said, are the 
"star systems" (for talent), "bottling up" of 
talent by such things as long contracts, the 
"tyranny of ratings," "chewing up" of talent 
by the heavy demands of television, the "short 
life" of comedians and other talent, racial seg- 
regation of talent on network programs, news- 
paper and magazine control of broadcasting 
media in specific geographic areas, the "power" 
of advertising agencies, pre-emption of net- 
work time and the "film monopoly." He said 

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Page 62 • July 2, 1956 



the NBC-WBC swap will be explored further, 
but that WBC will not be called to testify unless 
it asks. 

Much of the testimony dealt with the re- 
spective jurisdictions of the FCC and the Jus- 
tice Dept. in enforcing the antitrust laws and 
whether an FCC decision can "immunize" a 
case from action by the Justice Dept. 

It was developed in the hearing that NBC 
Vice President Charles V. Denny (owned sta- 
tions and spot sales) first suggested the Cleve- 
land-Philadelphia swap to NBC management in 
February 1954 and that NBC's original pro- 
posal also included the trade of NBC's WRC- 
TV Washington and WBC's WBZ-TV Boston, 
which WBC quickly vetoed, according to the 
Broadcast Bureau reports. 

Actual negotiations did not begin until Sep- 
tember 1954, with an estimated 23 meetings of 
the two firms' officials from Sept. 28, 1954, to 
May 16, 1955, when the transaction was closed. 
WBC tried to get a "tax-free deal," but failed, 
the reports said. 

No Commitments from NBC 

WBC during negotiations tried to get com- 
mittals from NBC to protect its NBC affilia- 
tions, especially Boston, but got only one letter 
from Gen. Sarnoff to the effect that NBC, with 
its proposed acquisitions in Philadelphia, New 
Britain and Buffalo, would have its plans for 
station ownership complete in the eastern area, 
the investigators' report said. The Broadcast 
Bureau probe was conducted by Lester W. 
Spillane, then chief of the FCC's Renewal & 
Transfer Division, and Robert Leahy, FCC ac- 
countant-investigator. 

The Bureau report also warned that if the 
FCC made the grant without a hearing and no 
protest was filed, it would be "difficult if not 
impossible to redress any undesired condition" 
resulting from the transfer. 

The reports indicated Joseph E. Baudino, 
WBC Washington vice president, felt that al- 
though no discussion took place concerning 
NBC affiliations with WBC stations, WBC ex- 
ecutives felt there was a "veiled threat" of such 
a condition. Mr. Huggins told investigators, ac- 
cording to the report, that WBC applied for 
NBC affiliation for KDKA-TV Nov. 5, 1954, 
but that NBC withheld it until it received a 
Nov. 15 letter from WBC indicating Westing- 
house would go along "in good faith" with the 
transaction. 

Questioned on WBC's reply to the FCC's 
McFarland letter, Mr. McConnaughey said he 
couldn't conceive of a firm the size of Westing- 
house "not telling the truth." 

Mr. McConnaughey said the WBC answer 
indicated the firm felt withdrawal of the NBC 
affiliation from WPTZ would reduce the in- 
come of the station considerably; that Cleve- 
land was the type of community in which WBC 
was interested; that it was more in the public 
interest and to WBC interests to make the ex- 
change than to operate without an NBC affilia- 
tion; that Westinghouse Electric and RCA have 
been competitive in the manufacturing fields 
and that both companies make decisions they 
believe is best for their respective interests; and 
that WBC and NBC "in our own interests" de- 
cided to try to work out an agreement. 

Chairman Celler commented that the WBC 
statement "speaks volumes." He said the sub- 
committee had been told the proposed purchase 
of WFIL-TV by NBC was a "hoax" used to 
obtain bargaining power and said he felt the 
WBC letter should have prompted the FCC to 
ask "many, many questions." 

Comr. Rosel H. Hyde answered questions 
about the ABC-Paramount Theatres merger, on 
which the FCC held 93 days of hearings in 



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five cents, Mrs. Baker thought it 
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So Junior held a meeting with his 
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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 63 



GOVERNMENT 



FCC STARS IN NEW KIND OF TV ROLE 



THE FCC starred in a 90-minute, Charlotte, 
N. C, $3,000 video show last Monday 
when the full hour and a half of oral argu- 
ment on ch. 9 Charlotte before the Commis- 
sion en banc was filmed and recorded and 
shown over ch. 3 WBTV (TV) Charlotte 
that night in prime time to its 525,000 set 
owners. 

At issue was the second vhf facility in 
North Carolina's major city. Contending 
were Piedmont Electronics & Fixture Corp., 
Carolinas Television Corp., and WSOC 
Charlotte. Piedmont, which was recom- 
mended for the grant by the hearing exam- 
iner, is owned by the Mitchell-Wolfson 
(WTVJ [TV] Miami, Fla.) and Belk de- 
partment store interests. Carolinas' is largely 
controlled by WIS-AM-TV Columbia, S. C. 
(whch also owns WIST Charlotte). 

WBTV used two professional Auricon 
cameras, each capable of handling 1,200 ft. 
of film and sound (about 30 minutes). The 
crew of four was under the supervision of 
Nelson Benton, WBTV news editor. The 
cameras were set up in the corner of the 
Commission meeting room on the sixth floor 
of the Post Office Dept. Bldg., and were 
operated without any additional lighting. As 
each reel was completed, the second camera 



was turned on and the first was unloaded. 
The exposed film was rushed to a Washington 
processor. The crew with its processed film 
and equipment left for Charlotte at 6 p.m. 
in the Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Co.'s 
private company plane, arriving at 8 p.m. 
The films were telecast, unedited, beginning 
at 10 p.m. The station gave up a half hour 
of local live programming, a half hour of de- 
layed network programming, 30 minutes 
of news-weather-sports, and a national spot 
show. This time was estimated to have a 
value of $3,023. 

The sound portion of the telecast was 
simulcast by WBT Charlotte, sister station 
of WBTV, and also by WIST Charlotte, 
owned by principals in the Carolinas' applica- 
tion. 

The argument heard attorney Neville 
Miller argue in behalf of WSOC, William P. 
Sims for Carolinas and Marcus Cohn for 
Piedmont. Question of overlap between WIS- 
TV and prospective ch. 9 in Charlotte was 
raised against the Carolina application. 
Charge that WTVJ flouted good commercial 
practices in overabundance of commercials 
was also raised. Richard T. Ely Jr. repre- 
sented the Broadcast Bureau. 

All Commissioners were present except 
Comr. Webster. 




PORTION of the FCC is shown here listening to oral argument on ch. 9 Charlotte, 
N. C, filmed by WBTV (TV) Charlotte and telecast that night. Shown are (I to r) 
Comrs. Robert E. Lee, Robert T. Bartley, Rosel H. Hyde and Chairman George C. 
McConnaughey. Standing at podium, with back to camera, is Neville Miller, repre- 
senting WSOC Charlotte, one of the three applicants for the vhf outlet. 



1952 and approved in February 1953, with the 
merger formalized in May 1953. 

Mr. Hyde said the Justice Dept. had been 
kept fully informed of progress of the hearings 
by the FCC and that Justice observers attended 
all phases of the hearings. Although the de- 
partment was invited to participate in the hear- 
ings, it never did so during the proceeding. 
Chairman Celler, referring to Justice Dept. 
refusal to participate, termed it as a case 
"where the shoe was on the other foot." 

Although admitting that Paramount Theatre 
stockholders wound up with 60% of AB-PT 
stock and ABC stockholders with only 16%, 
Mr. Hyde said he did not think of the case as 
one where ABC was "taken over by a chain of 
movie theaters," but of one where a third net- 
work was set up. He said it was a financial 
strengthening of ABC instead of a lessening of 
competition. 

He felt the FCC "did a good job" in ap- 
proving the merger after the hearing, but when 
asked whether he thought the Justice Dept. did 
a similarly good job, he smiled and said that was 
for the department itself to say. 

Mr.McConnauehey, answering questions on 
the FCC's allocations report last week, said 
he believed the FCC would have to get "con- 
gressional assistance" to implement the pro- 
posed long-range transfer of tv from vhf to 
uhf. For instance, he said, Congress might 
prohibit the shipment of vhf-only sets in inter- 
state commerce. 

He felt "nobody wants to see the networks 
destroyed" and that's why Congress "finally" 
gave the FCC funds for its network study. He 
praised U. of Cincinnati Dean Roscoe Barrow, 
head of the study, as a man with no previous 
experience in broadcasting, but with "stature." 

Bill Seeking FCC Salary Raise 
To Go Into Hearing Thursday 

A HEARING will be held Thursday by the 
Senate Post Office & Civil Service Committee 
on a Senate bill (S 2628) and a House measure 
(HR 7619) to raise the salaries of members of 
the FCC and other executive agencies and 
heads of executive departments. FCC members 
now get $15,000 a year. 

Committee Chairman Olin D. Johnston (D- 
S. C.) said he believed there are "many inequi- 
ties" in the legislation as now presented. The 
House-passed HR 7619 was passed in the first 
session of the 84th Congress, but the Senate 
has taken no action on it. The bill would 
raise FCC members' salaries from the present 
$15,000 to $19,000. 

The Senate measure (S 2628), introduced in 
the first session by Sen. Johnston and Sen. 
Frank Carlson (R-Kan.), the committee's rank- 
ing Republican, calls for FCC salaries of 
$20,000. This figure was recommended by 
the White House. 

Blacklisting Report Author 
Faces Hill Committee July 10 

JOHN COGLEY, author of the controversial 
Fund for the Republic report on blacklisting in 
the entertainment industry [B®T, June 251, has 
been subpoened to appear July 10 before a 
closed session of the House Un-American Ac- 
tivities Committee. The announcement was 
made by Rep. Francis E. Walter (D-Pa.), chair- 
man of the House group, which only two weeks 
ago postponed an investigation of the fund 
which was scheduled to begin last Wednesday. 

Rep. Walter said the report on blacklisting 
"levels very grave charges against organiza- 
tions and persons in the entertainment indus- 
try whose efforts have been directed toward 
eleminating the menace of the communist 



conspiracy in the United States." He also 
added that the committee is not now in a posi- 
tion to pass judgment on the conclusions 
reached in the report. 

The Fund for the Republic was established 
with a $15 million Ford Foundation grant. 
It has been under heavy criticism as "soft" 
on communism. Mr. Cogley, former editor 
of the Catholic periodical Commonweal, crit- 
icised the alleged blacklisting of "controversial" 
performers and directors by entertainment em- 
ployers. 

Extended DST for D. C. 

A BILL which would extend Daylight Saving 
Time in the District of Columbia an extra 
month this fall — to the last Sunday in Octo- 
ber — cleared Congress last week and was sent 
to the President for signature. The bill brings 
Washington time into line with that of most 
large eastern cities, including New York, and 
will help radio-tv stations in the Washington 
area in aligning their schedules to conform with 
network programming. 



Protests Bring Postponements 
Of KTSA, KVAR (TV) Actions 

THE FCC last week postponed the effective 
dates of its May 2 grant for transfer of control 
of KTSA-AM-FM San Antonio and its April 
25 grant to KVAR (TV) Mesa, Ariz., for a 
change in facilities. This action followed pro- 
tests and petitions for reconsideration filed by 
KITE San Antonio against the KTSA grant, 
and by KTVK (TV) Phoenix against the KVAR 
grant. 

KTSA was sold by O. R. Mitchell Motors to 
McLendon Investment Corp. for $306,000. The 
McLendon Corp. — Barton R. and Gordon B. 
McLendon— owns KLIF Dallas, KELP El 
Paso, WRIT Milwaukee, WGLS Decatur, Ga., 
and KOKE (TV) El Paso. Mr. McLendon must 
return control of KTSA to the assignor, the 
FCC said. Hearings were set for Sept. 10, with 
KITE bearing burden of proof. KVAR (TV) 
sought to change its main studio location to 
Phoenix and maintain an auxiliary studio in 
Mesa. KTVK will be party to the proceeding 
when hearings begin. 



Page 64 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



Tampa, Evansville, Rochester 
Purchases Submitted to FCC 

TOPPING the monetary list of station sales 
filed with the FCC last week was the $3.5 mil- 
lion sale of WTVT (TV) Tampa, Fla., to WKY 
Radiophone Co. (WKY-AM-TV Oklahoma 
City The Daily Oklahoman and Oklahoma City 
Times) [At Deadline, June 25]. 

Also filed was the over-$500,000 purchase 
of ch. 62 WFIE (TV) Evansville, Ind., by 
WAVE Inc. (WAVE-AM-TV Louisville, Ky.) 
[B»T, June 26], and the previously announced 
sale of WHAM-WHFM Rochester, N. Y., by 
Transcontinent Tv Corp. to Riggs & Green Inc. 
[B*T, June 18]. Price paid for the Rochester 
outlets was $500,000, the same amount Trans- 
continent paid to Stromberg-Carlson Div. of 
General Dynamic Corp. in the $5.1 million 
deal which also included WHAM-TV [B«T, 
April 9]. All the sales are subject to FCC ap- 
proval. 

Tampa Tv (WTVT) balance sheet as of May 
31, 1956, showed a deficit of over $70,000 as 
of Sept. 30, 1955, and a net loss of more than 
$160,000 for the eight months ended May 31. 
WKY Radiophone showed' total assets of more 
than $3.5 million with net income after state 
and federal taxes of $384,000 in 1954 and 
$260,000 in 1955. 

Premier Tv Inc. (WFIE) listed $588,497 
total assets as of May 31, 1956. Purchasing 
group, WAVE Inc., listed more than $3 mil- 
lion assets March 31, 1956. 

Copies Asks Court to Review 
Lottery Tag on 'Play Marko # 

PETITION for a review of the FCC's order of 
May 23 [B«T, May 28] which declared the 
bingo-type program Play Marko a lottery was 
filed last week in the U. S. Court of Appeals in 
Washington by the Caples Co., Chicago adver- 
tising agency which distributes the program. 

The Commission's May order was in re- 
sponse to a request for declaratory judgment 
sought by Caples in May 1955. At that time 
Caples was reported to have been airing the 
program on some 25 stations. Then the Com- 
misson, in a letter to KTLA (TV) Los Angeles, 
one of the stations carrying the show, declared 
its belief that the program was a lottery. This 
action, Caples said, caused all but one station 
to terminate their contracts. 

A suit by Caples in the U. S. District Court 
in Washington seeking a hearing on the con- 
troversy was dismissed on grounds the FCC had 
issued no legal, official action against Marko. 

In last week's petition, Caples claimed that it 
was adversely affected by the Commission's 
declaratory order; that Play Marko is not a 
lottery since it lacks the essential element of 
consideration, and that the FCC's declaratory 
ruling is an uncodified rule and wrongfully de- 
prives Caples of a valuable property right, con- 
trary to the April 5, 1954 Supreme Court radio 
lottery decision. 

FCC Clarifies Angle 
To Equal Time Provision 

IT'S ALL RIGHT for a station to give sustain- 
ing time to one candidate even though a second 
candidate refused an offer of similar facilities, 
the FCC has ruled — providing stations with 
one more signpost on the eve of the 1956 
political campaign. 

Request for the ruling was made by WSAZ 
Huntington. W. Va., through its Washington 
law firm. Cohn & Marks. The station said it 
desired to make a sustaining period available 
for use by political candidates for a local office 



for which there are two principal contenders. 
One of the candidates accepted the offer, WSAZ 
said, but the other said he did not desire the 
time. 

The Commission said that under the facts 
stated there would be no violation of Sec. 315 
of the Communications Act if the station went 
ahead and made the sustaining period available 
to the candidate who had accepted. However, 
it added, if the candidate who refused subse- 
quently requested time, the question of whether 
he was entitled to equal time would have to be 
determined in the light of all the facts and 
circumstances then present. 

Sec. 315 of the Communications Act re- 
quires that if a station permits its facilities to 
be used by one candidate, it must offer equal 
facilities to all other candidates for the same 
office. 



Webster's Farewell 

A farewell reception in honor of Comr. 
Edward M. Webster, who retired yester- 
day after 47 years of government service, 
was held Thursday by the FCC. The 
retiring FCC commissioner was given 
an illuminated scroll, presented by FCC 
Chairman George C. McConnaughey, 
and a high fidelity radio-phonograph set. 
He was also presented with a "DSC" — 
"deintermixture service cross" — by the 
staff. The reception, attended by several 
hundred FCC officials and staff, was held 
in the reception room of the Post Office 
Building. 



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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 65 



ADDED REGULATION OF TV SEEN UNLIKELY 



BOXSCORE 

STATUS of tv cases before FCC: 

AWAITING FINAL DECISION: 10 

Corpus Christi, Tex., ch. 10; Miami, Fla., 
ch. 10; Seattle, Wash., ch. 7; Jacksonville, 
Fla., ch. 12; Hartford, Conn., ch. 3; Pa- 
ducah, Ky., ch 6; Indianapolis, Ind., ch. 13; 
New Orleans, La., ch. 4; St. Louis, Mo., ch. 
11; Charlotte, N. C, ch. 9. 

AWAITING ORAL ARGUMENT: 7 

Boston, Mass., ch. 5; Orlando, Fla., ch. 9; 
McKeesport, Pa., (Pittsburgh), ch. 4; Buf- 
falo, N. Y., ch. 7; Biloxi, Miss., ch. 13; San 
Francisco-Oakland, Calif., ch. 2; Lead- 
Deadwood, S. D., ch. 5 

AWAITING INITIAL DECISION: 3 

Hatfield, Ind., (Owensboro, Ky.), ch. 9; 
Pittsburgh, Pa., ch. 11; Toledo, Ohio, ch. 11. 

IN HEARING: 5 

Beaumont-Port Arthur, Tex., ch. 4; Che- 
boygan, Mich., ch. 4; Mayaguez, P. R., ch. 
3; Onondaga-Parma, Mich., ch. 10; Coos 
Bay, Ore., ch. 16. 



Kenneth Cox, special counsel 
to Senate Commerce Commit- 
tee, tells ATAS luncheon in 
New York that there is a good 
chance Congress — and proba- 
bly the Justice Dept. — will 
continue to keep close watch 
to guard against 'abuses/ 

THERE'S no general feeling in Washington 
that additional regulation of television is "nec- 
essary or desirable" at this time, but there's a 
good chance that Congress — and probably also 
the Justice Dept. — will continue to keep a close 
watch to make sure that no "abuses" develop. 

This was the nub of conclusions drawn last 
week from a speech by Kenneth Cox, special 
counsel to the Senate Commerce Committee in 
its long-drawn but now virtually completed 
hearings on allocations, pay-tv, and network 
practices. 

He said that in his opinion the only way to 
resolve the pay tv controversy may be in giv- 
ing toll tv a "try," but on an experimental basis 
if at all and with appropriate safeguards to pre- 
vent harm to the present free system of broad- 
casting. He maintained that nothing would be 
allowed to kill off free television, as opponents 
have claimed that pay tv would do. If pay tv is 
authorized, he indicated, provisions would be 
made "to stop it" if it should threaten the exist- 
ence of free tv. 

Although he felt the committee may take 
some preliminary steps to relieve the "acute" 
situation in tv allocations — this was before FCC 
released its own proposals last week — he ad- 
vised his listeners not to look for "any startling 
changes in the overall look" of television "for 
a long time to come." 

Magnuson Detained 

Mr. Cox spoke at a Tuesday luncheon meet- 
ing of the Academy of Television Arts & 
Sciences in New York. He substituted at the 
last minute for Sen. Warren Magnuson CD- 
Wash. ). chairman of the Commerce Committee, 
who was kept in Washington by the impending 
Senate vote on Air Force funds. 

With regard to the committee's inquiry into 
network practices specifically, he said "everyone 
agrees" that networks are "essential," that they 
perform an important function and have per- 
formed it well. The problem would be con- 
siderably lessened if there were enough stations 
in major markets, he noted, but added that at 
least "until that time comes" it must be ex- 
pected that Congress, and perhaps also the 
Justice Dept., will continue to keep an eye on 
network practices to see that abuses do not de- 
velop. 

He suggested, answering a question, that 
"anti-trust" action against the networks might 
come if some person or company felt sufficiently 
aggrieved to file a triple damage suit under 
anti-trust laws. 

He observed at one point that the FCC, 
in its desire to avoid any appearance of censor- 
ship has not always looked closely enough — in 
renewal proceedings — at stations' performance 
records as compared with their promises. 

He also expressed his view that stations' right 
to editorialize would be essential as television 
"comes of age," but also pointed out that edi- 
torializing poses a number of problems includ- 
ing that of assuring opportunity for the pres- 
entation of opposing viewpoints and that of 
making sure that editorials are not misconstrued 
as newscasts. 

Sen. Magnuson, he observed at another point, 



feels that newscasters should not read com- 
mercials. He also cited a British practice of 
never showing the newscaster on camera. 

The tv allocation problem — that of getting 
three, and later four and five stations in all 
important markets — is an "acute" one for which 
a number of solutions have been advanced, he 
observed. Uhf is vital, he said, but also "is in 
bad shape." And if uhf is to continue and be 
successful, he asserted, present hard-pushed uhf 
broadcasters will have to be "salvaged" — their 
operations made profitable — or there will be 
no incentive for other broadcasters to get into 
the field. 

Mr. Cox summarized some of the solutions 
that have been proposed, reporting that wit- 
nesses appearing before the Senate committee 
appear agreed that deintermixture is the "essen- 
tial first step" that should be taken now. Among 
others: proposals that all television be moved 
into uhf, which he said have "certain appeal" 
but many problems; vhf drop-ins, which he 
said might be used in some areas; and excise 
tax relief to boost the manufacture of all- 
channel sets, which he termed a "desirable" 
move that should also be extended to color sets 
so that when color begins "flooding the market" 
there will be assurance that sets will receive all 
channels. 

Mr. Cox said in Washington Thursday that 
the Senate Commerce Committee's proposed 
interim report on tv allocations — directed to 
the FCC and said to be a document setting out 
broad principles for the FCC to follow in its 
reallocations proceeding — is being redrafted in 
the light of the FCC's issuance last week of its 
"Report & Order on Television Allocations" 
(see story, page 27). 

The revised report will be substantially dif- 
ferent from the one the committee staff had 
planned to present for approval at a meeting 
of the Senate committee last Wednesday, he 
said. The redrafted document probably will 
be presented for committee approval next week, 
he added. Mr. Cox said senators at the com- 
mittee meeting were in general agreement that 
the interim report should be issued, despite the 
FCC action last week, but in view of this action, 
senators want to take a "more careful look" at 
its contents. 

Windup of the committee's hearings are in 
sight, although no date has been set for the 
next sessions, Mr. Cox said. The committee 
plans to have the FCC as the last group of 
witnesses, with the Commission to be ques- 
tioned, among other things, on its allocations 
action last week. He felt two more days of 
hearings could conclude the committee's ses- 
sions, with the FCC appearing last on the stand. 
There are no present plans to hear film syndica- 
tion interests, Mr. Cox said, adding that "up 
to now they have been avoiding us like the 
plague". 

Storer Amends Salem Bid 

STORER Broadcasting Co. last week filed 
amendment to application seeking FCC ap- 
proval of its $27,277 purchase of KSLM-TV 
Salem, Ore., requesting deletion of its request to 
move the ch. 3 Salem vhf to Portland to replace 
ch. 27 KPTV (TV) there. Storer instead asked 
the Commission to grant a modification of the 
KSLM-TV permit to move the station's trans- 
mitter location to a point 12 miles south of 
Portland. This amendment follows an applica- 
tion two weeks ago for Salem ch. 3 by Salem 
Tv Co. (C. H. Fisher), accompanied by a pe- 
tition asking the FCC to vacate the ch. 3 grant 
to KSLM-TV [At Deadline, June 25]. 



WWBZ Asks FCC to Grant 
One-Year Probation Period 

REQUEST for license renewal on a "proba- 
tionary" one-year basis was filed with the FCC 
last week by WWBZ Vineland, N. J., whose 
license was revoked by the Commission last 
November [B«T, Dec. 5, 1955] because of over- 
emphasis of horse racing programs. In ordering 
the station to cease operation within 60 days, 
the FCC found that WWBZ's horse-race broad- 
casts were helpful to, and being used by, illegal 
gambling interests. Since the decision, the sta- 
tion has been granted two 60-day grace periods, 
the latest only a fortnight ago [B«T, June 25, 
Jan. 30]. 

The unique request for probationary status 
suggested alternative actions by the FCC, either 
of which would be acceptable, the station said — 
renewal for one year on a probationary basis 
or suspension for one year of FCC action which 
denies the station's request for license renewal. 

Deadwood Grant Proposed 

INITIAL DECISION recommending that tv ch. 
5 at Deadwood, S. D., be awarded to the lone 
applicant, The Heart of the Black Hills Stations, 
was issued last week by FCC Hearing Examiner 
Herbert Sharfman. Heart of the Black Hills 
(KDSJ Deadwood, KRSD Rapid City) became 
the only applicant following the withdrawal of 
Black Hills Broadcasting Co. (KOTA-AM-TV 
Rapid City). Mr. Sharfman found that as 
Heart of the Black Hills was a qualified, un- 
opposed applicant, "nothing stands in the way 
of a grant . . ." 

Radio Shares in UAW Lobby 

A TOTAL of $5,320 was spent on radio spot an- 
nouncements in a campaign by the United Au- 
tomobile Workers designed to "influence votes" 
against the natural gas bill, Walter P. Reuther, 
UAW president, told a Senate Lobbying In- 
vestigating Committee last week in Washington. 
All told, his union spent $38,762 in newspapers 
and radio to defeat the bill, Mr. Reuther in- 
formed the senators. He compared the union 
figure with the $1,750,000 spent on behalf of 
the bill by the oil-company backed Natural 
Gas & Oil Resources Committee. The contro- 
versial gas bill was vetoed by President Eisen- 
hower because of what he called "arrogant" 
lobbying. 



Page 66 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



STATIONS 



10 PHI LA. STATIONS SERVED INDICTMENTS 



Federal grand jury charges 
outlets, nine officials, city's 
broadcasters association with 
illegally fixing time rates. 

A FEDERAL grand jury in Philadelphia last 
week indicted the Philadelphia Radio & Televi- 
sion Broadcasters Assn., 10 Philadelphia radio 
stations and nine of their officers on charges of 
illegally fixing rates for radio broadcast time. 

The indictment charged that since 1952 the 
defendants have been parties to an agreement 
to maintain published advertising rates on radio 
time in Philadelphia in violation of the Sher- 
man Antitrust Act. The indictments were re- 
turned to U. S. District Judge Francis L. Van 
Dusen. 

The charges came at the same time the Phila- 
delphia grand jury was investigating allegations 
of conspiracy in the NBC-Westinghouse Broad- 
casting Co. exchange of stations (see story, page 
60). Statements of denial against last week's 
indictments have been issued by a spokesman 
for the 10 stations and WBC President Donald 
H. McGannon. Named in the indictment were: 

WHAT and William A. Banks, its presi- 
dent; WPEN and William B. Caskey, its vice 
president; WIP and Benedict Gimbel Jr., its 
president; WFLN (FM) and Raymond S. 
Green, its general manager; WDAS and Robert 
A. Klein, its secretary; WBIG and John 
Mahoney, its general manager; WJMJ and 
Patrick J. Stanton, its president; WCAU and 
Donald W. Thornburgh, its president; Westing- 
house Broadcasting Co. and Robert Teter, sales 
manager for former Philadelphia Westinghouse 
station KYW; and WFIL. 

Action in May 

Charges against the stations developed late 
in May, when the outlets were served with sub- 
poenas by U. S. marshals [B*T, May 28]. The 
subpoenas, requested by the antitrust division 
of the Dept. of Justice, asked for documents 
and correspondence from 1952 concerning rate 
fixing, rate maintenance, charges in rates at a 
fixed time, agency recognition standards, stand- 
ard contract form for political broadcasting, 
standard advertising contracts, fixing of salaries 
for employes and talent, standard policies re- 
garding department store or chain store adver- 
tising, use of uniform standards for broadcasts, 
filing of information on rates and contracts with 
a central office. The stations were ordered to 
furnish this information to the Philadelphia 
grand jury this month. 

Commenting on the indictments, a spokes- 
man for the 10 stations said: 

"The radio stations of Philadelphia are 
shocked that the government has decided to 
proceed against them under the antitrust laws. 
Everyone is aware of the keen competition that 
exists among these stations. The stations do not 
believe that their effort to keep the competition 
among them on a dignified basis of encouraging 
the fair treatment of their clients violates any 
law. The government's action will be contested 
vigorously with confidence that the stations will 
be vindicated." 

WBC President McGannon said: 

"Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. has always 
established and published its rates independently 
and has always adhered to its published rates 
so as to avoid any discrimination or unfairness 
of its treatment of different customers. Its 
policy of adhering to its published rates has 
long been known and recognized throughout the 
advertising industry. Similarly, WBC policies 
as to relations with other broadcasting stations 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



have been carefully considered, firmly estab- 
lished, and widely known throughout the organ- 
ization. Nothing that may have been done in 
Philadelphia in any way affected the operation 
of the WBC station and it was not involved in 
any offenses charged by the grand jury." 

Stockholders Try to Block 
Cisler-to-Segal KEAR Sale 

A ROADBLOCK may be thrust in the path of 
Steve Cisler's sale of KEAR San Francisco to 
broadcaster David Segal for $500,000 [At 
Deadline, June 25]. San Francisco attorney 
Milton Stern Jr. last week announced that legal 



action will be taken in behalf of KEAR pre- 
ferred stockholders to establish their right to 
constitute a majority of the board of directors- 
Prospect also was held of protesting the transfer 
application before the FCC in an effort to re- 
tain the station's classical music format. 

KEAR has resumed its "good music" opera- 
tion. The Treasury Dept.'s auction of the 
physical property was forestalled by the Segal 
purchase. 

Mr. Stern said Mr. Cisler owned all common 
stock and appointed all board members but 
preferred stockholders had the right to name a 
majority of the board when dividends were in 
default for 24 months. Time to exercise this 
right became effective May 1, Mr. Stern said, 
and a meeting was called for June 20 but Mr. 




with that 

KENTUCKY FLAIR! 



LOUISVILLE S 



WAVE-TV 



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Affiliated with NBC 

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Exclusive National Representatives 




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PROGRAMMING: Two 1956 Surveys* show that WAVE-TV gets 
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serves 2,437,000 people in 70 mid-Kentucky and Southern 
Indiana counties. 

EXPERIENCE: WAVE-TV was first on the air in Kentucky, in 1948. 
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July 2, 1956 • Page 67 




MR. DANNENBAUM 



Cisler sold the property the morning of the 
meeting despite Mr. Stern's efforts to present 
him with a court restraining order. 

Mr. Stern told B«T the preferred stockholders 
invested $60,000 in KEAR while good music 
fans in San Francisco contributed $42,000 in 
the past 2V2 years as a result of broadcast ap- 
peals for contributions to keep the station on 
the air. 

Mr. Cisler was unavailable for comment 
Thursday. 

Dannenbaum Elected 
WBC Vice President 

APPOINTMENT of Alexander W. (Bink) 
Dannenbaum Jr., national sales manager of 
Westinghouse Broadcasting Co., New York, as 
WBC's vice president in charge of sales, is 

being announced (to- 
day) by Donald H. 
McGannon, presi- 
dent. Mr. Dannen- 
baum was named 
national sales man- 
ager earlier this year 
[B«T, March 5]. 

A veteran of 20 
years in broadcast- 
ing, Mr. Dannen- 
baum joined WBC 
in 1953 at the time 
the company had 
purchased WPTZ 
(TV) Philadelphia. 
He began in radio as a salesman for WDAS 
Philadelphia in 1935, remained with the station 
(except for four years in the Army during 
World War II) until 1946, resigning his post of 
station manager at that time to join WPEN 
Philadelphia as commercial manager. 

When NBC-TV and Westinghouse effected 
a sale and switch of their respective Cleveland 
and Philadelphia stations this past winter [B»T, 
Feb. 13], Mr. Dannenbaum stayed on with the 
Philadelphia stations (renamed WRCV-AM-TV 
by NBC), as commercial manager, and rejoined 
WBC as national sales manager two months 
later to replace Eldon Campbell, who had 
resigned. 

In his new position, Mr. Dannenbaum will 
take charge of the overall sales and sales poli- 
cies of WBC stations in Boston, Cleveland, Ft. 
Wayne, Pittsburgh, Portland, Ore., and San 
Francisco. He will continue to headquarter in 
New York. 

KSD-AM-TV to Get New Home 
In 'Post-Dispatch 7 Expansion 

ACQUISITION by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch 
(KSD-AM-TV) of an 18-acre tract in that city 
as a future home for its combined radio-tv 
and newspaper operations was announced by the 
newspaper last week. Also announced was the 
purchase of another tract, 42 acres, which will 
serve as site for KSD-TV's new transmitter and 
1,088-ft. (above average terrain) tower. 

The proposed tower, billed as one of Mis- 
souri's tallest man-made structures, will be 
1,649 ft. above mean sea level, 1,114 ft. above 
ground and will replace the station's present 
540-ft. tower. The new facility will add 7,000 
sq. miles to KSD-TV's present 10,000 sq.-mile 
coverage area, the station said. 

Plans call for either a two- or three-story 
building on the new property, which is located 
in the west-central part of St. Louis. The Dis- 
patch properties now are housed in an eight- 
story, downtown building, which was built in 
1917 and cannot be expanded. 




ARTHUR G. RYDSTROM (I), newly ap- 
pointed vice president-director of Tv Den- 
ver Inc. (KBTV [TV]), is "welcomed 
aboard" by John C. Mullins, president of 
the corporation who announced the ap- 
pointment last week. Mr. Rydstrom is 
senior vice president of Webb & Knapp, 
New York real estate firm headed by 
William Zeckendorf. Webb & Knapp and 
Mr. Mullins each own 50% of Tv Denver 
Inc., which was organized to acquire sev- 
eral radio and tv properties [B*T, Dec. 5, 
1955]. 



New WISN-AM-TV Center 
To Be Begun This Month 

CONSTRUCTION of a $1,250,000 radio-tele- 
vision center for WISN-AM-TV Milwaukee 
will begin this month, it was announced last 
week by John B. Soell, manager of the sta- 
tions. 

WISN currently is celebrating its 34th year 
of broadcast service. The anniversary observ- 
ance is including transcribed salutes from civic 
leaders, congratulatory messages from enter- 
tainment celebrities and other special program 
features. 

The radio station began broadcasting in 1922 
with the call letters WSOE. WISN now is 
affiliated with ABC, with most of its programs 
originating locally. 

Harry Burke Resigns Post 
As KFAB Omaha Manager 

HARRY BURKE, general manager of KFAB 
Omaha since 1945, has resigned that post and 
will announce future plans after returning 
from an extended 
vacation. 

Prior to his as- 
sociation with 
KFAB, Mr. Burke 
was with WOW 
Omaha for 13 years, 
serving as program 
director and later as 
assistant general 
manager in charge 
of sales. 

Mr. Burke has 
served on the Ad- 
visory Board of 
CBS and is a past 

president of Nebraska Broadcasters Assn. 





MR. WHITMIRE 



MR. BURKE 



Lawyer Charged in Attack 
On KSEK Manager Sandstrom 

A. S. GRAHAM, Pittsburg, Kan., lawyer, has 
been charged with assault and battery upon 
Thad Sandstrom, manager of KSEK in that 
community. 

The lawyer was charged with striking Mr. 
Sandstrom at the radio station following a 
news broadcast concerning rejected petitions 
for recall of the city manager form of govern- 
ment in Pittsburg. Mr. Graham is a leader in 
the effort to get a special election on such a 
recall. His trial has been set for July 17 in 
Pittsburg City Court. 

Beverly T. Whitmire, 53 # 
WFBC-AM-TV Manager, Dies 

BEVERLY T. WHITMIRE, 53, manager of 
WFBC-AM-TV Greenville, S. C, and part 
owner of three radio stations, died Thursday at 
Ramey Air Force Base, Puerto Rico, two days 

after suffering a cor- 
onary thrombosis. 

I He was stricken on 
the first leg of a 
Navy-sponsored in- 
doctrination trip. 

Mrs. Whitmire 
and their daughter, 
Beverly, flew to the 
base when he suf- 
fered his heart at- 
tack. He was to 
have gone to Pan- 
ama to board the 
Franklin D. Roose- 
velt, aircraft carrier. 
The three stations in which he held an in- 
terest were WAYS Charlotte, N. C; WCOG 
Greensboro, N. C, and WAKN Aiken, S. C. 

Mr. Whitmire was widely known in the 
broadcasting industry. A raconteur, he was 
asked at the April NARTB convention in 
Chicago to tell some of his famous stories 
while the Tv Board election results were being 
tabulated. 

After schooling at Sewanee Military Acad- 
emy, Georgia Tech and Columbia U. School 
of Journalism he went to work on the Greenville 
Piedmont, published by ex-Sen. Roger C. Peace, 
becoming assistant city editor. When the Pied- 
mont started- WFBC in 1933, he persuaded Sen. 
Peace to name him station manager. 

In Greenville, Mr. Whitmire was a leading 
figure in a little theatre movement, Kiwanis 
Club and many local charities. Many of the 
nation's leading figures in politics and enter- 
tainment have enjoyed rides on his boat, "Lolli- 
pop," cruising around the Saluda River where 
Mr. Whitmire had a cottage. He taught a high 
school boys class at an Episcopal Sunday 
School. 

The body was to be flown back to Greenville 
Saturday, with funeral services yesterday (Sun- 
day). 

KDB Sold for $125,000 

SALE of KDB Santa Barbara, Calif., by F. 
Robert Bauer to a group headed by James 
Harford for $125,000, was announced last week. 
Sale of the 250 w, 1490 kc, MBS-affiliated 
outlet is subject to FCC approval. Mr. Har- 
ford is part owner of KONE Reno and KTTO 
Las Vegas, both Nevada. The sale was nego- 
tiated by Arthur Hogan, president of Albert 
Zugsmith Corp., Hollywood. Mr. Harford said 
there would be no changes in personnel. 



Page 68 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



Intercontinental Elects 
Albert Zugsmith President 

ALBERT ZUGSMITH has been elected presi- 
dent of Intercontinental Broadcasting Corp., 
which is seeking FCC approval for purchase of 
KVSM San Mateo, Calif. [B«T, May 28]. Mr. 
Zugsmith is a Universal Pictures producer, 
chairman of the board of the Albert Zugsmith 
Corp. (newspaper-broadcast brokers) and chair- 
man of the board of KRKD Los Angeles and 
KITO San Bernardino, Calif. 

Other Intercontinental principals include Vice 
Pres. Arthur B. Hogan, who is seeking FCC 
approval for purchase of KFOX Long Beach, 
Calif.; Sec.-Treas. Frank Oxarart, executive 
vice president of Albert Zugsmith Corp.; Mel- 
ville Tucker, Universal executive, and John 
Feldman, owner of KDON Salinas-Monterey, 
Calif. 

Petry to Open New Offices 

EDWARD PETRY & CO., station representa- 
tive, will open its new offices in New York 
next Monday at 3 E. 54th St. 

In announcing the move, Edward Petry, pres- 
ident of the firm, noted that both his clients 
and agencies contributed to the Petry concern's 
growth. He declared the shift was "significant" 
to the whole broadcast industry "because it 
shows dramatically the increased service sta- 
tion representatives are providing their stations 
and the advertising profession." New quarters 
for the company, formerly at 488 Madison 
Ave., will have more sales and executive offices, 
including space for the firm's new sales devel- 
opment and special services department. 

Hudelson on WBC Project 

BEN A. HUDELSON, production supervisor, 
WBZ-TV Boston, will take a leave of absence 
to work on a special assignment in New York 
at the headquarters of the parent Westinghouse 
Broadcasting Co. 

In New York, Mr. Hudelson will work with 
WBC Education Director Ordon Hawkins and 
William J. Kaland, the group's national pro- 
gram manager, on development of several new 
radio-tv educational and public service pro- 
grams. 




KANS Wichita, Kan., has appointed Sim- 
mons Associates as its national sales 
representative, it was announced last 
week. At the contract signing are (I to r): 
Gale Blocki Jr., Simmons vice president; 
Kenyon Brown, president of KANS; Dave 
Simmons, president of Simmons, and Frank 
J. Lynch, the station's general manager. 

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July 2, 1956 • Page 69 



Civil Defense Volunteers 
Goal of WCBS Program Series 

AN ATTEMPT to "humanize" Civil Defense 
and to attract volunteers was launched last 
week by the New York State Civil Defense 
Commission in conjunction with WCBS New 
York and Kastor, Farrell, Chesley & Clifford 
Inc., New York, radio-tv consultants to the 
commission. 

Over 30 New York State radio stations have 
contracted to run a new series of programs 
titled Civil Defense Means You! They take 
listeners to local CD demonstrations, allow 
them to meet active volunteers, "some of whom 
might be neighbors," according to the com- 
mission. The programs are produced and nar- 
rated by Martin Weldon, producer of WCBS's 
This Is New York and other local public af- 
fairs programs. 

Petry Promotes Steese 

WILLIAM H. STEESE, member of Edward 
Petry & Co. sales promotion staff, has been 
named promotion- 
research-sales de- 
velopment manager 
in the station repre- 
sentation firm's radio 
department. In addi- 
tion, Jack Keiner, 
also on Petry's sales 
promotion staff and 
former radio-tv di- 
rector of Allen & 
Reynolds Adv., 
Omaha, has been 
promoted to adver- 
tising and sales pres- 
entations director 
for the Petry firm. 




MR. STEESE 



REPRESENTATIVE SHORTS 

Forjoe & Co. and Forjoe-Tv Inc. have moved 
to new quarters at 451 N. LaCienega Blvd., 
L. A. 47. New phone: Oleander 5-7755. 

Burke-Stuart Co., station representative, moved 
N. Y. offices to larger quarters at 60 E. 56th 
St., effective today (Monday). Telephone: Plaza 
1-2156. 

REPRESENTATIVE PEOPLE 

Buxton Johnson, assistant to president, Dun- 
nan & Jeffrey Inc., N. Y. advertising agency, 
to Blair-Tv, N. Y., as member of sales staff. 

Dick Kelliher, formerly with WWJ-TV and 
WJBK Detroit, to San Francisco office of Mc- 
Gavren-Quinn Co. effective July 15. 

STATION SHORTS 

WFRV-TV Green Bay, Wis., moving studios 
from present Scrays Hill site to new quarters 
at Mason & Rossevelt Sts., Green Bay. 

KYW Cleveland, Ohio, went on 24-hour broad- 
cast schedule June 25. 

KPOJ Portland, Ore., operating new mobile 
unit built by Pacific Body Builders, Portland. 

STATION PEOPLE 

Thomas B. Sawyer, commercial manager, WIST 
Charlotte, N. C, named general manager of 
WAYS Charlotte, succeeding James P. Poston, 
resigned to join ABC in New York. 

Robert E. Morey, program director, KDKD 
Clinton, Mo., appointed station manager. 



Jack Shiver named resident manager of WCRE 
Cheraw, S. C, by Roy Zess, new owner and 
partner-manager of WGMA Moultrie, Ga. 

Harvey Lucas, account executive, WCUE 
Akron, Ohio, appointed assistant station man- 
ager. 

Martin Barksy named national sales manager, 
WGLV(TV) Easton, Pa. Bill Latham to WGLV 
local sales manager. 

Gene A. Milsteen, film buyer, KFEQ-TV St. 
Joseph, Mo., named program director. 

Dale Allison to KPDQ Portland, Ore., as pro- 
gram director. 

Fred Mueller, formerly of KMOX and KWK- 
TV St. Louis, to KSD-AM-TV as promotion 
manager, succeeding David Pasternak, ap- 
pointed assistant circulation manager of St. 
Louis Post-Dispatch. 

Albert Downing, Crosley Broadcasting Co., 
Cincinnati, to KYW-AM-FM-TV Cleveland as 
merchandising manager. 

John Francis Dunn, Procter & Gamble Co., 
N. Y., to the newly-created post of merchan- 
dising manager of WABC New York. 

Don Dickerson, advertising manager for Dal- 
las, Tex., Div. of Safeway Stores Inc., to 
WFAA-TV Dallas on local sales staff. 

Harrison Wooley, San Francisco radio execu- 
tive, to KCBS there as sales account executive, 
succeeding Robert Price, promoted to CBS 
Radio Network sales. 

Jack Van Nostrand, national sales representa- 
tive for KNXT(TV) Hollywood and CBS-Tele- 



Campaign in Campaign 

WTVJ (TV) Miami believes it has found 
the answer to the ticklish, often irritating 
business of political advertising on tele- 
vision. It's recent "campaign within a 
campaign" has turned viewer complaints 
of yesteryear into words of commenda- 
tion. 

Long before spring primaries exploded 
in Florida, the station had mapped out 
its plan. Its premise was simple: protect 
the viewer by limiting and selecting time 
for each candidate and protect the can- 
didate by putting him in the right time 
slot with the best production possible. 

The first step was to secure a list 
of state and local qualified candidates. 
WTVJ General Sales Manager John S. 
Allen then sent each a form letter de- 
scribing the maximum time he and the 
other candidates in his particular race 
were allowed and the procedure for 
buying time. 

"This assured voters that the 'rich' 
candidate would not monopolize televi- 
sion time," said Mr. Allen. "And since 
voters are viewers, it assured them that 
they would not miss their favorite pro- 
grams week after week." 

Every effort was made to steer away 
from the time-weary picture of the can- 
didate who sat motionless while his 
mouth moved. Candidates were asked 
to bring visual aids — platform charts, 
maps diagramming proposed highway 
plans and pictures. Professional lighting 
techniques were brought into play, and 
numerous background props were used. 
Film shows were aired by some more 
enterprising candidates. 




WGTH-TV Hartford, Conn., carried all 
four days of the Insurance City Open golf 
tournament last Wednesday-Saturday at 
Hartford's Wethersfield Country Club. 
The $20,000 tournament was co-sponsored 
by the Connecticut Bank & Trust and Con- 
necticut Medical Service. Checking the 
contract (I to r) are William B. Dixey, ac- 
count executive, Wilson, Haight, Welch & 
Grower advertising agency; Charles Stew- 
art, WGTH-TV account executive; Graham 
R. Treadway, Bank & Trust vice president; 
Jack Downey, WGTH-TV general man- 
ager, and Adrian Conway, director of 
public relations, Medical Service. 



vision Pacific Network, promoted to account 
executive, succeeding Ray Beindorf, joining 
CBS-TV Spot Sales, Chicago. Bruce Huffman, 
sales service coordinator for station and net- 
work, succeeds Mr. Van Nostrand as national 
sales representative. Van Rubenstein, chief 
assistant, commercial traffic department, to 
sales service coordinator. 

Charles Harrison, news director, WFIL Phil- 
adelphia, to WCKT(TV) Miami, Fla., as di- 
rector of news and special features. 

Myron Wagner, formerly in radio-tv in Mid- 
west, to KSFO San Francisco as account ex- 
ecutive. 

William J. Moyland, recent graduate of Wis- 
consin State College, Milwaukee, to sales staff 
of WTMJ Milwaukee. 

Cy Kassel, newscaster, appointed news direc- 
tor, WHIL Medford, Mass. 

Jack Vaughn, formerly production director of 
KWIE Kennewick, Wash., named radio pro- 
ducer for WBZ Boston, where he will super- 
vise station's music library. 

Dick Richmond, news director, WRIT Milwau- 
kee, Noe-Mac station, transferred in same 
capacity to KTSA San Antonio, Tex., also Noe- 
Mac outlet. 

Dick Covington, WHBQ Memphis, Tenn., and 
Don Norman, WMC Memphis, to WHHM 
there. 

Nancy Wallace, continuity assistant, WTIC 
Hartford, Conn., appointed continuity editor. 

Fred Bennett, early morning m.c, WPEN Phil- 
adelphia, resigned to join Voice of America. 

Larry Cott, formerly news editor, KFRC San 
Francisco, to newswriting staff, KGO-AM-FM- 
TV San Francisco. 

Bob Scott, WGEM-TV Quincy, 111., to talent 
staff of WOOD Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Jack D. Hunter, WICA Ashtabula, Ohio, to 
WTAY Robinson, 111., replacing Wayne W. 
Cody Jr., resigned to take position in Salt Lake 
City. 



Page 70 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



James E. Shipp, former salesman, WDBJ Roa- 
noke, Va., returned to WDBJ-TV there as an- 
nouncer. Dudley Townsend, WDBJ announcer, 
assigned show on WDBJ-TV. Ron McDonald, 
WDEV Waterbury, Vt., to WDBJ-TV as news- 
man. Sherman Cable, WBLT Bedford, Va., 
to WDBJ-TV as audio engineer. Pat Darden, 
Kyle Compton, James Dalmas and Al Dyson 
also to engineering staff. Toby Garrett, Roa- 
noke College student, and David Conner, Roa- 
noke Times-World advertising department, to 
WDBJ-TV as floormen. Irene Richardson to 
station receptionist and Rita Riley named sec- 
retary to production manager. 

William C. White, assistant brand manager, 
Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, to WMUR-TV 
Manchester, N. H., as executive assistant. Mary 
Lou Guiney, station staff, promoted to traffic 
chief. 

Len Corbosiero, associate director, KNX Holly- 
wood and Columbia Pacific Radio Network, 
named director. 

Renetta Jacobson named continuity chief, 
KVOO-TV Tulsa, Okla., replacing Barbara 
West, resigned to join Seidenbach's as advertis- 
ing director. 

Don Sherman, WAFB Baton Rouge, La., to 
WBOS Boston as disc jockey. 

Charles Masella, on staff of Hotel Kenmore, 
Boston, to WBZ Boston as assistant traffic 
manager. 

Jake Rufli, formerly announcer at WPBN Tra- 
verse City, Mich., to WKZO-TV Kalamazoo in 
similar capacity. 

Spook Beckman, personality, WTVN-TV Co- 
lumbus, Ohio, emceeing daily radio show on 
WTVN. 

Dick Stohrer, account executive at WKZO 
Kalamazoo, Mich., elected president of East- 
wood Community Assn., Mich. 

DeLois Faulkner, fashion coordinator, WK.Y- 
TV Oklahoma City, married June 23 to Max 



Boydston, former U. of Okla. Ail-American 
football player. 

Malcolm Klein, assistant general sales manager, 
KABC-TV Hollywood, father of boy, Daniel 
Louis, June 20. 

Ralph Renick, news director, WTVJ (TV) 
Miami, Fla., father of girl, Susan Marie, June 
19. 

Gene Webster, producer-writer, KNX Holly- 
wood, father of girl, Jill Meredith, June 19. 

Mrs. Carleton D. Smith, wife of NBC vice 
president and general manager of WRC-AM- 
FM-TV Washington, died June 25 after short 
illness. 

Jeanne Kenna, known professionally as Jeanne 
MacKenna, performer on WGN-TV Chicago's 
Lunchtime Little Theater, died in Augustana 




PIPER AIRCRAFT Corp., Lock Haven, Pa., 
using northeastern Pennsylvania as a test 
market, is sponsoring Let's Fly with Piper, 
a weekly program on WILK-TV Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. The program gives flight in- 
structions with actual film shots of student 
pilots. Completing arrangements are (I 
to r): Thomas P. Shelburne, WILK-TV man- 
aging director; William D. Strohmeier, 
Davis, Parsons & Strohmeier advertising 
agency, New York, and Harold Swank, 
owner-operator of Scranton Airways and 
Piper distributor. 



Rising Power 



TV was the yeast that upped the sales of 
Spruance Bread Mix from 20 cases a 
month to 750, according to WHEN-TV 
Syracuse. All it took, the station reported, 
was one 60-second spot a week on 
WHEN-TVs Kay's Kitchen, a half hour 
cooking show. The 3,000% sales in- 
crease, said the station, is due completely 
to that one spot a week. 



Hospital, Chicago, June 23. She formerly 
worked for NBC and CBS in Chicago. 

W. J. Williamson, sales manager, WBZ-WBZA 
Boston-Springfield, Mass., named to board of 
directors, Advertising Club of Boston. 




c 



jln the progress towards automation, the 
Gates "Sta-Level" offers broadcasters a 



highly efficient average level amplifier that 
relieves the operator of most gain riding. 
Rated at 1% or less distortion at 30 Db. 
compression at +20 Db. output threshold 
level. - "Sta-Level" is 100% self-contained 
including regulated power supply and drop 
down to service front panel. Rack size only 
5'A" x 19". - All Gates products include 
tubes in the selling price. "Sta-Level" com- 
g *plete only $225.00. 



GATES RADIO COMPANY 

MANUFACTURING ENGINEERS SINCE 1922 

QUINCY, ILLINOIS, U.S.A. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 71 



-PLAYBACK- 

QUOTES WORTH REPEATING 



REACTIONS ON BLACKLISTING 

Lawrence Laurent, writing in the Wash- 
ington Post & Times Herald on the Fund 
for the Republic's report on "blacklisting" 
[B»T, June 25]: 

NO ONE KNOWS how many patriotic 
and innocent persons have been damaged 
in the blacklisting process. The answer 
is not to be found in the "Report on 
Blacklisting" and the answer won't be 
given by the television industry. There is 
no way to tabulate silence. . . . 

And since there are no concrete an- 
swers to the specific questions, the whole 
practice raises much larger issues. The 
first issue, of course, is the integrity of 
the communications industry. It is diffi- 
cult to admire an industry which runs 
from "controversy" and refuses even to 
risk the possibility of "bad publicity." A 
mature industry has to stand on its own 
right to determine the fitness of its own 
personnel. The television industry ran 
from this responsibility. The responsibil- 
ity was assumed by self-appointed list 
makers, professional patriots and, from 
all reports, a few racketeers. . . . 

If the "Report on Blacklisting" has any 
durable validity, it is this: The television 
industry must accept the responsibility 
for its own operation and, surely, a new 
set of standards is to be found. 

The Washington Daily News, Com- 
menting editorially on the blacklisting re- 
port: 

UNDER the guise of a factual report on 
what it chooses to call "blacklisting" in 
the radio-television industry, the Ford 
Foundation-financed Fund for the Re- 
public has come up with a curious treatise 
which apparently sees anti-communism a 
greater menace than communism. . . . 

Like its president, Robert M. Hutchins, 
the one time "boy" head of the U. of Chi- 
cago, the Fund for the Republic does not 
distinguish between political activity and 
the communist conspiracy. . . . 

Nowhere in the report is there anything 



about how many unfairly have been 
denied tv or radio jobs. Most of the al- 
leged "victims" are unnamed, and so are 
the sources of the information on which 
the report is based. Considering Mr. 
Hutchins' avowed distaste for faceless in- 
formers, that's an ironic commentary. . . . 

The report smacks more of boon- 
doggling than usefulness. 

ABOUT PUBLIC INTEREST 

Harry M. Brawley, director of public 
affairs, WCHS-TV Charleston, W. Va., 
addressing the Ohio State Institute for 
Education by Radio-Tv: 

MOST DEFINITIONS of "operating in 
the public interest" include a statement 
about "improving" the public in some 
way or other. Usually we say that any 
program which informs, educates or in- 
spires is one which will improve the 
listener. We would like to add another 
verb to that list. We would like to say 
that any program which "relaxes" the 
listener or viewer is also in the nature of 
an improvement and is therefore in the 
public interest. 

Everyone knows the value of relaxa- 
tion when one gets home from the office 
or the job. A farmer wants his market 
reports and his informational programs 
from the Dept. of Agriculture, but he 
also wants his fun. After a day with 
the crops he will be in no mood for a 
program on how to outmaneuver army 
worms. He would much rather watch 
Jack Benny, and who is to say he won't 
be a better farmer tomorrow if he can 
relax and enjoy himself tonight? 

We must have our forums, our inter- 
views, our classrooms of the air, and our 
religious programs — but let's brag a lit- 
tle about the other things, too! Let's stop 
saying that broadcasting must operate in 
the public interest. Rather let us realize 
that, properly done, broadcasting — all of 
it — IS the public interest! 



PERSONNEL RELATIONS 

READ GETS STAY 
OF AFM EXPULSION 

Court grants temporary re- 
straining order to union's 
Hollywood rebel leader. Local 
47 elects five pro-Read sup- 
porters to board. 

EXPECTATION that AFM President James 
C. Petrillo soon will use his new powers of 
trusteeship to take over insurgent Local 47 in 
Hollywood appeared last week as Local 47 rebel 
leader Cecil F. Read obtained a temporary 
court order staying his membership expulsion 
and anti-Petrillo forces scored victories in the 
fight to control Local 47 at an all-night member- 
ship meeting Monday. 

Court tests of Mr. Petrillo's powers are in 
prospect. Also significant in the rebellion 
against Mr. Petrillo's policies and the AFM 
Music Performance Trust Funds (which are 
bolstered by radio, tv and recording royalties) 
was the open stand taken by tv star and band- 
leader Ozzie Nelson in support of Mr. Read. 

Mr. Nelson challenged pro-Petrillo leader 
John te Groen, Local 47 president, to explain 
his defense of Mr. Petrillo and the manner in 
which AFM treated Mr. Read and 11 other 
Local 47 rebels when they appeared before the 
AFM Atlantic City convention June 12 to 
appeal their expulsion by a trial board. The 
convention sustained the penalties [B»T, June 
18]. 

Los Angeles Superior Court Judge John J. 
Ford granted Mr. Read a temporary restrain- 
ing order last week returning him to member- 
ship pending a formal court appeal. Mr. Read 
said he intends to be a party, among others, "to 
one or more law suits which will be filed shortly 
to determine the validity of the trust fund and 
which will challenge the right of the Federa- 
tion to make or modify collective bargaining 
agreements without the approval or consent of 
the musicians covered by these agreements." 

Mr. Read also said, "I intend to ask for 
further congressional investigation of the AFM, 
the undemocratic provisions of its constitution, 
the arbitrary powers granted to the president 
(Petrillo) and the executive board, the trust 
fund policies and collective bargaining agree- 
ments which are under the domination of the 
International Executive Board and Mr. Petrillo." 

By three-to-one margins the Local 47 mem- 
bership meeting elected five Read-supporters to 
fill vacancies on the board; provided for election 
of the local's trial board by the membership 
instead of appointment by the president and 
board, and voted that the local's ten business 
agents be appointed by the board instead of just 
by the president. 

It was expected that at least one of the local's 
business agents, Vincent Augustine, would be 
replaced soon since he has been charged with 
"bugging" by secret tape recorder the Feb. 27 
caucus meeting at which rebel leaders planned 
their strategy to win membership support for 
ouster of pro-Petrillo president te Groen. Mr. 
Petrillo played portions of the tape to the 
Atlantic City convention, Mr. Read said, and 
the tane reportedly played a role in the trial and 
expulsion of the Read group from AFM. 

SAG Details Reasons 
For Anti-Merger Stand 

SCREEN ACTORS GUILD last week sent its 
national membership a special report detailing 
reasons why the SAG board of directors has 
unanimously rejected a proposal by leaders of 




Page 72 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



the American Federation of Television & Ra- 
dio Artists that the two organizations merge 
[B«T, June 4]. 

The report by SAG President Walter Pidgeon 
condemns an AFTRA move "to invade" the 
guild's long-established motion picture jurisdic- 
tion. It lists six major reasons and other sup- 
plementary reasons why the guild refused to 
merge with AFTRA. It also pledges that the 
guild will work for a stronger federation of 
actors' unions (the Associated Actors and 
Artistes of America) and a "simplified member- 
ship card plan for the entire entertainment 
industry." 

Among reasons given for turning down the 
idea of merger with AFTRA, the guild report 
said that "AFTRA spokesmen and publications 
have made clear that AFTRA policy is to 
promote live television at the expense of tele- 
vision motion pictures" and that had the guild 
"succumbed to AFTRA's arguments and pres- 
sures years ago, in all probability there would 
be little employment for actors in television 
motion pictures today." It added that 
"AFTRA's attitude toward television motion 
pictures is inequitable" and "would adversely 
affect thousands throughout the United States 
who are presently employed as performers in 
television motion pictures and filmed tele- 
vision commercials, under Screen Actors 
Guild contracts." 

"Because the Screen Actors Guild won its 
fight (against AFTRA) six years ago, the per- 
formers today are part of a thriving and grow- 
ing television motion picture industry," the 
report said. 

The SAG report also declares that "merger 
would not lower union dues and probably 
would raise them . . .", and refers to "the 
political fights and schisms between various 
wings in the union, which periodically plague 
AFTRA, and from which the Screen Actors 
Guild has remained singularly free." 

— PROFESSIONAL SERVICES — 
Porter, Winsor Nuptials 

PAUL PORTER and the former Kathleen 
Winsor are honeymooning in Spain following 
their wedding last Tuesday in New Haven, 
Conn. Mr. Porter, former chairman of the 
FCC and OPA administrator, is a partner in 
the Washington law firm of Arnold, Fortas & 
Porter. Miss Winsor is the author of "Forever 
Amber." They will make their home in Wash- 
ington. 

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE PEOPLE 

John A. De Chant, vice president, Crusade for 
Freedom, Washington, opening public rela- 
tions firm in Washington Oct. 1 with Crusade 
as first client. 

Victor J. Nexon, president of Microwave Serv- 
ices Inc., N. Y., elected to board of directors, 
-William J. Scripps Assoc. Inc., Detroit tele- 
communications consultant firm. 

George T. Land, former operations manager, 
WLBT (TV) Jackson, Miss., to Phil Dean 
Assoc., radio-tv station public relations firm, 
N. Y., as southern and southwestern regional 
manager. 

Robert W. Bloch, account executive for Dine 
& Kalmus, N. Y., public relations firm, for 
more than two years, resigned, effective July 1, 
to open public relations organization at 20 E. 
53d St., New York 22. 

William R. Day, who resigned as publicity di- 
rector, KLZ-AM-TV Denver [B«T, June 11], 
has opened Denver public relations firm, Ethell 
& Day, with Edward O. Ethell, public relations 
consultant. 




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See page 101 



NETWORKS 



AFFILIATES FAVORABLE TO MUTUAL PACT 



Network officials wind up two 
weeks of regional meetings to 
discuss new contract with af- 
filiates and declare results are 
'by and large' pleasing. 

MUTUAL NETWORK officials last week 
wound up a two-week round of regional meet- 
ings to discuss their new affiliation contract 
with affiliates and described themselves as well 
pleased with the overall results. 

They conceded that some stations probably 
will be lost when the new contract goes into 
effect on Nov. 1, but said that "by and large" 
the reaction of affiliates was "good" and that 
there undoubtedly would have been some defec- 
tions no matter how small a change had been 
proposed. 

The Mutual officials could give no exact ac- 
counting of acceptances because some of the 
new contracts have not as yet been sent to sta- 
tions. This task may take another week or ten 
days, they indicated. 

Station Relations Vice President Robert Car- 
penter said he was pleased with the overall 
reaction and reiterated his view, expressed 
when the plan was first unveiled officially to 
affiliates during the NARTB convention [B«T, 
April 23], that "if this were the first contract 
ever offered by a network, every station would 
be beating down our doors to get it." 

The new contract — which network officials 
say will go into effect Nov. 1 "regardless" and 
will be the only affiliation contract that Mu- 
tual has — asks stations to "pre-clear" and carry 
without compensation 16 hours of network 
time a week, but cuts the amount of network 
option time back from the present 63 a week 
to 35, and provides free programming for 
stations to sell locally. 

'Share the Wealth' Plan 

Another feature of the new MBS system 
of operation, although this is not written into 
the new affiliation contract, is a "share the 
wealth" plan whereby stations that clear for 
network programs will share in MBS profits 
(after operating costs are paid) in proportion 
to their respective network rates [B«T, June 
18]. Officials said this plan also will go into 
effect Nov. 1. 

Other new features include the so-called 
"block music" programs to be made available 
to stations without charge (9 p.m. to midnight 
Sunday through Friday, 6-8 p.m. Saturday, 
and 11 p.m. to midnight Saturday), and the 
"automation" plan whereby affiliates are urged 
to install or adapt equipment to permit inte- 
gration of network shows with local spots or 



For Mamie and Ike 

IN a musical tribute to President and 
Mrs. Eisenhower on their 40th wedding 
anniversary yesterday (Sunday), CBS 
Radio's Music on a Sunday Afternoon 
scheduled several tunes that are favorites 
of the President and his wife. The songs 
to have been played included "Down 
Among the Sheltering Palms," "Little 
Girls, Goodbye," "Swing Low, Sweet 
Chariot," "I'm in Love With a Wonder- 
ful Guy" and "Star Dust." The program 
was to conclude with a tune that CBS 
Radio noted has pleased the President 
since the first time he heard it at the 
opening of "Call Me Madam" — "They 
Like Ike." 



breaks for evening or weekend programming 
hours [B«T, June 18]. 

Mr. Carpenter estimated that 250 affiliates 
attended the six regional meetings, held between 
June 15 and June 27 to explain the new plans 
in detail. The last two sessions were held last 
week, with one in Atlanta on Monday attended 
by some 70 affiliates and the windup in New 
York on Wednesday with 31 present. Net- 
work officials making the rounds of the meet- 
ings included Mr. Carpenter, President John 
Poor and Sales Vice President Harry Trenner. 

ABC Radio Reports Billings 
Of $500,000 for Morning 

BUSINESS representing approximately a $500,- 
000 net billing in ABC radio's morning schedule 
was to be reported today (Monday) by the 
network's national sales manager, George 
Comtois. 

Topping the sales was a 52-week contract 
signed by Admiral Corp., Chicago, for five 
segments weekly on Breakfast Club starting at 
various dates this month on behalf of the 
manufacturer's portable and standard tv sets 
and refrigerators. Agency is Henri, Hurst & 
McDonald, Chicago. 

Other new business included Thomas J. Lip- 
ton Inc. (Lipton soups), Hoboken, N. J., 
through Young & Rubicam, New York, buying 
15 segments of Breakfast Club, starting Oct. 2 
on a schedule not yet firm; Magla Products 
(silicone ironing board covers), Newark, N. J., 
taking eight segments of Breakfast Club, starting 
Sept. 13 and through Edward Lieb Agency, 
Newark; Slenderella International salons (slen- 
derizing system), Stamford, Conn., through 
management Assoc. of Connecticut, same city, 
contracting for segments on Mondays, Wednes- 
days and Fridays of When a Girl Marries for 
26 weeks starting Aug. 6. 

Renewals included Beatrice Foods Co. (Make- 
A-Shake milk shakes), Chicago, via Mason 
Warner Co., same city, for Monday and 
Wednesday segments of Breakfast Club, start- 
ing July 9; the Dromedary Co. (cakes and 
mixes), division of National Biscuit Co., New 
York, through Ted Bates & Co., New York, for 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday segments of 
When a Girl Marries, effective July 17, and 
General Foods Corp. (Calumet baking power), 
White Plains, N. Y., through Young & Rubi- 
cam, New York, for Tuesday segment weekly, 
effective tomorrow (Tuesday). 

NBC Radio Will Top Rivals 
In Weekend Business — Ayres 

NBC RADIO claimed last week that by this 
month it will be doing a bigger dollar volume 
of business on weekends than any other radio 
network. Charles T. Ayres, vice president in 



News Flashes From 

WHLS 



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Page 74 • My 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



charge of the network, said advertisers will be 
spending 48% more dollars with NBC Radio on 
weekends than with "the second" network. 

Weekends on NBC Radio consist of the con- 
tinuous Monitor service, which Mr. Ayres said 
was 50% sold out in June and is 71% sold for 
July and 78% for August. He also reported 
that during its first year on the air, which ended 
June 12, Monitor recorded more than $4 million 
in billings and boosted NBC Radio's weekend 
revenues by 278% over the preceding year. 
These figures had been estimated earlier, but 
unofficially, as $5 million in billings for the 
12-month period representing a 300% increase 
in weekend business [B«T, June 25]. 

Mr. Ayres also maintained that NBC Radio 
now carries 64% more sponsored time on week- 
nights than does "the second radio network." 

Levitt New General Manager 
Of NBC Film, Merchandising 

APPOINTMENT of Robert D. Levitt as general 
manager of NBC-TV Films and the merchan- 
dising (licensing) division, effective July 9, was 
announced last week by Alan W. Livingston, 
president of the Kagran Corp., an NBC sub- 
sidiary. Kagran supervises the activities of 
NBC-TV film sales, network licensing, film pro- 
duction and NBC's theatrical operation. 

Mr. Levitt, who has been director of national 
sales at Screen Gems, New York, since the be- 
ginning of 1956, will headquarter in Kagran's 
New York office and will report directly to Mr. 
Livingston. From 1942 to 1946, Mr. Levitt was 
a vice president and director of the Hearst Pub- 




MR. LEVITT MR. STANTON 



lishing Co. and was publisher of the American 
Weekly and Puck, the Comic Weekly. He was 
director of Hearst promotion enterprises from 
1947-51. 

As general manager of NBC-TV Films, Mr. 
Levitt will handle the duties currently adminis- 
tered by Carl M. Stanton, vice president of 
NBC-TV Films and a director of Kagran. Mr. 
Livingston announced that Mr. Stanton will 
leave the film unit and return to NBC as a vice 
president and director of Kagran. The exact 
nature of Mr. Stanton's new duties has not been 
determined, according to a network spokesman. 

Deitch Joins CBS-TV Div. 

GENE DEITCH, formerly creative supervisor 
of Robert Lawrence Productions, New York, 
has been appointed to the newly-created post of 
creative supervisor of Terrytoons, a division of 
CBS-TV Film Sales, it was announced last 
week by William M. Weiss, general manager of 
Terrytoons. 

Mr. Deitch was with CBS from 1945-46 as 
assistant art director in Hollywood. In 1946, 
he joined United Productions of America in 
Hollywood and left in 1949 to join the Jam 
Handy Organization (motion picture products) 
in Detroit. Mr. Deitch rejoined UPA in 1951 
to help organize a branch office in New York 
and served the company for more than four 
years as supervising director. 



GOVERNORS SEE NEW GEAR 
FOR CONVENTION USAGE 

NBC demonstrates electronic 
equipment to be used in report- 
ing Democratic, Republican 
nominating sessions. 

A REPRESENTATIVE group of state gover- 
nors, their aides and a number of newsmen 
were guests of NBC Tuesday at the first public 
preview of the network's new electronic gear 
that will be used to cover the national political 
conventions this summer. The briefing and 
demonstration were held at the Shelbourne 
Hotel, Atlantic City, N. J., where the annual 



governors' conference was in session. 

On hand for NBC were Davidson Taylor, 
vice president in charge of public affairs; Wil- 
liam R. McAndrew, director of news; Barry 
Wood, director of special events; Chet Huntley, 
newsman and one of the NBC-TV convention 
anchor men; Richard Harkness, and various 
other NBC News correspondents who will 
cover the conventions. 

Emphasis was placed on the portability and 
mobility of equipment, in particular the RCA 
"transceiver" — a tiny, two-way radio that is 
the size of a lady's formal handbag, and the 
"creepie-peepie," a portable tv camera. 

A display of equipment used in radio-tv 
coverage of the 1952 conventions with their 
1956 counterparts dramatized the evolution of 



the 



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experience as America's leading manufacturer 
of tape and disc recording equipment. 





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adjusting brakes. Variable fast-speed control. Wired for remote 
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playback channels, single 500-ohm transformer input, 250-ohm 
low-level mixer, illuminated VU meter, and 500-ohm output with 
+ 20 db maximum power. 

Model R-l 1 tape transport mechanism (chassis only) $ 775.00 

Model R-ll in carrying cose 827.00 

Model SR-11 recording console (include R-H mechanism, A-901 amplifier 



and CC-2 studio console) 

Model SA-5 remote control switch 



1250.00 
40.00 



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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 75 



Advertisement 



STOVIN APPOINTMENT 




Mr. W. D. (Bill) BYLES 

Horace N. Stovin, President of Horace N. 
Stovin & Company, Radio and Television 
Station Representatives, announces the 
appointment of Mr. W. D. (Bill) BYLES 
as Executive Vice President and Director. 

Mr. Byles — who leaves Young and Rubi- 
cam as supervisor of Radio and Televi- 
sion — brings with him 25 years of experi- 
ence in the business. He was formerly 
Radio Director of Spitzer and Mills, and 
prior to that with MacLaren Advertising 
and Philp-Massey, in their radio depart- 
ments. He is widely and favorably known 
in Radio and Television circles. 

Horace N. Stovin & Company has been in 
the Station Representation business 
since 1940. Since then their list of 
"proven" stations has grown both in 
number and size; and the appointment of 
Mr. Byles as Executive Vice President 
will be in '.he interest of their more 
comprehensive representation, as well 
as a more complete service to adver- 
tisers; and is in line with the growing 
economy of both Radio and Television 
as Advertising Media. 



WGR-TV 

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PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. 



NETWORKS 



electronic broadcast gear toward lightweight, 
easier-to-handle devices. Included were a 
portable camera power supply that is used in 
place of the weighty power pack; the pistol 
grip Airflex for 16 mm or 35 mm film and 
the 16 mm Auricon sound camera, compared 
to heavier film camera and associated equip- 
ment; the portable scoop lights and portable 
light carried with pack vs. bulky flood lights, 
and lapel and wireless microphones, including 
the BK-6A mike, as compared to hand micro- 
phones and the old-type headsets used four 
years ago. 

Of interest to the observers was the 7Vi-lb. 
magnetic film amplifier which makes obsolete 
the 130-lb. combination of sync recorder and 
34 mm magnetic tape recorder formerly used. 

The "creepie-peepie" (camera and pack), 
which elicited the most comment from the 
audience, was seen by Mr. Wood as the "most 
exciting" equipment yet devised for such an 
event as the conventions. The camera weighs 
10 lbs., the pack 48 lbs. A receiving antenna, 
operated separately, aids pickup. On display 
was $35,000 worth of camera gear, booms and 
cables which was needed for the 1952 conven- 
tions. Also shown was a "cue receiver" that 
resembles a hearing aid device. 

Cellomatic projector equipment was demon- 
strated. It will use new, fast film developed 
by Polaroid permitting a picture (film trans- 
parency) to be projected only two minutes 
after the photograph is snapped. The pro- 
jector also handles such optical effects as dis- 
solves, fades, cartoons, etc. 

A special film was shown of progress to date 
in setting up both the International Amphi- 
theatre at Chicago and the Cow Palace in 
San Francisco, where the respective Demo- 
cratic and Republican conventions will be 
held. Various camera and microphone posi- 
tions were explained, as well as seating arrange- 
ments. 

Mr. Taylor noted that no sooner does one 
convention year end than the networks start 
plans improving coverage of the next one, four 
years later. He said that "concentrated work 
to improve coverage" started as long as 18 
months ago. Mr. Huntley disclosed that equip- 
ment to be moved about 1,900 miles (from 
Chicago to San Francisco with about 48 hours 
to do the job) would be the equivalent to 
outfitting three tv stations. Mr. McAndrew 
spoke about the NBC News people assigned to 
various tasks at the convention, summarizing 
NBC's purposes as objectivity in the presenta- 
tion and "gavel-to-gavel" coverage. 

ABC-TV Promotes Curran 

ROBERT E. CURRAN, manager of the ABC- 
TV Cooperative Program Dept., last week was 
named assistant regional manager of ABC-TV's 
Station Relations Dept., reporting to Alfred R. 
Beckman, director, whom he also will serve as 
general administrative assistant. Mr. Curran 
joined ABC in 1950, resigned for a four-year 
duty in the U. S. Navy and returned to the 
network in 1954, serving successively as sales 
representative, tv cooperative program super- 
visor and then manager of the co-op department. 

CBS Radio Press Names Berk 

APPOINTMENT of Howard Berk, formerly 
publicity director of MCA Tv Film Syndication 
Div., as trade news editor of CBS Radio Press 
Information was announced last week by 
George Crandall, director of the department. 
Mr. Berk succeeds Harry Feeney, who recently 
transferred to the CBS-TV press information, 
department. Mr. Berk previously had served 
in public relations capacities with the New York 
Yankees baseball team and with David O. Alber 
Assoc., New York. 



More Video Recorders 
Purchased by CBS-TV 

CBS-TV has ordered a "substantial number" of 
Ampex video tape recorders in addition to the 
three prototypes scheduled for delivery in 
August, William B. Lodge, network vice presi- 
dent in charge of general engineering, said Tues- 
day afternoon during a demonstration of the re- 
coder at CBS Television City in Hollywood 
for delegates to the 53d annual convention of 
the Advertising Assn. of the West, (story, page 
29). 

Mr. Lodge declined to specify exactly how 
many units are on order because of excessive 
publicity already issued about the new technical 
development, but he assured his audience the 
number is considerable. He indicated that if 
initial "shake-down" tests of the units are suc- 
cessful, the recorder will replace film kinescopes 
in Hollywood as early as October for West 
Coast delayed playback of network shows. The 
West will be four hours behind New York time 
that month when the East continues on ex- 
tended daylight savings time. 

Mr. Lodge frankly admitted "we are not 
certain of all the capabilities or limitations of 
the recorder yet," explaining a lot of study is 
needed on practical application of the machine 
in addition to its immediate prospect as an 
economical substitute for firm kinescoping of 
delayed telecasts. He said a single tape can be 
used "fifty or a hundred times" for delayed 
telecasting whereas the practice has been to 
shoot a full hour of 35 mm film for each hour 
of delayed program, play it back once, and then 
discard the film. 

Mr. Lodge told his advertising audience that 
problems still must be ironed out on splicing 
and editing the wide tv tape too, another factor 
which indicates the recorder won't immediately 
obsolete all other tv production procedures as 
feared in some quarters. 

The recorder has no erase mechanism for the 
video section of the tape because it would have 
to be precisely synchronized with the high- 
speed whirling recording heads. The tape must 
be bulk-erased on another special device before 
being re-used on the recorder, thus the producer 
cannot immediately back up the tape and re- 
record over a flub as can be done with a sound 
recorder. 

Mr. Meighan and other network executives, 
including Mr. Lodge and Frank Samuels, 
Pacific sales manager, were hosts to the dele- 
gates on a CBS Television City tour and a cock- 
tail party. 

NETWORK PEOPLE 
William M. Koblenzer, account executive on 
ABC-TV's special project sales staff, which is 
responsible for network's Film Festivals, to 
ABC-TV general sales staff in a similar ca- 
pacity. Mr. Koblenzer is succeeded in his for- 
mer post by John R. Porterfield, WABC-TV 
New York account executive. 

Ray Beindorf, account executive, KNXT (TV) 
Hollywood, to CBS-TV Spot Sales, Chicago, in 
similar position. 

Edwin S. Reynolds, radio-tv director, Fletcher 
D. Richard Inc., N. Y., to ABC Radio as account 
executive. 




WESTERN MICHIGAN'S 

WKNK 

MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN 
W RATES 



H I L 



BEST 



Page 76 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting '• Telecasting 



Technical Employment 
Status Good-Walker 

ASSUAGING fears of heavy technical un- 
employment by virtue of remote control of 
radio station transmitters, A. Prose Walker, 
NARTB engineering manager, said last week 
that in the three years since the FCC authorized 
remote control operation of non-directional am 
and fm stations using transmitters with powers 
up to 10 kw, there has been no widespread 
loss of employment. 

"On the contrary," Mr. Walker said, "it is 
still increasingly difficult to obtain qualified 
technical personnel . . ." 

Mr. Walker, who addressed the summer 
meeting of the Pacific Division of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Electrical Engineers in San 
Francisco, also stated that 98% of all remote 
control stations are operating in conformance 
with the FCC Standards of Good Engineering 
Practice. He also reported on a 1954 survey 
which showed that 53% of the stations reply- 
ing reported no time loss through failure of 
remote control equipment. 

Meanwhile, the FCC last week postponed 
the deadline for filing comments on the pro- 
posal to permit all am and fm stations to use 
remote control — without regard to power or 
directivity of antennas — from July 2 to Aug. 
2. This was at the request of the National 
Assn. of Broadcast Employees and Technicians 
(NABET). The latest proposal on remote con- 
trol was based on a petition by NARTB, filed 
last spring. 

A signed editorial by Clifford F. Rothery, 
NABET international president, in the June 
issue of NABET News, charged that the 
NARTB petition "is in effect asking an agency 
of the federal government for an indirect sub- 
sidy." It claimed NARTB's arguments [B«T, 
Feb. 20] are "illogical." 

NABET spokesman in Chicago had no com- 
ment on what specific comments the union 
would offer in its brief. The competing Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Electrical Workers is 
collecting information on broadcast station 
operations from its own locals to be used in its 
comments [B*T, June 11, 4]. 

North Carolina Broadcasters 
Hold Nags Head Meeting 

RADIO and tv will be used on a sponsored 
basis in future campaigns, North Carolina 
Assn. of Broadcasters was informed Thursday 



TRADE ASSNS. 




"All you have to do is listen to KRIZ 
Phoenix and learn how to do it 
yourself." 




TESTIMONIAL on behalf of the industry 
was presented June 22 to C. E. Arney Jr., 
retiring NARTB secretary-treasurer, by 
NARTB President Harold E. Fellows, who 
presided at the luncheon. Mr. Arney was 
given $2,500 cash gift, radio and tv sets 
and other gifts on completion of 17 years. 

by the N. C. Heart Assn. The broadcast group 
had protested use of newspapers on a paid 
basis while radio-tv were asked to donate time. 

Meeting at Nags Head, NCAB sessions were 
presided over by Allen Wannamaker, WBIG 
Greensboro, president. Announcement was 
made that Ford Motor Co. had bought 40 
Tobacco Network and other stations for Tar 
Heel Farm Hour, thrice weekly. The program 
is produced by NCAB and the state university. 
Jack Hankins, WELS Kinston. reported for the 
agriculture committee. 

David Weaver, extension director, N. C. 
State College, said county agents had taken part 
in 12,000 radio and 800 tv programs in 1955. 

Other speakers included Richard P. Doherty, 
management consultant: Thompson Greenwood, 
secretary, N. C. Merchants Assn.; Harry Payne, 
Blackburn-Hamilton Co.; Tony Vacarro, Asso- 
ciated Press, and John B. Poor, MBS president. 
Mr. Poor spoke at the Friday luncheon. At 
a Friday breakfast he explained the new MBS 
affiliate structure. 

The resolutions committee went on record as 
approving a proposal that FCC be asked to 
make engineering licenses good for life and 
passed a resolution supporting the NARTB 
proposal that all radio stations be permitted to 
operate transmitters by remote control. Com- 
mittee members are Chairman Harold J. Essex, 
WSJS Winston-Salem. J. Robert Covington, 
WBT Charlotte, and E. Z. Jones, WBBB Burl- 
ington. 

NCAB will provide coverage of a special 
session of the Legislature starting July 23, with 
Fred Fletcher, WRAL Raleigh, in charge. Pro- 
ceedings will be fed via fm off-the-air hookup. 

A survey conducted by the NCAB sports 
committee showed that 26 replying stations 
took in $180,000 from sports programs. 

Texas UP Organizes 

ORGANIZATIONAL meeting of the United 
Press Broadcasters Assn. of Texas was sched- 
uled to be held in Austin yesterday (Sunday), 
with William C. Payette, assistant general news 
manager of UP, as guest speaker. At a pre- 
liminary meeting in Dallas several weeks ago 
. a proposed constitution was drafted and was 
to be voted on at the Austin meeting. Officers 
of the planning group are Bill Stinson, WFAA- 
TV Dallas, president; Larry Rasco, KRLD-TV 
Dallas, vice president, and LaNeil Stapp, UP 
Dallas, secretary-treasurer. 



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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 77 



TRADE ASSNS. 



H. Dennison Parker Named 
To Head Fla. Broadcasters 

H. DENNISON PARKER, WTAN Clearwater, 
was elected president of the Florida Assn. of 
Broadcasters at the June 21-23 meeting in 
Clearwater. He succeeds Harold P. Danforth, 
WDBO Orlando. Other officers elected were 
James L. Howe, WIRA Fort Pierce, first vice 
president; John H. Phipps, YTAL Tallahassee, 
second vice president, and Charles Fernandez, 
WKXY Sarasota, secretary-treasurer. 

Elected to the FAB board were Larry Rol- 
lins, WSIR Winter Haven; Mr. Danforth; M. A. 
Reynolds, WFTW Fort Walton Beach; Lee 
Ru witch, WTVJ (TV) Miami; Tom Gilchrist, 
WJHP Jacksonville; Frank Hazleton, WTNT 
Tallahassee, and Myron A. Reck, WTRR San- 
ford. 

FCC Comr. Richard A. Mack, banquet 
speaker, said the uhf problem was due mainly 
to failure of manufacturers to provide enough 
all-wave receivers. Robert L. Heald, NARTB 
chief attorney, reviewed legal problems affect- 
ing broadcasters. James W. Blackburn, Black- 
burn & Hamilton, station brokers, spoke on 
methods of appraising station properties. 

Mr. Howe was named head of a committee 
to study relations of broadcasters with educa- 
tional bodies in coverage of sports. Resolutions 
were adopted calling for a study of music li- 
censing and ratification of North American 
Regional Broadcast Agreement. John Brown- 
ing, WSPB Sarasota, was chairman of the reso- 
lutions committee. 

Rhode Island Assn. Re-Elects 
H. William Koster President 

H. WILLIAM KOSTER, WEAN and WPJB- 
FM Providence, was re-elected president of 

Rhode Island Broad- 
casters Assn. at the 
June 22 meeting 
held in Providence. 

Other officers re- 
elected were Edward 
Boghosian, WJAR- 
TV Providence, vice 
president, and Mil- 
ton Mitler, WADK 
Newport, secretary- 
treasurer. The name 
of the association 
originally was Rhode 
Island Radio & Tel- 
evision Broadcasters 
Assn. Mr. Koster is serving his third one-year 
term as association president. 

Ad Group Installs Officers 

INSTALLATION of new officers and directors 
of the Assn. of Advertising Men & Women 
Inc., New York, was held Tuesday at the Bilt- 
more Hotel. The officers are John J. Patafio, 
Reporter of Direct Mail Advertising, president; 
Stan Rubin, Elite Letter Co., New York, and 
Robert Murphy, Bureau of Advertising, ANPA, 
both vice presidents; William Graves, Grey 
Adv., New York, treasurer; Vinnie Volpe, 
Lithographers' Journal, secretary; and Marianne 
Heiden, Frederick Atkins Inc., New York, as- 
sistant secretary. Elected to the board: Herbert 
Ahrend, Ahrend Assoc., New York; Alan Ja- 
cobson, free-lance writer; John Ryder, Local 
Trademarks Inc., New York; Conrad Schafran, 
Edwin Freed Inc., New York; and Charles 
Diamond, Charles Diamond Studio, New York. 




MR. KOSTER 




BRIEFING on duties of new Florida Assn. of Broadcasters officers was given by Harold 
P. Danforth (I), WDBO Orlando, retiring president. New officers (I to r): Charles 
Fernandez, WKXY Sarasota, secretary-treasurer; H. Dennison Parker, WTAN Clearwater, 
president, and James L. Howe, WIRA Fort Pierce, first vice president. 



SDX Accepting Nominations 
For Fellows in Journalism 

SIGMA DELTA CHI last week announced 
opening of nominations for the election of 
Fellows in Journalism, setting a deadline of 
Nov. 1 for entries. Under SDX rules, not 
more than three living journalists may be 
selected. 

A committee of past SDX presidents will 
review the nominations, presenting a maximum 
of six candidates to the national convention of 
the professional journalism fraternity at Louis- 
ville, Nov. 28-Dec. 1. Alden Waite, president 
of Southern California Associated Newspapers, 
heads the committee. 

Nominations are being accepted (in writing) 
from individuals, chapters and fraternity mem- 
bers at Sigma Delta Chi headquarters, 35 E. 
Wacker Drive, Chicago 1, 111. Twenty-four 
journalists have been honored in the past by 
SDX with fellowships. 

Monroe Elected to Head 
La. -Miss. AP Broadcasters 

BILL MONROE, news editor, WDSU-AM-TV 
New Orleans, was elected president of the La.- 
Miss. Associated Press Broadcasters Assn. at 
the group's meeting in Natchez, Miss., June 
23-24. Granville Walters, general manager of 
WAML Laurel, Miss., was elected vice presi- 
dent. 

Roundtable work sessions were held, dealing 
with both wire and local news matters, and Don 
Rowland, KSIG Crowley, La., took top honors 
in a "cold reading" newscasters contest. Fifty- 
two broadcasters and their wives attended the 
sessions. 

RAB Moves Into Boston 
For 5-Day 'Sales Blitz 

ANOTHER MOVE to hypo local radio sales 
was taken last week as Radio Advertising Bu- 
reau launched the first of a series of five-day 
"sales blitzes" in the Boston area. The drive, 
scheduled to blanket 22 U. S. cities, will at- 
tempt to "talk radio" to local food manufac- 
turers, grocery chains, retail stores, industrial 
firms, utilities and banks [B»T, June 11]. 
For five consecutive days last week, RAB 



vice president and general manager John F. 
Hardesty, aided by RAB salesmen, Ted Max- 
well, Jim Baker and John Curry, called on 
Boston "prospective" advertisers on behalf of 
stations WBZ, WEEI, WHDH, WNAC and 
WVDA all RAB members. Results of the 
push will be made known to station managers 
concerned "some time this week." 

TRADE ASSOCIATION PEOPLE 

Helen Murray Hall, manager of advertising and 
promotion, NBC Western Div., Hollywood, 
elected president of L. A. Advertising Women 
Inc. Others elected: Betty Kizer, Trans World 
Airlines, first vice president; Dee Davis, Miracle 
Mile Assn., recording secretary; Dorothy Win- 
ter, BBDO, corresponding secretary; Marion 
Vilmure, Roy Rogers Enterprises, treasurer; 
Mildred Carruth, KIEV Glendale, Calif., as- 
sistant treasurer. Board members: Jane Collins, 
Hixon & Jorgensen Inc.; Fran Harris, Harris- 
Tuchman Productions; Lucile Liets, Liets Ad- 
vertising; Helen Pine, Times-Mirror Co.; Mar- 
jorie Lenz, Charm magazine; Claire Hughes, 
KWKW-AM-FM Pasadena, Calif. 

A. N. Haas Jr., Bud Radio, Cleveland, elected 
chairman and director of Assn. of Electronic 
Parts & Equipment Mfrs. Kenneth Hathaway, 
Ward Leonard Co., Chicago, elected treasurer; 
Kenneth C. Prince, executive secretary, and 
Helen Staniland Quam, Quam-Nichols, vice 
chairman. 



Brand Plugging 

BRAND NAMES FOUNDATION is dis- 
tributing two tv spot commercials on the 
value of brand advertising and brand 
buying to tv stations in major market 
areas. Time for the foundation's adver- 
tising is being contributed by the stations. 
The tv spot campaign is similar to the in- 
stitutional advertising on brand themes 
used in printed media and on radio. The 
announcements were created by Dancer- 
Fitzgerald-Sample, New York, volunteer 
agency this year for the foundation's 
consumer advertising. 



Page 78 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



Snyder Adds Duties 
In Ampex Expansion 

BECAUSE of expanded production and sales 
in video tape recorder field, Ampex Corp. has 
expanded its sales staff, with Ross H. Snyder 
named manager of video sales in addition to 
his duties as sales manager for theatre stereo- 
phonic and custom audio products, Ampex 
President George Long announced Thursday. 

Walter Goldsmith is in charge of video cus- 
tomer relations while Charles P. Ginzberg, 
project engineer for development of the video 
tape recorder, has been named chief video 
'engineer. Senior video project engineer is 
Charles E. Anderson. Ampex is increasing its 
engineering staff by 150% and adding 50,000 
sq. ft. of production facility at its Redwood City, 
Calif., plant to handle the tv recorder. 

Before the Ampex tv tape recorder demon- 
stration Tuesday at CBS Television City, Holly- 
wood, for the Advertising Assn. of The West 
(story, page 29), Ampex officials met with 
executives of KTTV (TV) and KHJ-TV Los 
Angeles and KRON-TV San Francisco to ex- 
plore potential of recorder in addition to 
immediate function of delayed telecasting. 

Since the NARTB convention last April, 
Ampex has not been soliciting new orders be- 
cause of production backlog yet to handle. Some 
70 units were ordered by 35 stations while CBS- 
TV bought the first three prototypes and since 
has ordered two more, to be delivered this fall. 
After three units go to NBC-TV, CBS-TV also 
has ordered seven production units for total of 
12 machines and is understood to have planned 
progressive acquisition of additional units later. 

Ampex Plans Free Service 

At Both National Conventions 

AMPEX Corp., Redwood City, Calif., has an- 
nounced plans to furnish materials and record- 
ing services free to accredited broadcast repre- 
sentatives covering the Democratic and Repub- 
lican nominating conventions in August. Am- 
pex will install complete recording studios, 
equipped with Ampex Model 350 console re- 
corders and Model 600 lightweight portable 
recorders at hotel headquarters and convention 
site for both conventions. 

The Ampex studios in Chicago for the Dem- 
ocrats, who convene Aug. 13, will be located on 
the second floor of the north wing of the Inter- 
national Ampitheater and the Conrad Hilton 
Hotel. For the Republican convention, begin- 
ning in San Francisco Aug. 20, Ampex will 
occupy studios in the North Barn at the Cow 
Palace and the Fairmont Hotel. The studios 
will be open several days in advance of the 
conventions so that newsmen may cover the 
arrival of their home state delegations. 

Microphones for the studios will be furnished 
by Altec-Lansing Corp., and recording tape will 
be supplied by Minnesota Mining & Manufac- 
turing Co. Ampex will provide all necessary 
supplies for addressing and mailing of recorded 
tapes to radio stations throughout the country. 



CUP THE CUPPER 9 



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Box 806-O Peoria, Illinois 



$22 Billion in Electronics 
By 1965, Sylvania Men Aver 

AN ANNUAL $22 billion or more electronics 
business by 1965 was seen last week by several 
key executives of Sylvania Electric Products 
Inc., who met with the firm's radio-tv distribu- 
tors at a three-day conference in Buffalo on 
the forthcoming sales picture. 

Not only will the industry set a new record 
of over $11.5 billion this year, said Sylvania's 
chairman and president, Don G. Mitchell, but 
tv set production will surpass the 7.5 million 
mark by the end of this year. Color set pro- 
duction, Mr. Mitchell predicted, will reach 
275,000 units this year, of which 200,000 will 
ultimately reach the consumer; by the end of 
1957, he added, color set production will climb 
to 900,000, with black-and-white set produc- 
tion dropping to 6.7 million units. 

"Color television," Mr. Mitchell declared, 
"is definitely on the way . . . However, it 
will be some time before color sets will be 
marketed in relatively large quantities and it 
will be four or five years before color sales 
catch up to black-and-white." 

Mr. Mitchell and his vice president in charge 
of operations, Marion E. Pettegrew, under- 
scored that point when they introduced Syl- 
vania's second and third color set model to 
date, the "Granada" and "Saratoga," retailing 
at $595 and $695, respectively. Sylvania's 
first color set, introduced last year, retails 
at $850. 

WHYY-TV Buys Equipment 

WHYY-TV, Philadelphia ch. 35 educational 
outlet, has ordered a $300,000 llVi kw trans- 
milter and related studio equipment from RCA, 
Richard Burdick. the station's managing direc- 
tor, announced last week. Studio equipment 
will include three image orthicon cameras, one 
vidicon camera for slides and 16 mm films and 
kinescope recording equipment. WHYY-TV has 
not as yet announced a target date. 

Three Outlets Order From GE 

GENERAL ELECTRIC Co. reported last week 
it had shipped a 10 kw transmitter to KLAS-TV 
Las Vegas, Nev. (ch. 8) and a six-bay antenna 
to WMBR-TV Jacksonville. Fla. (ch. 4). GE 
also has an order from WCYB-TV Bristol, Va. 
(ch. 5) for August delivery of a 30 kw trans- 
mitter and three-bay batwing antenna. 

DuMont Ships to WDBJ-TV 

A 50 kw transmitter, with associated equipment, 
was shipped last week by Allen B. DuMont 
Labs to WDBJ-TV Roanoke, Va. (ch. 7), as a 
replacement for the station's 5 kw transmitter. 
The station reports that the power increase will 
boost its effective radiated power from 27.78 
kw to 316 kw. 

MANUFACTURING SHORTS 

Crescent Industries Inc., Chicago, to introduce 
new line of high fidelity phonographs, tape re- 
corders and record-changers at 1956 Music 
Trades Industry Show in New York July 23-26. 

Philco Corp. Government & Industrial Div., 
Phila., reports Telesistema Mexicano S. A. 
(XEW-TV, XEQ-TV. XHTV [TV], XEX-TV, 
XHGC-TV Mexico City and XHNL-TV Mon- 
terrey) purchase of 1-kw vhf transmitter. 
Transmitter and associated studio equipment 
to be installed at network's plant, Guadalajara, 
Mexico's second largest city. 

Sylvania Electric Products Inc., N. Y. reports 
installation of 1,050 special combination radio- 
tv sets at Toronto (Canada) Royal York Hotel, 



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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 79 



MANUFACTURING 



AWARDS 



replacing two-channel radio unit system in- 
stalled in 1929. Firm also announced 500 tv 
sets being installed in Buffalo, N. Y., Statler 
Hotel. 

Affton Industries, St. Louis, is introducing a 
long-playing recording tape, said to have base 
with greater tensile strength than normal tape 
bases. 

RCA, Camden, N. J., has reported shipment of 
25-kw transmitter to KIDO-TV Boise. 

Electro-Voice Inc., Buchanan, Mich., announces 
new Model 649 miniature lavalier dynamic 
microphone for tv. Unit measures 2 11/16 
x % in. and weighs 1.3 ou., is omnidirectional 
and can be held in hand or used on stand as 
well as around performer's neck. Frequency 
response is 70-13,000 cps. List price is $115. 

General Electric Co., Syracuse, N. Y., has an- 
nounced price reductions ranging up to 27% 
on ten new transistors used in portable and 
table model radios and high fidelity audio sys- 
tems. Lowered prices eventually could be re- 
flected in price reductions of as much as 20% 
on transistorized portable radios in 1957 mod- 
els, G-E says. 

Turner Co., Cedar Rapids, Iowa, announces new 
dynamic microphone, model 124, usable on 
stand or as hand unit. Low-cost instrument is 
available with 12-ft. removable cable, single- 
conductor shielded on high impedance models 
and two-conductor shielded on low impedance 
models. List price is $49 and shockmount stand 
is $8. 

MANUFACTURING PEOPLE 

Dr. Carlo L. Calosi, founder and manager of 
Raytheon Mfg. Co.'s research department, Chi- 
cago, recently on leave of absence to serve 
Finmecanica, Raytheon's Italian manufacturing 
licensee, has rejoined company in U. S. as vice 
president and consultant in microwave and 
power tube operations. 

Ira J. Kaar, engineering department manager, 
General Electric Co. electronic division, to Hoff- 
man Electronics Corp., L. A., as vice president 
and engineering director. 

William L. Unger, administrative assistant chief 
engineer, Packard-Bell Co. (tv, radio sets, hi-fi 
equipment), L. A., named assistant to vice presi- 
dent of technical products division. Kenneth 
L. Jones, formerly engineering manager of Syl- 
vania Electric Products Microwave Tube Lab- 
oratory, to Packard-Bell as assistant chief 
engineer for technical products division. 

Donald J. Hughes, advertising and sales promo- 
tion supervisor for electronic products, Sylvania 
Electric Products Inc., N. Y., appointed adver- 
tising manager of electronic products sales 
department. 

Richard A. Wilson (Rear Admiral, Ret., U.S.N.) 
to Magnavox Co., Fort Wayne, Ind., as coor- 
dinator of plans and programs. 

Frank R. Buchanan, administrator of product 
planning control and special analysis, RCA, to 
controller of RCA semiconductor division, 
Harrison, N. J. 

Brig. Gen. David Sarnoff, RCA board chairman, 
named honorary chairman, The American Mu- 
seum of Immigration's Greater New York 
Committee. Campaign called "Operation 
Unity," intends to raise $5 million to set up 
museum and to provide special endowment 
fund for educational program. Museum will be- 
come part of Statue of Liberty National Monu- 
ment and will be administered by Dept. of 
Interior's National Park Service. 



ANNUAL AWARDS BY AAW 
ARE MADE AT CONVENTION 

Radio jingle prepared for 

Southern Pacific Railroad and 

tv spot created for Chevrolet 

by Five-Star Productions are 

winners of top honors. 

NEWEST radio jingle prepared for the South- 
ern Pacific Railroad by Song Ad Film-Radio 
Productions, Hollywood, took top awards in 
the craft competitions of the Advertising Assn. 
of the West 53d annual convention last week 
as a tv spot created for Chevrolet by Five-Star 
Productions, Hollywood, won first honors in 
that medium. 

Foote, Cone & Belding's San Francisco 
office, which is testing the Southern Pacific 
spot on stations in both that city and Los An- 
geles, reported the radio campaign "very suc- 
cessful" and pointed out that the jingle and its 
train-rhythm style permit it to be fully inte- 
grated by disc jockeys within their programs 
as though it were a hit tune itself. Song Ads 
President Robert Sande wrote and sang the 
jingle, backed by four vocalists and instru- 
mental group directed by Vice President Larry 
Greene. 

Agency placing the winning Chevrolet tv 
commercial in western markets is Campbell- 
Ewald Co., Detroit. 

Full list of radio and tv awards follows: 

RADIO ADVERTISING AWARDS 

Perpetual Trophy — Donated by Vancouver 
Advertising & Sales Bureau, Vancouver, B. C, 
for best over-all job in all classifications, won 
by Southern Pacific Company, San Francisco; 
spot announcement in city of 100,000 or more 
population; agency, Foote, Cone & Belding, San 
Francisco; producer, Song Ad Film-Radio Pro- 
ductions, Hollywood. 

COMMERCIAL PROGRAMS 

(A) Prepared and used primarily in cities of 
100,000 or over, or networks, won by Sturdy 
Dog Food Company, Burbank, Calif.; program, 
Sturdy Dog Food Newscast; station, KBIG 
Avalon, Calif.; agency, Mogge-Privett Inc., Los 
Angeles. 

Honorable Mention: Associated Products 
Corp., Puente, Calif.; program, Sakrete Ready- 
mix Cement; station, KBIG Avalon, Calif.; 
agency, Glenn Advertising Agency, Los An- 
geles. 

(B) Prepared and used in cities of less than 
100,000, won by Johnson Pontiac Co., Colo- 
rado Springs; program, Sabena Lounge; station, 
KRDO Colorado Springs; producer, KRDO Ra- 
dio Copy Dept. 

COMMERCIAL SPOT ANNOUNCEMENTS 

(A) Prepared and used primarily in cities of 
100,000 or over, or on nets, won by Southern 
Pacific Co., San Francisco; agency, Foote, Cone 
& Belding, San Francisco; producer, Song Ad 
Film-Radio Productions, Hollywood. 

Special Honorable Mention: Delsom Estates, 
Devon Gardens, New Westminister, B. C; sta- 
tion, CKNW New Westminster, B. C. 

Honorable Mention: L. F. D. Chevrolet 
Dealers; station, KMPC Hollywood; agency, 
Eisaman & Johns, Los Angeles, also Eastside 
Old Tap Lager beer, Los Angeles; agency, J. 
Walter Thompson Co., Los Angeles; producer, 
Song Ad Film-Radio Productions, Hollywood. 

Special Award for Successful Handling of a 
Difficult Sales Problem, won by Continental 



Air Lines, Denver; agency, Galen E. Broyles 
Co., Denver; station, KOA and 17 others. 

Special Award for Effective Continuity Estab- 
lishing Theme, won by Bergermeister beer, 
Hollywood; agency, Batten, Barton, Durstine 
& Osborn, Hollywood; producer, Song Ad 
Film-Radio Productions, Hollywood. 

(B) Prepared and used primarily in cities of 
less than 100,000, won by Frontier Airlines, 
Denver; agency, Rippey, Henderson, Kostka & 
Co., Denver. 

Honorable Mention: Littletown, Tucson, 
Ariz.; station, KO PA-AM Tucson; producers, 
Don Phillips, Ed Tucker, KOPO-AM Tucson. 

TELEVISION COMMERCIAL AWARDS 

SWEEPSTAKES AWARD, donated by Hol- 
lywood Advertising Club for best over-all entry 
selected from the winners of all classifications, 
won by Chevrolet Motor Co., Flint, Mich.; 
agency, Campbell-Ewald Co., Detroit; pro- 
ducer, Five-Star Productions, Hollywood. 

CLASSIFICATION 1, local advertisers, film 
commercials (one minute or less), won by 
Broadway Merchants, Salt Lake City, Utah; 
agency, none; producer, Dan Rainger, Salt 
Lake City. 

CLASSIFICATION 2, regional advertisers, 
film commercials (one minute or less), won by 
Rheingold Brewing Co., Los Angeles; agency, 
Foote, Cone & Belding, Los Angeles; producer, 
UPA Pictures Inc., Burbank, Calif. 

Honorable Mention (No preferential rating): 
Bowman Biscuit Co., Denver, Colo.; agency, 
Ball & Davidson, Denver, Colo.; producer, 
Alexander Film Co., Colorado Springs, Colo.; 
W. P. Fuller Co., San Francisco; agency, 
Young & Rubicam, San Francisco; producer, 
Academy Productions, Los Angeles, and Bank 
of America, San Francisco; agency, Charles P. 
Johnson Co., San Francisco; producer, Story- 
board Inc., Hollywood. 

CLASSIFICATION 3, national advertisers, 
film commercials (one minute or less), won by 
Chevrolet Motor Co., Flint, Mich.; agency, 
Campbell-Ewald Co., Detroit; producer, Five- 
Star Productions, Hollywood. 

Honorable Mention: Hills Bros. Coffee Inc., 
San Francisco; agency, N. W. Ayer & Son Inc., 
San Francisco; producer, Johnson and Siday, 
New York. 

CLASSIFICATION 4, general, live or kine, 
any length, won by Utah Copper Div., Kenne- 
cott Copper Corp., Salt Lake City; agency, 
Adamson, Buchman & Associates, Salt Lake 



Promotion Managers Contest 
Won by KARD-TV's Leon Bert 

LEON BERT, promotion manager of KARD- 
TV Wichita, Kan., has been named first place 
winner of the eight-state, 22-station Skelly Oil 

Co. promotion man- 
agers contest. 

The contest was 
to select the most 
outstanding promo- 
tion and merchan- 
dising support of- 
fered Skelly Oil's 
weekly Waterfront 
television program, 
for the period of 
April 29 to May 31. 

Runners-up were 
WDSM-TV, Duluth, 
Minn.; WKOW-TV, 
Madison, Wis., and 
WMT-TV, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Meanwhile, Skelly reported that retail sales 
had jumped 103% in the greater Wichita area. 




MR. BERT 



Page 80 



July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



City; producer, Nathan Berlin-Charles Sweeney, 
Salt Lake City. 

Honorable Mention: Pacific Telephone & 
Telegraph Co., San Francisco; agency, Batten, 
Barton, Durstine & Osborn, San Francisco; 
producer, Volcano Productions. Hollywood, 
and Jet Glas Water Heater, Los Angeles; agen- 
cy, Hixson & Jorgensen, Los Angeles; producer, 
Song Ad Film-Radio Productions. Hollywood. 

SPECIAL AWARD, low budget, won by 
Oven Magic, San Jose, Calif.; agency, Long 
Advertising Inc., San Jose; producer. Motion 
Picture Service. San Francisco. 

Ed Graham Wins Ad Award 

ED GRAHAM, 27, formerly a copywriter at 
Young & Rubicam, New York, last week was 
named the "Outstanding Young Advertising 
Man of 1956" by the Assn. of Advertising Men 
and Women. Mr. Graham was honored by the 
organization at a meeting in New York for his 
creative work in formulating the Piel's beer ad- 
vertising campaign centered around the mythi- 
cal Piel brothers, Bert and Harry. Mr. Graham 
recently left Y & R to form his own tv com- 
mercial company — Goulding, Elliott, Graham 
Inc. — in partnership with Ray Goulding and 
Bob Elliott (the voices of Bert and Harry). 
A special citation for "Outstanding Achieve- 
ment in Advertising" was presented to Louis 
G. Cowan, CBS vice president, for creating 
CBS-TV $64,000 Question. 

AWARD SHORTS 

KCMO Kansas City, Mo., received certificate 
of merit from Art Directors Club of Kansas 
City for best newspaper ad in annual competi- 
tion. Entry was prepared by Potts-Woodbury, 
station's agency. 

KMOX St. Louis cited in certificate of apprecia- 
tion by St. Louis Red Cross Blood Program for 
station's series on national blood program. 

Larrabee Assoc., Washington, won Advertising 
& Human Welfare Award from local Com- 
munity Chest Federation. Award, given for ad- 
vertising that resulted in successful campaign, 
represents first citation of its kind given by 
Washington Chest. 

Mike Schaffer, promotion director, WDBJ-TV 
Roanoke, Va., received certificate of apprecia- 
tion and title of honorary naval recruiter for 
work promoting Navy Log, CBS-TV show car- 
ried by WDBJ-TV. 

Jim Dooley, m.c, Let's Go Fishing on WTVJ 
(TV) Miami, Fla., given Lions Club Achieve- 
ment Award by Key Biscayne Lions Club for 
contributing to benefit Dade County youth. 

KHOL-TV Holdrege, and KGFW Kearney, 
both Neb., presented with commendation 
awards by Neb. National Guard. Awards given 
in conjunction with National Guard Exposition 
Days in Kearney. 

L. E. Caster, president of WREX-TV Rockford, 
111., cited by local Commission on Human Rela- 
tions for helping public education through tele- 
vision, contributions to social causes and group 
hospitalization plans in his business enterprises. 

Broadcast Music Inc., N. Y., cited by American 
Legion for "Fourth of July and Our Children" 
programming service, which BMI is currently 
mailing to radio-tv station subscribers. Manual 
contains information regarding safety hazards 
involved in firecrackers and suggestions for 
promoting Independence Day. 

Olmsted Sound Studios, N.Y., was presented 
award for "outstanding and imaginative decor 
in American industry" by Fashion Council of 
Upholstery Trade Schools, making second suc- 
cessive year that Olmsted has been honored by 
council. 



INTERNATIONAL 



CBC's Board of Governors 
Refuses New Station Bids 

THE board of governors of the Canadian Broad- 
casting Corp., meeting June 22 at Ottawa, re- 
fused all new applicants for am and tv stations. 
Approvals were given only for share transfers, 
changes of corporate name and expansion of 
CFRG Gravelbourg, Sask.. to nighttime opera- 
tion with 250 watts on 1230 kc. 

New radio stations at Calgary, Winnipeg, Bur- 
lington (Ont.), Welland (Ont.) and Toronto, 
were denied, primarily because the board felt 
there were already enough stations in the areas 
giving service. The Toronto request was for an 
fm station, which had been turned down last 
year and which would have been used to some 
extent for storecasting service. 

Applicants for tv stations at Yorkton, Sask., 
and Rouyn, Que., were turned down, the first 
because financial basis of applicants was held 
not satisfactory, and the second was turned 
down for further study in view of petitions 
from the area that CBC open a station there. 

Power increase for CKOT Tillsonburg, from 
250 watts on 1510 kc to 1 kw on 1510 kc was 
deferred for further study. 

Canadian Radio-Tv System 
Backed by Station Manager 

PRESENT SET-UP of Canadian radio and 
television, with government-owned and private 
stations, is the only workable system for Can- 
ada, according to Finlay H. MacDonald, man- 
ager of CJCH Halifax, N. S., and a former 
president of the Canadian Assn. of Radio & 
Television Broadcasters. Mr. MacDonald aired 
this view before the Royal Commission on 
Broadcasting at Halifax in mid-June, pointing 
out that in his opinion a private television net- 
work is not feasible at present. 

If second tv stations are to be licensed to 
private owners in cities now having one station, 
these second stations should also form part of 
a second tv network controlled by the Canadian 
Broadcasting Corp. Mr. MacDonald felt that 
demand for an independent regulatory body 
could be met by having two members of the 
CBC board of governors, in addition to the 
chairman, placed on full-time salaries. He crit- 
icized CBC for its administrative structure 
which he said deprived staff of initiative, and 
for what he termed its pre-occupation with tv 
to the neglect of its radio responsibilities. 

CFCL-TV Timmins on Air 

CFCL-TV Timmins, Ont., began telecasting to 
northern Ontario's gold mining region on June 
30, on ch. 6. The station, which is program- 
ming 75% in English and 25% in French, is 
affiliated with CFCL, a French-language radio 
station at Timmins. Owner is Conrad Lavigne. 
Rene Barrett, general manager of CFCL-TV, 
plans at least one hour local live program 
nightly. Omer Renaud & Co., Toronto, repre- 
sents the station in Canada, Joseph H. McGill- 
vra in the United States. 

Canadian Tv Set Sales Drop 

SALES of television sets declined 14% in the 
first four months of this year, according to 
figures released by the Radio-Electronics-Tele- 
vision Manufacturers Assn. of Canada, Toronto, 
Ont. Sales of sets to dealers in the January- 
April period totaled 168,635 valued at $50,- 
478,605, compared to 197,183 sets at $60,754,- 
034 in the January-April 1955 period. 



1-2 sales punch 

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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 81 



INTERNATIONAL 



EDUCATION 



Buss Heads Canadian Group 

BOB BUSS, manager of CHAT Medicine Hat, 
Alta., has been elected president of the Western 
Assn. of Broadcasters, succeeding Vern Dallin 
of CFQC-AM-TV Saskatoon, Sask. WAB di- 
rectors elected were Gil Seabrook, CJIB Ver- 
non, B. C; Norm Botterill, CJOC and CJLH- 
TV Lethbridge, Alta.; Vern Dallin; Jack Blick, 
CJOB Winnipeg, Man., and Chuck Rudd, 
CHUB Nanaimo, B. C. 

INTERNATIONAL PEOPLE 

Lorrie Potts has purchased Toronto office of 
James L. Alexander Co., station representative 
firm, where he has been manager for some time. 
Company name is to be changed to Lorrie Potts 
& Co. Montreal office of Alexander Co. con- 
tinues to be managed by Jim Sheridan. 

W. H. Clerk, supervisor of commercial radio 
and television at Canadian Broadcasting Corp., 
Toronto, Ont., to supervisor of radio and tv 
at Young & Rubicam Ltd., Toronto, succeeding 
Bill Byles, resigned to join H. N. Stovin & Co., 
station representative firm at Toronto, as execu- 
tive vice president. 

Dick Sheppard, film sales manager of S. W. 
Caldwell Ltd., Toronto, film distributors, to su- 
pervisor of tv production at McKim Adv. Ltd., 
Toronto, Ont. 

Keith Chase, tv director of McKim Adv. Ltd., 
Montreal, and prior to that sales manager of 
CFPL London, Ont., to sales and promotion 
manager of CKCW-TV Moncton, N. B. 

Ross Hamilton to sales manager of CKNX-TV 
Wingham, Ont., succeeding Vin Dittmer, re- 
signed after more than decade with CKNX- 
AM-TV. 

Gilles Morin to sales representative, Montreal 
office of Jos. A. Hardy & Co. Ltd., station rep- 
resentative. 

Donald Ferguson, formerly sales representative 
of All Canada Radio-Television Ltd., Toronto, 
Ont., to radio-tv timebuyer of Harold F. Stan- 
field Ltd., Toronto. 

Earl Conner, chief engineer of CFAC Calgary, 
Alta., elected chairman of engineering section, 
Western Assn. of Broadcasters at annual meet- 
ing in Vancouver. He succeeds Bill Forst of 
CKOM Saskatoon, Sask. 

INTERNATIONAL SHORTS 

CKSL London, Ont., has started operation with 
5 kw on 1290 kc. J. Lyman Potts, formerly of 
CKOC Hamilton, Ont., is manager, John C. 
Morris sales manager and Francis R. Kirton 
program manager. Station is represented in 
Canada by National Broadcast Sales and Hor- 
ace N. Stovin & Co., and in U.S. by Cana- 
dian Station Representatives Inc. 

CKSW Swift Current, Sask., now on air with 
250 w on 1400 kc. D. W. Scott is general man- 
ager, Wilf Gilbey station manager and Alec 
Maxwell commercial manager. Station is rep- 
resented in Canada by Radio Representatives 
Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Standard Brands Ltd., Montreal, Que., and 
Frigidaire Products of Canada Ltd., Toronto, 
Ont., jointly begin on July 4 sponsorship of new 
summer half-hour variety show The Barris Beat, 
with Alex Barris, Toronto Globe & Mail thea- 
tre critic, as master of ceremonies. Program is 
being aired on CBC tv network, Wed. 9-9:30 
p.m. Agencies are J. Walter Thompson Co., 
Montreal (Standard Brands), and Baker Adv. 
Agency, Toronto (Frigidaire). 



Fund Spends $500,000 
In Media Over 3 Years 

OF THE $5.4 million spent the past three years 
by the Fund for the Republic, more than 
$500,000 has gone into projects bearing directly 
on radio, tv or both. In addition, there is more 
than $85,000 granted but not yet spent on 
projects which may bear directly on the broad- 
cast media. 

These figures, contained in a three-year re- 
port summarizing the fund's activities, were 
released June 22 in New York. A breakdown 
includes $127,482 for blacklisting study in 
movies and radio-tv; $195,221 for general work 
in radio-tv, encompassing attempted placement 
on programs on air; $20,000 for experimental 
tv films (aired by KRON-TV San Francisco); 
$5,000 for American Friends Service Commit- 
tee's radio tape program (aired on rural radio 
outlets and school systems); $4,211 for record- 
ings of Senate Judiciary Subcommittee hear- 
ings on constitutional rights (aired on various 
radio stations); $46,541 for tv series to feature 
Herbert L. Block, cartoonist for Washington 
Post & Times Herald, which failed to materi- 
alize; $65,383 for experimental expansion of 
newsfilm and radio recording, started in Cali- 
fornia last September; $59,799 for tv script 
competition (written off by fund); $17,937 (not 
including sums for actual awards) to Robert E. 
Sherwood tv awards, and others. The organiza- 
tion now has $10.5 million in reserve. 

In general, the projects authorized bore on 
such subjects as civil liberties, constitutional 
rights, education, freedom and justice. Com- 
menting on its extensive, near $200,000 project 
of exploring and developing ways to place 
programs on air "that might otherwise not be 
shown," the fund noted that pilot film of half- 
hour series entitled "Challenge," based on 
loyalty oaths, was made and though "widely 
praised" by people in "industry, advertising and 
television . . . the sale effort was a failure." 
Fund now is distributing prints on non-com- 
mercial basis. 

Other series being prepared under this proj- 
ect include "Integration in St. Louis" and "A 
Date With Liberty." A number of pilots of Al 
Capp, filmed series starring cartoonist in com- 
mentaries on current events, were "reluctantly" 
abandoned because producer and fund could 
not agree on acceptable format. 

The organization also wrote off its original, 
near $60,000 tv script competition, saying it 
"must be regarded as failure." In competi- 
tion on historical role of civil liberties in 
America, 19 prizes were given for hour-long 
dramas and half-hour documentaries with plan 
to have some scripts produced on commercial 
tv. Concluded fund: "Despite efforts by the 
fund and the authors' agents, the attempt was 
unsuccessful." 

Closed-Circuit Tv System 
Planned for Md. Schools 

TELEVISION will become an important part 
of the curriculums at two high schools and six 
elementary schools of Washington County, Md., 
under a program opening in September. By 
1958 all 47 schools in the county system will be 
equipped for closed circuit tv instruction. 

Plans for the educational project were an- 
nounced Tuesday by William M. Brish, county 
superintendent. Over 6,000 pupils in the eight 
schools will receive daily instruction by tv. 
Member manufacturers of Radio-Electronics-Tv 
Mfrs. Assn. are donating equipment. Fund for 
the Advancement of Education, a Ford Founda- 
tion project, is financing the training of per- 
sonnel and supervising the program. Also par- 



ticipating are U. S. Office of Education, Na- 
tional Education Assn. and Joint Council on 
Educational Television. 

Two main objects of the test, Mr. Brish said, 
are to discover ways of using closed-circuit tv 
to improve public education and to test ways 
of meeting the teacher shortage in the face of 
increasing enrollment and lack of facilities. 

First tv instruction will be offered at the high 
school level in 9th grade science, 10th grade 
mathematics, 10th grade U. S. history and 12th 
grade English. Elementary work will include 
6th grade science, 5th grade arithmetic, 4th 
grade social studies, and reading and number 
readiness in the first three grades. During the 
first term no pupil will receive tv instruction in 
more than one course. 

A summer workshop will be held in Hagers- 
town July 9-Aug. 17, with 40 teachers partici- 
pating. 

High School Students Get 
College Credit on KQED (TV) 

OUTSTANDING high school students in the 
San Francisco area will be able to earn three 
hours of college credit this fall via a television 
experiment being conducted by San Francisco 
State College and educational KQED (TV) 
there. 

Between 150 and 200 students will take a 
psychology course, which is to be financed by 
a $125,177 grant from the Fund for Advance- 
ment of Education. Two weekly 45-minute 
tv lectures will be supplemented by a two-hour 
campus discussion every other week. Philco 
Corp. is participating by making tv sets avail- 
able to each of the high schools. 

The college will present four other regular 
undergraduate courses on KQED this fall. 

Radio-Tv Institute Begins 

SIXTH annual Barnard College-NBC Sum- 
mer Institute of Radio & Tv opened last week 
at the NBC studios in New York for six weeks 
of classes devoted to various phases of radio 
and television. The institute is designed to 
introduce beginners to radio and tv for applica- 
tion in the community, in education and in the 
commercial field. NBC reported a registration 
of 56 students. 

EDUCATION PEOPLE 

Norris E. Grover, chief engineer, WKAR East 
Lansing, Mich., non-commercial station of 
Mich. State U., retired after 28 years. 

James E. Lynch, instructor in radio-tv, State 
U. of Iowa, Iowa City, to Indiana U., Bloom- 
ington, as assistant professor of radio and tele- 
vision and program supervisor. 

EDUCATION SHORTS 
WFAA Dallas, Tex., cooperating with South- 
ern Methodist U., Dallas, for second year 
in presentation of summer workshop course at 
station's studios. Station staffers aid in direct- 
ing classes. 

Allen B. DuMont Labs, Clifton, N.J., has in- 
stituted tuition aid plan for salaried employes 
who take engineering or science courses at col- 
lege level. Under plan, employe who receives 
grade "A" or equivalent is refunded 100% of 
the tuition by the company; grade "B" 75% 
and grade "C," 50%. 

Raytheon Mfg. Co., Waltham, Mass., has in- 
stituted new engineering development program 
to encourage employes to attend evening col- 
lege classes and obtain scientific training. Quali- 
fied employes will be granted tuition and other 
fees and stipend for books and study at ac- 
credited colleges and universities with evening 
divisions, such as Boston U. and Northeastern U. 



Page 82 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



B*T TELESTATUS 



A monthly situation report on 
present and planned tv stations 
and television network shows 



JULY 1956 

Total U. S. Stations on Air: 474 

(Commercial: 454; Educational: 20) 

Total Cities With Tv Stations: 301 
Total Tv Homes: 35,000,000 

(U. S. Census Bureau, February 1956) 



ALABAMA 

ANDALUSIA 1 — 

WAIQ (*2) 3/9/55-July 
BIRMINGHAM— 

► WABT (13) NBC, ABC; Blair; 366,400; N; $800 

► WBIQ (*10) 

► WBRC-TV (6) CBS; Katz; 366,400; N; $800 
WJLN-TV (48) 12/10/52-Unknown 

DECATURf— 

► WMSL-TV (23) CBS, NBC; McGillvra; 31,800; 
$150 

DOTHAN— 

► WTVY (9) CBS; ABC; Young; 37,200; N; $150 
MOBILE— 

► WALA-TV (10) NBC, ABC; Headley-Reed; 

192,000; N; $450 

► WKRG-TV (5) CBS; Avery-Knodel; 187,000; 

N; $450 
MONTGOMERY— 

► WCOV-TV (20) CBS, ABC; Raymer; 78,600; N; 

$200 

► WSFA-TV (12) NBC; Katz; 129.000; N; $450 
MUNFORDf— 

WTIQ (*7) 
SELMAf — 

WSLA (8) 2/52/54-Unknown 

ARIZONA 

FLAGSTAFF— 

Flagstaff Telecasting Co. (9) 5/29/56-Unknown 
MESA (PHOENIX)— 

► KVAR (12) NBC; Raymer; 148,880; N; $450 
PHOENIX— 

► KOOL-TV (10) CBS; Hollingbery; 175,000; N; 

$500 

► KPHO-TV (5) Katz; 143,880; N; $360 

► KTVK (3) ABC; Weed; 175,000; N. LF, LS; $400 
TUCSON— 

► KDWI-TV (9) Headley-Reed; $350 
►KOPO-TV (13) CBS; Hollingbery; 54,253; $300 

► KVOA-TV (4) NBC, ABC; Branham; 54.253; 

$300 
YUMAf— 

► KIVA (11) CBS. NBC, ABC; Ravmer; 27.500; 

$200 

KYAT (13) 1/25/56-Unknown 
ARKANSAS 

EL DORADO— 

► KRBB (10) NBC, ABC; Pearson; 55,000; $200 
FORT SMITH— t 

► KFSA-TV (22) NBC, ABC, CBS; Pearson; 40,- 

600; $200 

KNAC-TV (5) Rambeau; 6/3/54-Unknown 
HOT SPRINGS— 

KSPS (9) 2/16/56-Unknown 
JONESBOROf— 

KBTM-TV (8) 1/12/55-Unknown 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



LITTLE ROCK— 

► KARK-TV (4) NBC; Petry; 159.904; N; $450 

► KTHV (11) CBS; Branham; 159,148; N; $450 

► KATV (7) (See Pine Bluff) 
PINE BLUFF — 

*-KATV (7) ABC; Avery-Knodel; 118,694; N; $450 
TEXARKANA— 

► KCMC-TV (6) (See Texarkana, Tex.) 

CALIFORNIA 

BAKERSFIEID— 

► KBAK-TV (29) ABC; Weed; 100,000; $300 

► KERO-TV (10) NBC, CBS; Hollingbery; 183,000; 

N; $500 

BERKELEY (SAN FRANCISCO)— 

+■ KQED (*9) 
CHICO— 

>■ KHSL-TV (12) CBS, ABC; Averv-Knodel: 70,- 

900; $250 
CORONAf — 

KCOA (52) 9/16/53-Unknown 
EUREKA 

► KIEM-TV (3) CBS, ABC, NBC; Hoag-Blair; 

31,000; $250 
FRESNO— 

>■ KFRE-TV (12) CBS; Blair; $650 

► KJEO (47) ABC; Branham; 170.000; N. LL. LS; 

$500 

► KMJ-TV (24) NBC; Raymer; 170.000; N. LF, LS; 

$550 

KBID-TV (53) See footnote 
LOS ANGELES 

► KABC-TV (7) ABC; Katz; 2,444,064; $2,000 

► KCOP (13) Petrv; 2.444,064; $1,250 

► KHJ-TV (9) H-R; 2.444.064; N; $1,200 

► KNXT (2) CBS: CBS Spot Sis.; 2,444,064; N, LS. 

T F. LL; $2 700 

► KRCA (4) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 2.444,064; N, LS. 

LF; $3,600 

► KTLA (5) Raymer; 2.444.064; N. LS. LF. LL; 

$1,750 

► KTTV (11) Blair; 2.444.064; $2,000 
KBIC-TV (22) 2/10/52-Unkown 

MODESTOf— 

KTRB-TV (14) 2/17/54-Unkno\vn 
OAKLAND (SAN FRANCISCO)— 

Channel Two Inc. (2) Initial Decision 6/20/56 
REDDING— 

KVIP (7) 3/28/56-August; Branham; $225 
SACRAMENTO 

► KBET-TV (10) CBS; H-R: 390.000; N, LL. LF, 

LS: $700 

► KCCC-TV (40) ABC; Weed; 165,000; $450 

► KCRA-TV (3) NBC; Petry; 354,401; N, LF, LS; 

$750 

KGMS-TV (46) 3/2/56-Unkno\vn 
SALINAS (MONTEREY) — 

► KSBW-TV (8) CBS, ABC, NBC; H-R; 110,879; 

$350 

SAN DIEGO— 

► KFMB-TV (8) CBS, ABC: Petry; 418.997; N; 

$900 

>■ KFSD-TV (10) NBC, ABC; Katz; 418,997; N; 
$850 

SAN FRANCISCO— 

► KGO-TV (7) ABC: Blair; 1.263.097; $1,700 

► KPIX-TV (5) CBS; Katz; 1,263.097; N. LS; $1,700 

► KRON-TV (4) NBC: Peters. Griffin, Woodward; 

1,263.097; N. LS, LF, LL; $1,500. 

► KSAN-TV (32) Stars National; 325.000; $225 
KBAY-TV (20) 3/11/53-Unknown (granted STA 

9/15/54) 

SAN JOSEf— 

► KNTV (11) Boiling; 548,159; $350 
SAN LUIS OBISPO — 

► KVEC-TV (6) ABC, CBS; H-R; 102,966; $200 
SANTA BARBARA— 

► KEYT (3) ABC, CBS, NBC; Hollingbery; 227,- 

918; $450 

STOCKTONf— 

► KOVR (13) Avery-Knodel; 1,141,290; $800 
TULARE (FRESNO)— 

► KVVG (27) 150,000: $325 

COLORADO 
COLORADO SPRINGS— 

► KKTV (11) CBS, ABC; Boiling; 61,701; $200 

► KRDO-TV (13) NBC; Pearson; 44,000; $175 



SAVE this monthly Telestatus section 
which is perforated for your convenience. 
Additional copies are available. Write 
Readers Service Dept., Broadcasting • 
Telecasting, 1735 DeSales St., N. W., 
Washington 6, D. C. • 



DENVER— 

► KBTV (9) ABC; Peters, Griffin, Woodward; 

377,689; $650 

► KLZ-TV (7) CBS; Katz; 377,689; N; $700 

► KOA-TV (4) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 377,689; N; 

$650 

► KRMA-TV (*6) 

► KTVR (2) Hoag-Blair; 377,689; N; $500 
GRAND JUNCTIONf— 

► KREX-TV (5) NBC, CBS, ABC; Holman; $150 
MONTROSE— 

KFXJ-TV (10) 2/23/56-7/15/56 (Satellite of 
KREX-TV Grand Junction) 
PUEBLO— 

► KCSJ-TV (5) NBC; Pearson; 56,000; $150 

CONNECTICUT 

BRIDGEPORT — 

► WICC (43) ABC; Young; 72.340; $200 
WCTB (*71) 1/29/53-Unknown 

HARTFORD — 

► WGTH-TV (18) CBS; H-R; 360,000; $500 
WCHF (*24) 1/29/53-Unknown 

Travelers Bcstg. Service Corp. (3) Initial Deci- 
sion 5/31/55 
NEW BRITAIN— 

► WKNB-TV (30) NBC; Boiling; 373,596; N; $500 
NEW HAVENf — 

► WNHC-TV (8) ABC, CBS; Katz; 948,702; N, LF, 

LS; $300 

WELI-TV (59) H-R; 6/24/53-Unknown 
NEW LONDON I — 

WNLC-TV (26) 12/31/52-Unknown 

NORWICHf— 

WCNE C63) 1/29/53-Unknown 
STAMFORDf — 

WSTF (27) 5/27/53-Unknown 
WATERBURY— 

► WATR-TV (53) ABC; Stuart; 217,554; $200 

DELAWARE 

WILMINGTON— 

► WPFH (12) NBC; Raymer; 2,051.000; N, LS, LF; 

$1,000 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 
WASHINGTON— 

► WMAL-TV (7) ABC; H-R; $1,200 

► WRC-TV (4) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 754,000; N; 

$1,250 

► WTOP-TV (9) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 704,300; N, 

LS; $1,500 

► WTTG (5) Raymer; 700,000; $600 
WOOK-TV (14) 2/24/54-Unknown 

FLORIDA 

DAYTONA BEACHf— 

► WESH-TV (2) Petry; $200 
FORT LAUDERDALE— 

► WITV (17) ABC; Forioe; 375,000 (also Miami); 

$500 

FORT MYERSf— 

► WINK-TV (11) CBS, ABC; McGillvra; 23,500; 

$150 

FORT PIERCEf — 

WTVI (19) 4/19/55-Unknown 
JACKSONVILLE — 

► WJHP-TV (36) ABC, NBC; Petry; 98,896; N; 

$200 

► WMBR-TV (4) CBS, ABC; CBS Spot Sis.; 367,- 

238; N; $700 

WQIK-TV (30) Stars National; 8/12/53-Unknown 
Jacksonville Bcstg. Corp. (12) Initial Decision 
4/4/55 

MIAMI— 

► WGBS-TV (23) NBC; Katz; 278,869; N; $500 

► WTHS-TV (*2) 

► WTVJ (4) CBS. ABC; Peters, Griffin, Wood- 

ward: 371.500; N, LL, LF, LS; $900 
*- WITV (17) See Fort Lauderdale 

WCKT (7) 1/19/56-7/29/56; NBC Spot Sis.; $950 
WMFL (33) 12/9/53-Unknown 

MIAMI BEACHf— 

WKAT Inc. (10) Initial Decision 3/30/55 
ORLANDO— 

► WDBO-TV (6) CBS, ABC, NBC; Hoag-Blair; 

164,000; N; $250 
WEAL-TV (18) 9/21/55-Unknown 
WORZ Inc. (9) Initial Decision 8/10/55 
PANAMA CITY— 

► WJDM (7) ABC, CBS, NBC; Hollingbery; 30,100; 

$150 

PENSACOLA— 

► WEAR-TV (3) ABC, CBS; Hollingbery; 152,000; 

N; $300 

WPFA-TV (15) See footnote 
ST. PETERSBURG— 

► WSUN-TV (38) ABC; Venard; 301,900; $400 

July 2, 1956 • Page 8? 



HOW TO READ THIS LISTING 

Each station or grantee is listed in the 
city where licensed. 

Triangle (►): station on air with reg- 
ular programming. Date of grant is 
shown for permittees, followed by 
planned starting date when known. 

Channel number is in parentheses, fol- 
lowed by national network affiliations 
and sales representatives, estimated sets 
in coverage area and station's highest 
one-time hourly rate. 

Set figures are provided by stations. 
Queries on set figures should be directed 
to stations. 

Asterisk (*): non-commercial outlet. 

Dagger (t): not interconnected. 

Data on station color equipment: N. 
equipped for network color; LS, local 
color slides; LF, local color film; LL, 
local live color. 



B-T TELESTATUS 



TAMPA— 

► WFLA-TV (8) NBC; Blair; 319,542; N, LF, LS; 

$600 

► WTVT (13) CBS; Avery-Knodel; 301,900; N, LF, 

LS; $600 
WEST PALM BEACH— 

► WEAT-TV (12) ABC, CBS; H-R; 90,000; $225 

► WJNO-TV (5) NBC, CBS; Venard; 295,306; $275 
WRIK-TV (21) See footnote 

GEORGIA 

ALBANYf — 

► WALB-TV (10) ABC, NBC; Venard; $45,000; $200 
ATLANTA— 

► WAGA-TV (5) CBS; Katz; 578,000; N, LS, LF; 

$1,000 

► WLWA (11) ABC; WLW Sales; 548,250; $800 

► WSB-TV (2) NBC; Petry; 556,460; N, LS, LF; 

fi,ooo 

WATL-TV (36) See footnote 
WETV (*30) 3/21/56-Unknown 
AUGUSTA— 

► WJBF (6) NBC, ABC; Hollingbery; 188,565; N; 

$300 

► WRDW-TV (12) CBS; Branham; 170,000; $300 
COLUMBUS— 

► WDAK-TV (28) NBC, ABC; Headley-Reed; 136,- 

959* N" $220 

► WRBL-TV (4) CBS, ABC; Hollingbery; 187,327; 

N; $300 
MACON— 

► WMAZ-TV (13) CBS, ABC; NBC (per program 

basis); Avery-Knodel; 117,778; N; $300 
WOKA (47) See footnote 
ROMEf— 

► WBOM-TV (9) McGillvra; 174,330; $150 
SAVANNAH— 

► WSAV-TV (3) NBC, ABC; Hoag-Blair; 150,501; 

N; $315 

► WTOC-TV (11) CBS, ABC; Avery-Knodel; 153,- 

142; N; $250 
THOMASVILLEf (TALLAHASSEE, FLA.)— 

► WCTV (6) CBS, NBC, ABC; Meeker; 80,564; 

$250 

IDAHO 

BOISEf— 

► KBOI-TV (2) CBS; Peters, Griffin, Woodward; 

65,025; $200 

► KLDO-TV (7) ABC, NBC; Hoag-Blair; 53,200; 

$250 

IDAHO FALLSf— 

► KID-TV (3) CBS, ABC, NBC; Gill-Perna; 54,- 

040; $200 
LEWISTONf— 

► KLEW-TV (3) CBS, ABC, NBC; Weed; 21,000; 

$150 (satellite of KIMA-TV Yakima, Wash.) 
POCATEUOf— 

KSEI-TV (6) 4/25/56-Unknown 

TWIN FALLSf— 

► KLXX-TV (11) CBS, ABC, NBC; Gill-Perna; 

21,00 0; $150 
KHTV (13) 11/9/55-Unknown 

ILLINOIS 

BLOOMINGTON— 

► WBLN (15) McGillvra; 113,242; $200 
CHAMPAIGN— 

► WCIA (3) CBS, NBC; Hollingbery; 312,028; N; 

$800 

CHICAGO— 

► WBBM-TV (2) CBS, CBS Spot Sis.; 2,323,200; 

N; $3,300 

► WBKB (7) ABC; Blair; 2,397,500; $2,400 

► WGN-TV (9) Petry; 2,325,000; $1,800 

► WNBQ (5) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 2,287,000; N, 

LL, L S, LF; $4,000 

► WTTW (*11) 

WHFC-TV (26) 1/8/53-Unknown 
WIND-TV (20) 3/9/53-Unknown 
WOPT (44) 2/10/54-Unknown 

DANVILLE— 

► WDAN-TV (24) ABC; Everett-McKinney; 50,- 

000; $150 
DECATUR— 

► WTVP (17) ABC, NBC, CBS; Boiling; 190,000; 

$300 
EVANSTONf— 

WTLE (32) 8/12/53-Unknown 

HARRISBURGf— 

► WSIL-TV (22) ABC; Walker; 30,000; $150 
PEORIA— 

► WEEK-TV (43) NBC; Headley-Reed; 244.420; N; 

$475 

► WTVH (19) CBS, ABC; Petry; 169,000; N; $450 
WIRL Tv Co. (8) Initial Decision 11/5/54 

QUINCY (HANNIBAL, MO.)— 

► WGEM-TV (10) ABC, NBC; Young; 150,000; N; 

£200 

► KHQA-TV (7) See Hannibal, Mo. 
ROCKFORD— 

► WREX-TV (13) CBS, ABC; H-R; 255,915; N; $400 

► WTVO (39) NBC; Headley-Reed; 116,000; $250 

ROCK ISLAND (DAVENPORT, MOLINE)— 

► WHBF-TV (4) CBS, ABC; Avery-Knodel; 285,- 

427; N; $800 

Page 84 • July 2, 1956 



SPRINGFIELD— 

► WICS (20) ABC, NBC; Young; 103,580; $250 
Sangamon Valley Tv Corp. (2) Initial Decision 

11/30/54 
URBANAf— 

► WILL-TV (*12) 

INDIANA 

ANDERSONf — 

WCBC-TV (61) 3/16/56-Unknown 
BLOOMINGTON— 

► WTTV (4) ABC, NBC; Meeker; 647,781 (also In- 

dianapolis); N; $800 
ELKHART (SOUTH BEND)— 

► WSJV (52) ABC; H-R; 215,814; $300 
EVANSVILLE— 

► WFIE (62) ABC, NBC; Venard; 126,088; $350 

► WEHT (50) See Henderson, Ky. 

WTVW (7) Hollingbery; $600; 12/21/55-Septem- 
ber , 
FORT WAYNE— 

► WKJG-TV (33) NBC; Raymer; 144,230; N; $450 

► WINT (15) See Waterloo 

WANE-TV (69) Boiling; 9/29/54-Unknown 
INDIANAPOLIS— 

► WFBM-TV (6) NBC; Katz; 660,000; N, LL, LF, 

LS; $960 

► WISH-TV (8) CBS; Boiling; 660,000; N; $1,200 

► WTTV (4) See Bloomington 

Mid- West Tv Corp. (13) Initial Decision 6/7/55 
LAFAYETTE— 

► WFAM-TV (59) CBS; Rambeau; 115,750; $200 
MUNCIE— 

► WLBC-TV (49) ABC, CBS, NBC; Holman, 

Walker; 107,250; N; $225 
PRINCETONf — 

WRAY-TV (52) See footnote 
SOUTH BEND (ELKHART)— 

► WNDU-TV (46) NBC; Petry; 186,000; N, LL, 

LS; $500 

► WSBT-TV (34) CBS; Raymer; 206,363; N; $400 
TERRE HAUTE— 

► WTHI-TV (10) CBS, ABC, NBC; Boiling; 180,- 

920; N; $400 
WATERLOO (FORT WAYNE)— 

► WINT (15) CBS, ABC; H-R; 139,625; N; $300 

IOWA 

AMES— 

► WOI-TV (5) ABC; Weed; 325,000; N; $500 
CEDAR RAPIDS— 

► KCRG-TV (9) ABC; Hoag-Blair; 325,977; N; 

$325 

► WMT-TV (2) CBS; Katz; 213,029; N; $500 
DAVENPORT (MOLINE, ROCK ISLAND)— 

► WOC-TV (6) NBC; Peters, Griffin, Woodward; 

317,902; N; $800 
DES MOINES— 

► KRNT-TV (8) CBS; Katz; N; $700 

► WHO-TV (13) NBC; Peters, Griffin, Woodward; 

284,500; N, LF, LS; $700 
KGTV (17) See footnote 
FORT DODGE— 

► KQTV (21) NBC; Pearson; 42,870; $150 
MASON CITY— 

► KGLO-TV (3) CBS; Weed; 135,932; $200 
OTTUMWA— 

► KTVO (3) (See Kirkville, Mo.) 
SIOUX CITY— 

► KTP7 (4) NBC; Hollingbery; 187,743; N; $350 

► KVTV (9) CBS, ABC; Katz; 179,521; N; $425 
WATERLOO— 

► KWWL-TV (7) NBC; Avery-Knodel; 324,866; 

$500 

KANSAS 

ENSIGN— 

KTVC (6) 1/25/56-Unknown 
GOODLANDf — 

KWGB-TV (10) 5/11/55-Unknown 

GREAT BEND— 

► KCKT (2) NBC; Boiling; 176,097; $250 
HUTCHINSON (WICHITA)— 

► KTVH (12) CBS; H-R; 234,125; N; $500 

► KAKE-TV (10) See Wichita 
KARD-TV (3) See Wichita 

MANHATTAN-)-— 

KS AC-TV (*8) 7/24/53-Unknown 

PITTSBURG— 

► KOAM-TV (7) NBC, ABC; Katz; 161,851; $300 
TOPEKA— 

► WIBW-TV (13) CBS, ABC; Capper; 529,346; N; 

$550 

WICHITA (HUTCHINSON)— 

► KAKE-TV (10) ABC; Katz; 260,000; N; $425 

► KARD-TV (3) NBC; Petry; 265,430; N, LF, LS; 

$550 

► KTVH (12) See Hutchinson 
KEDD (16) See footnote 



New TV Stations 

THE following tv stations started regular 
programming within the past month: 

WESH-TV Daytona Beach, Fla. (ch. 
2); WTRI Albany, N. Y. (ch. 35); 
WISC-TV Madison, Wis. (ch. 3); WTWV 
Tupelo, Miss. (ch. 9), and CFCL-TV 
Timmins, Ont. (ch. 6). 



KENTUCKY 

ASHLAND t — 

WPTV (59) Petry; 8/14/52-Unknown 
HENDERSON (EVANSVILLE, IND.) — 

► WEHT (50) CBS; Meeker; 99,648; N; $300 
LEXINGTONf — 

► WLEX-TV (18) NBC, ABC; Boiling; $190 

WLAP-TV (27) 12/3/53-Unknown 
LOUISVILLE— 

► WAVE-TV (3) NBC, ABC; NBC Spot Sis.; 506,- 

966; N; $1,025 

► WHAS-TV (11) CBS; Harrington, Righter & 

Parsons (last reported set count in July 1952 
was 205,544); N; $1,000 
WQXL-TV (41) Forjoe; 1/15/53-Unknown 
WKLO-TV (21) See footnote 
NEWPORTf — 

WNOP-TV (74) 12/24/53-Unknown 
OWENSBORO— 

WKYT (14) 3/14/56-Unknown 
PADUCAHf — 

Columbia Amusement Co. (6) Initial Decision 
4/11/55 

LOUISIANA 

ALEXANDRIA— 

► KALB-TV (5) NBC, ABC, CBS; Weed; 126,400; 

$250 

BATON ROUGE— 

► WAFB-TV (28) CBS, ABC; Young; 104,000; $250 

► WBRZ (2) NBC, ABC; Hollingbery; 160,149; N; 

$300 
LAFAYETTE— 

► KLFY-TV (10) CBS; Venard; 72,000; $200 
LAKE CHARLES 

► KPLC-TV (7) NBC, ABC; Weed; 100,537; $250 

► KTAG (25) CBS; Young; 62,640; $150 
MONROE— 

► KNOE-TV (8) CBS, ABC, NBC; H-R; 298,200; 

N; $400 

KLSE (*13) 12/14/55-Unknown 
NEW ORLEANS— 

► WDSU-TV (6) ABC, CBS, NBC; Blair; 392,236; 

N, LF, LL; $900 

► WJMR-TV (20) CBS, ABC; Boiling; 157,782; N; 

$300 

WCKG (26) Gill-Perna; 4/2/53-Unknown 

WYES (*8) 2/17/56-Unknown 

Times-Picayune Pub. Co. (4) Initial Decision 

7/7/55 

SHREVEPORT— 

► KSLA-TV (12) ABC, CBS; Raymer; N; 166,000; 

$400 

► KTBS-TV (3) NBC, ABC; Petry; 249,695; N; 

$400 

MAINE 

BANGOR— 

► WABI-TV (5) ABC, NBC; Hollingbery; 98,000; 

N; $150 

► WTWO (2) CBS; Venard; $250 
LEWISTON— 

WLAM-TV (17) See footnote 
POLAND SPRING— 

► WMTW (8) CBS, ABC; Harrington, Righter & 

Parsons; 250,000; $400 
PORTLAND— 

► WCSH-TV (6) NBC; Weed; 190,200; N; $400 

► WGAN-TV (13) CBS; Avery-Knodel; 185,000; 

N; $400 
PRESOUE ISLE— 

WAGM-TV (8) 3/27/56-Unknown 
MARYLAND 

BALTIMORE — 

► WAAM (13) ABC; Harrington, Righter & Par- 

sons; 683,045; $1,100 

► WBAL-TV (11) NBC; Petry; 704,063; N, LL, LS. 

LF; $1,250 

► WMAR-TV (2) CBS; Katz; 678,977; N, LF, LS; 

$1 250 

WITH-TV (72) Forjoe; 12/18/52-Unknown 
WTLF (18) 12/9/53-Unknown 
SALISBURYf— 

► WBOC-TV (16) ABC, CBS; Headley-Reed; 55,- 

155; $200 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BOSTON— 

► WBZ-TV (4) NBC; Peters, Griffin, Woodward; 

1,420,106; N, LS, LF; $2,250 

► WGBH-TV (*2) N, LL, LF, LS 

► WNAC-TV (7) CBS, ABC; H-R; 1,420,106; N; 

$2,600 

► WMUR-TV (9) (See Manchester, N. H.) 
WXEL (38) 10/12/55-Unknown 
WJDW (44) 3/12/53-Unknown 

Greater Boston Tv Corp. (5) Initial Decision 
1/4/56 
BROCKTONf — 

WHEF-TV (62) 7/30/53-Unknown 
CAMBRIDGE (BOSTON)— 

WTAO-TV (56) See footnote 
PITTSFiELDf — 

WMGT (19) ABC; Walker; $250 (Temporarily 
off air because of wind damage; plans return 
in September.) 
SPRINGFIELD — 

► WHYN-TV (55) CBS; Branham; 230.000; N; $400 

► WWLP (22) NBC, ABC; Hollingbery; 230,000; N. 

LS; $500 
WORCESTER— 

WWOR-TV (14) See footnote 
WAAB-TV (20) Forjoe; 8/12/53-Unknown 

MICHIGAN 

ANN ARBOR— 

► WPAG-TV (20) Everett-McKinney; 31,000; $150 
WUOM-TV (*26) 11/4/53-Unknown 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



BAY CITY (MIDLAND, SAGINAW)— 

► WNEM-TV (5) NBC, ABC; Headley-Reed; 312,- 

555; N; $575 
CADILLAC— 

► WWTV (13) CBS, ABC; Weed; 355,196; $300 
DETROIT— 

► WJBK-TV (2) CBS; Katz; 1,590,400; N; $2,200 

► WTVS (*56) 

► WWJ-TV (4) NBC; Peters, Griffin, Woodward; 

1,610,000; N, LF, LS; $2,000 

► WXYZ-TV (7) ABC; Blair; 1,600,000: N; $1,800 

► CKLW-TV (9) CBC; Young; 1,568,000; $1,100 

(See Windsor, Ont.) 
WBID-TV (50) 11/19/53-Unknown 
EAST LANSINGf— 

► WKAR-TV (*60) 
FLINTf — 

WJRT (12) CBS; Harrington, Righter & Par- 
sons; 5/12/54-October 
GRAND RAPIDS— 

► WOOD-TV (8) NBC, ABC; Katz; 606,510; N; 

$1,175 

WMCM (23) 9/2/54-Unknown 
IRONWOOD— 

WJMS-TV (12) 11/30/55-Unknown 
KALAMAZOO— 

► WKZO-TV (3) CBS, ABC, NBC; Avery-Knodel; 

620,500; N; $1,000 
LANSTG— 

► WJIM-TV (6) NBC, CBS, ABC; Petry; 445,000; 

N; $800 

► WTOM-TV (54) ABC; McGillvra; 60,850; $200 
MARQUETTEf— 

► WDMJ-TV (6) Weed 

SAGI AW (BAY CITY, MIDLAND) 

► WKNX-TV (57) CBS, ABC; Gill-Perna; 152,000; 

N; $375 
TRAVERSE CITY— 

► WPBN-TV (7) NBC; Holman; 56,920; $144 

MINNESOTA 

AUSTIN — 

► KMMT (6) ABC; Avery-Knodel; 115,126; $200 
DULUTH (SUPERIOR, WIS.)— 

► KDAL-TV (3) CBS, ABC; Avery-Knodel; 

127,500; $400 

► WDSM-TV (6) See Superior, Wis. 
WFTV (38) See footnote 

MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL— 

► KEYD-TV (9) Branham; 630,000; $450 

► KSTP-TV (5) NBC; Petry; 615,000; N, LS, LF; 

$1,450 

► WCCO-TV (4) CBS; Peters, Griffin, Woodward; 

N, LL; $1,475 

► WTCN-TV (11) ABC; Katz; 650,000; $800 
ROCKF^;?— 

► KROC-TV (10) NBC, ABC; Meeker; 120,000; N; 

$250 

MISSISSIPPI 

BILOXlf— 

WVMI (13) Initial Decision 6/5/56 
COLUWUSf— 

WCBI-TV (4) CBS, NBC; McGillvra; $150 
7/28/54-7/13/56 
HATTIESBURGf— 

► WDAM-TV (9) NBC, ABC; Pearson; $175 
JACKOT';— 

► WJTV (12) CBS, ABC; Katz; 149,000; $360 

► WLBT (3) NBC; Hollingbery; 175,000; N; $360 
MERI HAW— 

► WTOK-TV (11) ABC, CBS, NBC; Headley- 

Reed; 79,087; $250 
WCOC-TV (30) See footnote 
TUPELOf— 
►•WTWV (9) $150 

MISSOURI 

CAPE GIRARDEAU— 

► KFVS-TV (12) CBS, NBC, ABC; Headlev- 

Reed; 155,400; N; $400 
COLUMBIA — 

► KOMU-TV (8) NBC, ABC; H-R; 98,777; $250 
HA'« I3AL (QUINCY, ILL.) 

► KHQA-TV (7) CBS; Weed; 149,060; N; $250 

► WGEM-TV (10) See Quincy. 111. 
JEFFERSON CITY— 

► KRCG (13) CBS; Hoag-Blair; 87,815; $250 
JOPIJN— 

► KSWM-TV (12) CBS; Venard; 113,500; N; $225 
KANSAS CITY— 

► KCMO-TV (5) CBS; Katz; 571,232; N; $1,200 

► KMBC-TV (9) ABC; Peters. Griffin, Woodward; 

571,232; N, LS, LF, LL; $540 (naif-hour) 

► WDAF-TV (4) NBC; Harrington, Righter & 

Parsons; 571,232; N, LS, LF, $960 
KIRKSVILLE— 

► KTVO (3) CBS, NBC; Boiling; 187,765; N; $300 
ST. JOSEPH— 

► KFEQ-TV (2) CBS; Headley-Reed; 161,079; $350 
ST. LOUIS— 

► KETC (*9) 

► KSD-TV (5) ABC. CBS. NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 

921,618; N, LS, LF; $1,200 

► KTVI (36) ABC, CBS; Weed; 422,422; $400 

► KWK-TV (4) CBS, ABC; Katz; N; $1,500 
SEDAUAf— 

► KDRO-TV (6) Pearson; 57,000; $200 
SPRINGFIELD— 

► KTTS-TV (10) CBS; Weed; 111,146; N; $250 

► KYTV (3) NBC; Hollingbery; 102,519; N; $275 

MONTANA 

BILLINGS I — 

► KOOK-TV (2) CBS, ABC, NBC; Headley-Reed; 

28,500; $150 

KGHL-TV (8) 11/23/55-Unknown 



BUTTEf— 

► KXLF-TV (6) ABC; No estimate given; $50 
GREAT FALLSf— 

► KFBB-TV (5) CBS, ABC, NBC; Hoag-Blair; 

27,500; $150 
MISSOULAf— 

► KGVO-TV (13) CBS, ABC; Gill-Perna; 24,870; 

$150 

NEBRASKA 

HASTINGS— 

► KHAS-TV (5) NBC; Weed; 71,992; N; $200 
HAYES CENTERf— 

► KHPL-TV (6) (Satellite of KHOL-TV Hol- 

drege) 

KEARNEY (HOLDREDGE)— 

► KHOL-TV (13) CBS, ABC; Meeker; 92,726; N; 

$300 
LINCOLN— 

► KOLN-TV (10) ABC, CBS; Avery-Knodel; 

156,174; $400 

► KUON-TV (*12) 
OMAHA — 

► KMTV (3) NBC, ABC; Petry; 370,021; N, LL, 

LS, LF; $900 

► WOW-TV (6) CBS; Blair; 367,353; N; $850 
KETV (7) 4/27/56-Unknown 

SCOTTSBLUFFf — 

► KSTF (10) (Satellite of KFBC-TV Cheyenne, 

Wyo.) 

NEVADA 
HENDERSON (LAS VEGAS)— 

► KLRJ-TV (2) NBC, ABC; Pearson; 30,000; N; 

$250 
LAS VEGAS— 

► KLAS-TV (8) CBS; Weed; 29,003; $250 

► KLRJ-TV (2) See Henderson 

► KSHO-TV (13) Forjoe; 27,900; $200 
RENO— 

► KZTV (8) CBS, ABC, NBC; Pearson; 25,000; 

$300 

KAKJ (4) 4/19/55-Unknown 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

KEE^Ff— 

WKNE-TV (45) 4/22/53-Unknown 
MANCHESTER (BOSTON)— 

► WMUR-TV (9) ABC, CBS; Forjoe; 1.127,959; 

$600 

MT. WASHINGTON; — 

► WMTW (8) See Poland Spring, Me. 

NEW JERSEY 

ASBURY PARKf— 

WRTV (58) See footnote 
ATLANTIC CITY— 

WOCN (52) 1/8/53-Unknown 

WFPG-TV (46) See footnote 
CAMDENf — 

WKDN-TV (17) 1/28/54-Unknown 
NEWARK (MEW YORK CITY)— 

► WATV (13) Petry; 4,730,000; $2,000 
NEW BRUNSWICKf— 

WTLV (*19) 12/4/52-Unknown 

NEW MEXICO 

ALBUQUERQUE— 

► KGGM-TV (13) CBS; Weed: 74.183: $300 

► KOAT-TV (7) ABC: Hollingbery; 62.000; $200 

► KOB-TV (4) NBC; Branham; 74,942; $300 

CARLSBAD— 

KAVE-TV (6) Branham; $150; 6/22/55-August 
CLOVIS— 

KICA-TV (12) 2/23/56-Unknown 
ROSWELL— 

► KSW.S-TV (8) NBC, ABC, CBS; Meeker; 34.687: 

$250 
SANTA FE— 

KVIT (2) 1/25/56-Unknown 

NEW YORK 

ALBANY (SCHENECTADY, TROY)— 

► WCDA (41) CBS; Harrington, Righter & Par- 

sons; 175,000; N; $400 

► WTRI (35) ABC; Venard; 175,000; $400 
WPTR-TV (23) 6/10/53-Unknown 
WTVZ (*17) 7/24/52-Unknown 

BING HAMPTON — 

► WNBF-TV (12) CBS, ABC, NBC; Blair; N; 

402,170; $800 
WINR-TV (40) 9/29/54-Unknown 
WQTV (*46) 8/14/52-Unknown 

BUFFALO — 

► WBEN-TV (4) CBS; Harrington, Righter & 

Parsons; 535,347 (plus 658,139 Canadian cover- 
age); N, LS, LF, LL; $800 

► WBUF-TV (17) NBC; H-R; 152,500; $500 

► WGR-TV (2) ABC, NBC, CBS; Peters, Griffin, 

Woodward; 539,134 (plus 566,565 Canadian 
coverage); N; $950 
WNYT-TV (59) 11/23/55-Unknown 
WTVF (*23) 7/24/52-Unknown 
Great Lakes Tv Inc. (7) Initial Decision 1/31/56 

CARTHAGE (WATERTOWN)— 

► WCNY-TV (7) CBS, ABC; Weed; 84,619 (plus 

50,100 Canadian coverage); $200 
WSYE-TV (18) 4/4/58-July 

ELMIRAf — 

► WTVE (24) ABC, NBC; Forjoe; 35,000; $150 
WSYE-TV (18) 4/4/56- July 

HAGAMAN— 

► WCDB (29) (satellite WCDA Albany, N. Y.) 



ITHACAf— 

WHCU-TV (20) CBS; 1/8/53-Unknown 
WTET (*14) 1/8/53-Unknown 
LAKE PLACIDf (PLATTSBURG)— 

► WPTZ (5) NBC, ABC; Hoag-Blair; 142,000 (plus 

350,000 Canadian coverage); $250 
NEW YORK— 

► WABC-TV (7) ABC; Blair; 4,730,000; $3,750 

► WABD (5) Raymer; 4,730,000; N, LL, LF, LS 

$2 200 

► WCBS-TV (2) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 4,730,000, N, 

LS, LF, LL; $8,000 

► WOR-TV (9) WOR-TV Sis.; 4,730.000: $1,500 

► WPIX (11) Peters, Griffin, Woodward; 4,730,000; 

$1,500 

► WRCA-TV (4) NBC: NBC Spot Sis; 4,730,000; 

N, LS, LF, LL; $9,200 

► WATV (13) See Newark. N. J. 
WGTV (*25) 8/14/52-Unknown 
WNYC-TV (31) 5/12/54-Unknown 

POUGHKEEPSIE— 

► WKNY-TV (66) ABC, CBS, NBC; Meeker; 40,- 

600; $100 

ROCHESTER— 

► WHAM-TV (5) NBC, ABC; Hollingbery; 310,000 

(plus 50,000 Canadian coverage); N; $800 

► WHEC-TV (10) CBS, ABC; Everett-McKinney; 

327.000: N; $700 

► WVET-TV (10) CBS, ABC; Boiling; 327,000 (in- 

cluding 31,500 Canadian coverage); N; $700 
WCBF-TV (15) 5/10/53-Unknown 
WROH (*21) 7/24/52-Unknown 

SCHENECTADY (ALBANY, TROY)— 

► WRGB (6) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 490,630; N; 

$1,100 

SYRACUSE— 

► WHEN (8) CBS, ABC; Katz; 371,330; N; $700 

► WSYR-TV (3) NBC: Harrington, Righter & 

Parsons: 457.770; N, LS, LF; $800 
WHTV (*43) 9/18/52-Unknown 

UTICA— 

► WKTV (13) NBC, ABC, CBS; Cooke; 207,500; 

N; $550 

NORTH CAROLINA 

ASHEVILLE — 

► WISE-TV (62) CBS. NBC; Boiling; 40,000; $150 

► WLOS-TV (13) ABC, CBS; Venard; 375,000; $400 

CHAPEL HILLf — 

► WUNC-TV (*4) 
CHARLOTTE — 

► WBTV (3) CBS. ABC. NBC: CBS Spot Sis.; 

528.210; N, LL. LS. LF; $1,000 
WQMC (36) See footnote 

Piedmont Electronics & Fixture Corp. (9) Initial 

Decision 8/2/55 

DURHAM— 

► WTVD (11) NBC, ABC; Petry; 289,465: N; $550 
FAYETTEVILLEf — 

► WFLB-TV (18) CBS. NBC; Young; 39,340; $150 

G ASTON lAf— 

WTVX (48) 4/7/54-Unknown 

GREENSBORO— 

► WFMY-TV (2) CBS, ABC; Harrington, Righter 
& Parsons; 422,691; N, LF, LS; $650 

GREENVILLE— 

► WNCT (9) CBS. ABC; Pearson; 164,980; $350 

NEW BERNf — 

WNBE-TV (13) 2/9/55-Unknown 

RALEIGH— 

► WNAO-TV (28) CBS, ABC; Avery-Knodel; 140,- 

250; N; $325 
Capitol Bctsg. Co. (5) Initial Decision 4/19/55 

WASHINGTON— 

► WITN (7) NBC; Headley-Reed; 150.000; N; $325 
WILMINGTON— 

► WMFD-TV (6) NBC. ABC, CBS; Weed; 94,600; 

$250 

WTHT (3) 2/17/54-Unknown 
WINSTON-SALEM— 

► WSJS-TV (12) NBC; Headley-Reed; 520,594; N; 

$550 

► WTOB-TV (26) ABC; Venard; 123,008; $200 

NORTH DAKOTA 

BISMARCK— 

► KBMB-TV (12) CBS: Weed; 25,800; N; $150 

► KFYR-TV (5) NBC, ABC, CBS; Hoag-Blair; 

30,750; $200 

DICKINSONf— 

KDIX-TV (2) 5/9/56-Unknown 

FARGOf— „ 

► WDAY-TV (6) NBC. ABC; Peters, Griffin, 

Woodward; 90,240; $400 

GRAND FORKS— ,„ m 

► KNOX-TV (10) NBC; Rambeau; 37,000; N; $200 

MINOT— „ 

► KCJB-TV (13) CBS, NBC, ABC; Weed; 29,000; 

$200 

KMOT (10) 10/5/55-Unknown 
VALLEY CITY— 

► KXJB-TV (4) CBS; Weed; 124,000; N, LF, LS; 

$400 

OHIO 

AKRON— 

► WAKR-TV (49) ABC; Weed; 174,066; $300 

ASHTABULAf — 

WICA-TV (15) See footnote 

CANTONf — 

WTLC (29) 3/22/56-Unknown 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 85 




COMPARATIVE NETWORK SHOWSHEET 



ABC 



CBS 



NBC 



ABC 



MONDAY 



CBS 



NBC 



ABC 



TUESDAY 



CBS 



! 



NBC 



ABC CBS NBC 



Valiant Lady 



Wesson Oil 
V aliant Lady 



GenT Mills 

Valiant Lady 



12:15 



12:30 



12:45 



1:00 



1:15 



1 :30 



774T 



2:00 



2:15 



2:30 



2:45 



3:00 



3:15 



3:30 



3:45 
4:00 



4:15 



4:30 



4:45 



5:00 



5:15 



5:30 



5:45 



6:00 



6:15 



6:30 



6:45 



7:00 



7:15 



7:30 



7:45 



8:00 



8:15 



8:30 



8:45 



9:00 



9:15 



9:30 



9:45 



10:00 



10:15 



10:30 



10:45 



College 
Press 
Conference 
L 



Under the 
Sun 
L 



Skippy 
Peanut 
Butter 
You Asked 
For It 
F 



Pearson 
Pharmacal 
J. H. Breck 

P&G 
Mobile Hms. 
Famous- 
Film 
Festival 
( Partici- 
pating) 
F 



Pharmaceu- 
ticals 
Ted Mack 
Amateur 
Hour 
L 



Focus 
F 



Lei's Take 
A Trip 



Kellogg 
Wild Bill 
] lickok 
F 



Adventure 
(Sust.) 



Face the 
Nation 
(Sust.) 
(St. 7/15) 
'Bandwagon 
56" (Sus'.) 



The CBS 
Sunday 

News 
(Sust.) 



Bell 

Telephone 

System 
Telephone 
Time 



Prudential 
You Axe 
There L 



Campbell 

Soup 
(Alt. wks.) 

Kellogg 
Lassie F 



Am. Tobacco 
Private 
Secretary 
(Weekly) 



Mercury 
Div. of 
The Ford 
Motor Co. 

The 
Ed Sullivan 
Show 
L 



Gen. Fleet. 
G E 
Theatre 
F 



Bristol- 
Myers 
Hitchcock 
Presents 
F 



P. Lorillard 
(Alt. wks.) 

Revlon 
The $64,000 
Challenge 



Helene 
Curtis 

(Alt. wks.) 

Remington 
What's 

My Line L 



Beechnut 
Dr. Spock 
L 



Youth 
Wants 
To Know 
L 



Frontiers 
of Faith 
L 



American 
Forum 
L 



Mutual 
of Omaha 
Zoo Parade 
L 



Outlook 
L$F 



Johns Man- 

ville 
Pan Amer. 
Meet the 
Press 
L 



Gen. Foods 
Hoy Rogers 
F 



General 
Foods 
Topper 
F 



Reynolds 
Metals 
Frontier 
F 



AVCO 
Jergens 
Brown & 
Williamson 
Steve Allen 

Show L 
7:30-9 p.m. 
(1 wk. of 4) 

Sunday 
Spectaculars 



Goodyear 
Corp. 

(alt. with) 
Alcoa 
TV 
Playhouse 
L 



Kleenex 

P&G 
Loretta 
Young 
F 



White Owl 
Cigars' 
National 
Bowling 
Champions 
L 



Afternoon 
Film 
Festival 
F&L 
Participati ng 

(see footnote) 



Mickey 
Mouse 
Club 
(see 
footnote) 
F 



Co-op 
Jack Drees L 
Sports Show 



Polaroid 
Corp. 
Daly-News 



Ralston- 
Purina 
Bold Journev 
F 



Dotty Mack 
Show 
L 



Firestone 
Voice of 
Firestone 
L 



Film 
Fair 
Participating 
F&L 



Amer. Home 

Products 
Love of Life 



P&G 
Search for 
Tomorrow 



P&G Guid- 
ing Light 
L 



1:00 CBS 

News 
1:10 Standup 
4 Be Counted 
S 



P&G 
As The 
World 
Turns 



The Johnny 
Carson Shou 
S 



Art 
Linkletter's 
House Party 

(See 
Footnote) 



Colgate 
Big Payoir 

MWF 
Sus. Tu. Th 



Bob Crosby 
(See Foot- 
notes) 



P&G 
The Brighter 
Day 



Am. Home 
Pr. Secret 
Storm 



P&G 
The Edge 
of Night 



Whitehall 
News 
L 



Whitehall 

News 
L 



Johnson & 

Johnson 
(Alt. wks.) 
Wildroot 
Rob. Hood F 



Carnation 
(Alt. wks.) 
B. F. G'rich 
Burns & 
Allen F 



Lvr.-Lptn. 

(Alt. wks.) 
Toni Co. 
Talent 
Scouts 



P&G 
(Alt. wks.) 
Gen. Foods 
Chas. Farrell 
Show 



General 
Foods 
Vic Damone 
Show 



Westing- 
house 
Studio One 
Summer 
Theatre 
L 



It Could Be 
You 
L 



Colgate- 
Palmolive 

Feather 
Your Nest 
L 



Tennessee 
Ernie Ford 
Show 
L 



NBC 
Matinee 
Theatre 
( Partici- 
pating) 
Color L 



Queen 
For A 

Participating 
L 



Modern 
Romances 

L 



I Married 
Joan 
F 



G. MacRae 
Lever Bros. 
L 



Camel 
Caravan 
L 



Ford Motor 
Co., RCA 
Producers' 
Showcase 
(8-9:30 
1 wk. of 4) 
Rem. Rand 
Amer. 
Chicle 
Helene Crts. 
Ernie Kovac 
Show L 



GE & G&P 
Medic 
F 



Johnson 

Wax 
alt. with 
Schick 

Robert 
Montgomery 
Presents 
L 



Afternoon 
Film 
Festival 
F&L 
Participating 

(see footnote) 



Mickey 
Mouse 
Club 
(see 
footnote) 
F 



Co-op 
Jack Drees L 
Sports Show 



Daly-News 



L&M 
Gen. Elec. 
Monsanto 
W'arner 

Bros. 
Presents 
F 



Gen. Mills 
Parker Pen 

(Alt. wks.) 
Wyatt Earp 
F 



Gen. Electric 
G.E. Summer 
Originals 
F 



duPont 
Cavalcade 
Theatre 
F 



The Big 
Picture 



Amer. Home 

Products 
Love of Life 



P&G 
Search for 
Tomorrow 



P&G Guid- 
ing Light 
L 



1 :00 CBS 
News 
1:10 Standup 
# Be Counted 

s 



P&G 
As The 
World 
Turns 



The Johnny 
Carson Show 
S 

(Alt. Tues.) 
Best Foods 



Art 
Linkletter's 
House Party 

(See 
Footnote) 



Colgate 
Big Payoff 

MWF 
Sus. Tu, Th 



Bob Crosby 
(See Foot- 
notes) 



P&G 
The Brighter 
Day 



Am. Home 
Pr. Secret 
Storm 



P&G 
The Edge 
of Night 



Pall Mall 

News 
L 



Pall Mall 

News 
I. 



Whitehall 
(Alt. wks.) 
Lanolin Plus 
Name That 
Tune 



R.J. Reynolds 
(Alt. wks.) 
Amana 
Phil 
Silvers F 



Maytag Co. 
(Alt. wks.) 

Sheaffer 
Navy Log 
F 

Pharmaceu. 
Lombardo's 
Jubilee 
Eff. 6/19 
Joe. and 
Mabel 

S.C. Johnson 
(Alt. wks.) 
Pet Milk 
Spotlight 
Theatre L 



Revlon 
The $64,000 
Question 
L 



G.M. 
(Alt. wks.) 
Liggett & M. 
Frigidaire 
Do You 
Trust Your 



Tennessee 
Ernie Ford 
L 



Colgate- 
Palmolive 

Feather 
Your Nest 
L 



NBC 
Matinee 
Theatre 
(Partici- 
pating) 
Color L 



Queen 
For A 

Participating 
L 



Modern 
Romances 
L 



I Married 
Joan 
F 



7/17 Snook y 
Lanson Show 
L 



News 
Caravan L 



Dear 
Phoebe 
F 



lazel Bishop 
This Is Show 
Business 
L 



P&G 
Sneak 
Preview 
F 



Armstrong 

Cork 
Armstrong 
Circle Th'tre 

Kaiser 
Aluminum 
Hour 
L 



Lever Bros. 

A.C. 
Spark Plug 
Big Town 
F 



Afternoon 
Film 
Festival 
F&L 
Participating 

(see footnote) 



Mickey 
Mouse 
Club 
(see 
footnote) 
F 



Co-op 
Jack Drees L 
Sports Show 



Miles Labs 
Daly-News 



American 

Motors 
American 
Dairy 
Derby Floods 
Disneyland 
F 



Am. Tobacco 
Pearson 
Pharm. 
Dunninger 
L 



Eastman 
Kodak 
Screen 
Directors 
Playhouse 



Eddy 
Arnold 
Show 
L 



Pabst 
Brewing Co. 
Mennen Co. 
Wednesday 
Night Fights 
L 



The Johnny 
Carson Show 

S 

Simoniz 
July 4, 11, 18 



Amer. Home 

Products 
Love of Life 



P&G 
Search for 
Tomorrow 



P&G Guid- 
ing Light 
L 



1 :00 CBS 

News 
10 Standup 
(f Be Counted 

S 



P&G 
As The 
World 
Turns 



Art 
Linkletter's 
1 louse Party 

(See 
Footnote) 



Colgate 
Big Payoff 

MWF 
Sus. Tu, Th 



Bob Crosby 
(See Foot- 
notes) 



~rm — 

The Brighter 
Day 

Am. Home 
Pr. Secret 
Storm 



P&G 
The Edge 
of Night 



Whitehall 
News 
L 



Whitehall 

News 
L 



CBS 
Cartoon 
Theater 



Toni Co. 
(8-8:30) 
(Alt. wks.) 
Bristol Myers 
Godfrey and 
His F'riends 
Kellogg 
(8:30-9) 
(Alt. wks.) 
Pillsbury 



Colgate 
The 
Millionaire 
F 



B. J. 
Reynolds 
I've Got 
A Secret 
L 



General 
Electric 
20th Cntry. 
Fox Hour 
(Alt. wks.) 
U. S. Steel 

V. S. 
Steel Hour 
F 



1 



THURSDAY 



ABC 



CBS 



NBC 



ABC 



FRIDAY 



CBS 



SATURDAY 



NBC 



ABC 



CBS 



NBC 



Afternoon 
Kilm 
Festival 
F&L 
Participating 

(see footnote) 



Miekey 
Mouse 
Club 
(see 
footnote) 

F 



Co-op 
Jack Drees I 
Sports Show 



Daly-News 



Am. Dairy 
Gen. Mills 
l,oue 
Hanger 
F 



77/e Hoar 
Glass 
F 



lirillo Star 
Tonight 
L 



Greatest 
Sports 
Thrills 
F 



Compass 
F 



Toni 
Valiant Lad 



Amer. Home 

Products 
Love of Life 



P&G 
Search for 
Tomorrow 



P&G Guid 
ing Light 
L 



J :00 CBS 
News 
1:10 Standui 
$ Br Countet 

s 



P&G 
As The 
World 
Turns 



The Johnny 
Carson Show 

S 



Art 

Linkletter's 
1 louse Party 

(See 
Footnote) 



Colgate 
Pig Payolf 

JV1WF 
Sus. Tu, Th 



Bob Oroshy 
(See Foot- 
notes) 



P&G 
The Brightei 
Day 



Am. Dome 
IV. Secret 
Storm 



P&C, 
The Edge 
of Night 



Tennessee 
Ernie Ford 
L 



Colgate 
Palmolive 

Feather 
Your Nest 
L 



NBC 
Matinee 
Theatre 
(Partici- 
pating) 
Color L 



Oueen 
For A 
Day 
Participati n 
L 



Modern 
Romances 
L 



I Married 
Joan 
F 



News 
L 



News 
L 



( hiaker 
Oats 
Sgt. Preston 
of the Yukon 
F 



EC J. 

Reynolds 

Bob 
Ctimmings 
Show F 



Chrysler 
Motors 

Climax — 
Shower 

of Stars 
L 



7/19 Snook y 
Lanson Show 
L 



( iamel 
News 
Caravan L 



DeSoto- 
Plymouth 

Best of 
Groucho 
F 



Chesterfield 
Dragnet 
F 



Singer Sew'f 
(Alt. wks.) 

Brstl. Myrs 
Four Star 
Playhouse F 



Toni Co. 

(Alt. wks.) 
Hazel Bishop 

The Arthur 
Murray Prty 



Quiz 
Kids 

(Sust.) 



Borden Co. 
The People's 
Choice 
F 



Ford 
Theatre 
F 



Lever 
Bros. 
Lux 
Video 
Theatre 
L 



Afternoon 
Film 
Festival 
F&L 
Participating 

(sec footnote) 



Mickey 
Mouse 

Club 

(see 
footnote) 
F 



lack Drees I 
Sports Show 



Daly-News 



National 
Biscuit 
Bin 
Tin Tin 
F 



Combat 
Sergeant 



tien. Mills 
Valiant Lady 



Amer. Home 

Products 
Love of Life 



P&G 
Search for 
Tomorrow 



P&G Guid- 
ing Light 
L 



1 :00 CBS 
News 
1:10 Slandup 
4 Be Counted 

S 



P&G 
As The 
World 
Turns 



The Johnny 
Carson Show 

s 



Art 
Linkletter's 
House Party 

(See 
Footnote) 



Colgate 
Big Payoff 

MVVF 
Sus. Tu, Th 



Bob Crosby 
(See Foot- 
notes) 



P&C 
The Brighter 
Day 



Tennessee 
Ernie Ford 
L 



Colgate- 
Palmolive 

Feather 
Your Nest 
L 



Am. I lome 
Pr. Seercl 
Storm 



P&G 
The Edge 
of Night 



Whitehall 
News 
L 



Whitehall 

News 
L 



Colgate- 
Palmolive do 
My Friend 
Flicka 



General 
Foods 
Hollywood 
Summer Th'r 
L 



Chevrolet 
Crossroads 
F 



1 lelene Curti 
Wine Corp. 
Dollar A 
Second 
L 



Sterling 

Drug 
The Vise 
F 



Pabst 
Brewing 
It's Polka 
Time 
L 



General 
Foods 
Our 
Miss 
Brooks 



R.J.Reynolds 

(Alt. wks.) 
C'gate P'olive 
The 
Crusader 
F 



Schlitz 
Brewing 
Playhouse 
of Stars 
F 



Brown & 
Williamson 
(Alt. wks.) 
P&G 
Undercurrent 
F 



Amer. Oil 
Hamm 
Elgin 
Person to 
Person L 



NBC 
Matinee 
Theatre 
(Partici- 
pating) 
Color L 



Queen 
For A 
Day 
Participate 
L 



noderh 
ftrimanrrs 

L 



I Married 
Joan 

F 



Jnye P. 
Morgan I. 



Miles 
News 
Caravan L 



P. Lorillard 

& Poni Co. 

Truth or 
Cousquces. 
h 



Gulf 
Life of Biley 
F 



Simoniz & 
Amer. C&C 
Big Story 
F 

7/13 Best 
In Mystery 



Ponds 
Campbell 

Soup 
Star Stage 
F 



Gillette 
Cavalcade 
of Sports 
L 



State Farm 
Red Barber's 
Corner L 



Joe Lowe 

Corp. 
flu- < iabby 
Hayes Show 
F 



American 
Chicle Co. 
& Co-op 
Ozark 
Jubilee 

L 

Ralston 
Grand Ole 
Opry 
(Every 
fourth 
week) 



Dodge Div. 
The 
Lawrence 
Welk Show 
L 



Emerson Drg. 
Mathiesson 
Masquerade 
Party 
L 



National 

Dairy 
The Big 
Top 
L 



Gen. Mills 
The Lone 
Ranger 
F 



Baseball 
Preview 
Colgate- 
Palmolive 
(Alt. wks.) 
Brown & 
Williamson 
(10 min.) 



Falstaff 

Brew ing 
co-sponsor. 
American 
Safety Razor 

Game of 
i he \\ eek 



\\ riglej 
Gene 
An try 
Show 
F 



Sylvania 
Beat 
the 
Clock 
L 



Buick 
Jackie 
Gleason 
Show 



Nestle 
Stage 
Show 



P. Lorillard 
(Alt. wks.) 
Bulova Wtch. 
Two for the 
Money L 



P&G 
Russ Morgan 
Show 
L 



Liggett & 

M vers 
Gunsmoke 
(3 of i wks.) 
F 



Mennen Co. 
High 
Finance 



Heinz 
Capt. 
Gallant 
F 



Mr. 
Wizard 
L 



Speidel 
Purex 
Down 

You Go 
L 



Sunbeam 
Gold Seal 
Noxzema 
Kleenex 
Armour 
Toni 

7/14 Julius 
La Rosa 
L 



Toni 
Papermate 

People 
Are Funny 
F 



Purex 
Whitehall 
Festival 
of Stars 
F 



Armour 

(alt.) 
Pet Milk 
Encore 
Theatre 
F 



Am. Tobacco 
Warner 
Lambert 
Adventure 
Theatre F 



Noon 



12:15 



12:30 



12:45 



1 :00 



1:15 



1:30 



1 :45 



2:00 



2:15 



2:30 



2:45 



3:00 



3:15 



3:30 



3:45 



4:00 



4:15 



4:30 



4:45 



5:00 



5:15 



5:30 



5:45 



6:00 



6:15 



6:30 



6:45 



7:00 



7:15 



7:30 



7:45 



8:00 



8:15 



8:30 



8:45 



9:00 



9:15 



9:30 



9:45 



10:00 



10:15 



10:30 



10:45 



I TELEGAS" 

wm 




SATURDAY 

CBS: Capt. Kangaroo. 9-9:30 
a.m.; General Foods Mighty 
Mouse Playhouse, 10:30-11 
a.m., alt. weeks; Winky Dink 
and You. 11-11:30 a.m.; Tales 
of Texas Ranger (Curtis 
Candy, General Mills, alt. 
weeks), 11:30-12 noon. 



NBC: Pinky Lee Show, 10- 
10:30 a.m.; I Married Joan. 
10:30-11 a.m.; Fury (General 
Foods), 11-11:30 a.m.; Uncle 
Johnny Coons, 11:30-12 noon. 



SUNDAY 

CBS: Lamp Unto My Feet, 10- 
10:30 a.m.; Look Up And Live, 
10:30-11 a.m.; Eye on New 
York, 11-11:30 a.m. Camera 
Three, 11:30-12 nooh. 



MONDAY-FRIDAY 

CBS: Good Morning, 7-8 a.m.; 
Captain Kangaroo, 8-9 a.m. 
(participating sponsors); 
Garry Moore. M-Th., 10-10:30 
a.m.; Fri., 10-11:30 a.m.; Ar- 
thur Godfrey. M-Th., 10- 
10:30; (see footnotes); Strike 
It Rich. 11:15-12 noon. 



NBC: Today, 7-9 a.m. (partic- 
ipating sponsors); Ding Dong 
School, 10-10:30 (see foot- 
notes) ; Ernie Kovacs Show. 
10:30-11 a.m.; Home, 11-12 
noon (participating sponsors). 



FOOTNOTES: 

explanation : 'Programs in 
italics, sustaining; Time, F.KT ; 
L, live: F, film; K, kinescope 
recording; K. Eastern net- 
work; M. Midwestern. 



ABC — Afternoon Film Festival, 
Mon.-Fri. — Kendall Co., Ster- 
ling Drugs, Norwich Pharm. 
Miekey Mouse Club, Mon.-Fri. 
5-6. Am. Par.. Armour, Bristol- 
Myers, Campbell Soup, Carna- 
tion, Coca-Cola, Cen. Mills, S. 
C. Johnson it Son. Lettuce Tne., 
Mattel. Mars. Miles Labs, Min- 
nesota Alining, Morton Salt, 
SOS, Tv Time Foods, Welch, 
Vicks. 



CHS— Garry Moore M.-Fri. 15 
min. segments sponsored by 
Campbell Soup, Lever Bros., 
Hazel Bishop, Toni, General 
Mills, Serta, Best Foods, Hy- 
tron, Yardley, Converted Rice. 

Arthur Godfrey M.-Thurs. 15 
min. segments sponsored by 
Bristol Myers, Standard 
Brands, Kendall Co.. Norwich 
Pharmacal, Manhattan Soap, 
Lever Bros., Pillsbury. 

House Party — 15 min. segments 
sponsored by Kellogg, Lever. 
Pillsbury, Swift, Campbell 
Soup, Hawaiian Pineapple. 

Bob Crosby — 15 min. segments 
sponsored by Campbell Soup, 
Gerber Prod., Procter & Gam- 
ble, General Mills, Miles Labs, 
Scott Paper Co. 

Ford Star Jubilee, every 4th 
Saturday 9:30-11 p.m. 



© 1956 by Broadcasting 
Publications, Inc. 

BROADCASTING 
TELECASTING 

July 2, 1956 



BT TELE STAT US 



CINCINNATI— 

► WCET (*48) 

► WCPO-TV (9) ABC; Blair; 767,729; N; $1,200 

► WKRC-TV (12) CBS; Katz; 662,236; N; $1,000 

► WLWT (5) NBC; WLW Sis.; 487,000; N; $800 
WQXN-TV (54) Forjoe; 5/14/53-Unknown 

CLEVELAND— 

► WEWS (5) ABC; Blair; 1,210,000; N; $1,000 

► KYW-TV (3) NBC; Peters, Griffin, Woodward; 

1,174,004; N; $1,800 

► WJW-TV (8) CBS; Katz; 1,146,150; N; $1,700 
WERE-TV (65) 6/18/53-Unknown 
WHK-TV (19) 11/25/53-Unknown 

COLUMBUS— „.,,„. 

► WBNS-TV (10) CBS; Blair; 500,400; N; $825 

► WLWC (4) NBC; WLW Sis.; 351,000; N; $800 

► WOSU-TV (*34) 

► WTVN-TV (6) ABC; Katz; 381,451; $600 
DAYTON — 

► WHIO-TV (7) CBS; Hollingbery; 637,330; N; 

► WLWD (2) ABC, NBC; WLW Sis.; 332,000; N; 

$800 

WIFE (22) See footnote 

ELYRIAf — 

WEOL-TV (31) 2/11/54-Unknown 

LIMA — 

► WIMA-TV (35) NBC, CBS, ABC; H-R; 76,487; 

$150 

MANSFIELDf— 

WTVG (36) 6/3/54-Unknown 

MASSILLONf — 

WMAC-TV (23) Petry; 9/4/52 -Unknown 

STEUBENVILLE (WHEELING, W. VA.)— 

► WSTV-TV (9) CBS, ABC; Avery-Knodel; 1,184,- 

839; $400 

► WTRF-TV (7) See Wheeling 

TOLEDO— 

► WSPD-TV (13) CBS, ABC, NBC; Katz; 406,000; 

N; $1,000 

WTOH-TV (79) 10/20/54-Unknown 
YOUNGSTOWN— 

► WFMJ-TV (21) NBC; Headley-Reed; 202,771; N; 

$350 

► WKBN-TV (27) CBS, ABC; Raymer; 202,534; 

N; $350 

WXTV (73) 11/2/55-Unknown 
ZANESVILLE — 

► WHIZ-TV (18) ABC, CBS, NBC; Pearson; 50,- 

000; N; $150 

OKLAHOMA 

ADA— 

► KTEN (10) ABC, CBS, NBC (per program 

basis); Vernard; 93,223; N; $225 

ARDMORE— 

KVSO-TV (12) NBC; Pearson; 5/12/54-7/15/56 

ENID— 

► KGEO-TV (5) ABC; Pearson; 109,000; N; $225 
LAWTONf— 

► KSWO-TV (7) ABC; Pearson; 71,000; $150 
MUSKOGEE— 

►KTVX (8) ABC; Avery-Knodel; 320,000; $500 
OKLAHOMA CITY— 

► KETA(*13) 

► KWTV (9) CBS, ABC; Avery-Knodel; 395,168; 

N; $800 

► WKY-TV (4) NBC, ABC; Katz; 395,168; N, LL, 

LF, LS; $920 
KTVQ (25) See footnote 

TULSA— 

► KOTV (6) CBS; Petry; 319,312; N; $750 

► KTVX (8) (See Muskogee) 

► KVOO-TV (2) NBC; Blair; 319,312; N; $700 
KOED-TV (*11) 7/21/54-Unknown 
KSPG (17) 2/4/54-Unknown 

KCEB (23) See footnote 

OREGON 

EUGENE— 

► KVAL-TV (13) NBC, ABC (CBS per program 

basis); Hollingbery; 55,559; $300 

KLAMATH FALLSf — 

KOTI (2) 12/2/54- August; Hoag-Blair; $150 

MEDFORD— 

► KBES-TV (5) ABC, CBS, NBC; Hoag-Blair; 35,- 

700; $200 
PORTLAND— 

► KLOR (12) ABC; Hollingbery; 340,000; N; $700 

► KOIN-TV (6) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 317,700; N; 

$700 

► KPTV (27) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 356,442; N, LF, 

LS; $700 
KGW-TV (8) 6/23/55-Unknown 

ROSEBURGf— 

► KPIC (4) Hollingbery (satellite of KVAL-TV 

Eugene, Ore.) 

SALEMf — 

KSLM-TV (3) 9/30/53-Unknown 

PENNSYLVANIA 

ALLENTOWNf— 

WQCY (39) Weed; 8/12/53-Unknown 
WFMZ-TV (67) See footnote 

ALTOONA— 

► WFBG-TV (10) CBS, ABC, NBC; H-R; 573,731; 

$750 

Page 88 • July 2, 1956 



BETHLEHEM— 

► WLEV-TV (51) NBC; Meeker; 89,307; N; $200 
EASTONf— 

► WGLV (57) ABC; Headley-Reed; 94,635; $175 
ERIE— 

► WICU (12) NBC, ABC; Petry; 223,500; N; $700 

► WSEE (35) CBS, ABC; Avery-Knodel; 101,436; 

$250 

HARRISBURG— 

► WCMB-TV (27) Forjoe; $200 

► WHP-TV (55) CBS; Boiling; 241,449; $325 

► WTPA (71) ABC; Harrington, Righter & Par- 

sons; 200,000; N; $350 

HAZLETONf — 

WAZL-TV (63) Meeker; 12/18/52-Unknown 
JOHNSTOWN— 

► WARD-TV (56) ABC, CBS; Weed; $200 

► WJ AC-TV (6) NBC, CBS, ABC; Katz; 988,122; 

N, LL, LS, LF; $750 

LANCASTER (HARRISBURG, YORK)— 

► WGAL-TV (8) NBC, CBS; Meeker; 917,320; N, 

LS, LF; $1,200 

LEBANONf — 

WLBR-TV (15) See footnote 
NEW CASTLE— 

WKST-TV (45) See footnote 
PHILADELPHIA— 

► WCAU-TV (10) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 2,094,852 

N, LF, LS; $3,250 

► WFIL-TV (6) ABC; Blair; 2,105,636; N, LS, LF 

$2,875 

► WRCV-TV (3) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 2,088,318 

N; $3,200 

WHYY-TV (*35) 3/28/56-Unknown 
WPHD (23) 9/28/55-Unknown 
WSES (29) 3/28/56-Unknown 
PITTSBURGH— 

► KDKA-TV (2) NBC, CBS, ABC; Peters, Griffin, 

Woodward; 1,200,000; N; $1,700 

► WENS (16) ABC; Branham; 420,000; $450 

► WQED (*13) 

WIIC (11) CBS; Blair; 7/20/55-Unknown 
WTVQ (47) Headley-Reed; 12/23/52-Unknown 
Tv City Inc. (4) Initial Decision 4/23/56 
WKJF-TV (53) See footnote 
READING— 

► WHUM-TV (61) CBS, ABC; Weed; 211,900; N; 

$450 

WEEU-TV (33) See footnote 
SCRANTON— 

► WARM-TV (16) ABC; Boiling; 200,000; $225 

► WGBI-TV (22) CBS; H-R; 286,500; N; $500 
WTVU (44) (See footnote) 

SHARONf — 

WSHA (39) 1/27/54-Unknown 
SUNBURYf— 

WKOK-TV (38) 2/9/55-Unknown 
WILKES-BARRE— 

► WBRE-TV (28) NBC; Headley-Reed; 306,000; N; 

$450 

► WILK-TV (34) ABC; Avery-Knodel; 306,000; N; 

$300 

WILLI AMSPORTf — 

WRAK-TV (36) Everett -McKinney; 11/13/52- 
October 

YORK— 

► WNOW-TV (49) Keller; 116,500; $200 

► WSBA-TV (43) ABC; Young; 116,450; $200 

RHODE ISLAND 

PROVIDENCE— 

► WJAR-TV (10) NBC, ABC; Weed; 1,404,202; N; 

$1,200 

► WPRO-TV (12) CBS; Blair; 1,404,202; $1,000 
WNET (16) See footnote 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

ANDERSON— 

► WAIM-TV (40) CBS; Headley-Reed; 127,550; N; 

$200 

CAMDENf — 

WACA-TV (14) 6/3/53-Unknown 
CHARLESTON— 

► WCSC-TV (5) CBS, ABC; Peters, Griffin, Wood- 

ward; 244,844; N; $300 

► WUSN-TV (2) NBC, ABC; Weed; 202,000; $300 

COLUMBIA— 

► WIS-TV (10) NBC, ABC; Peters, Griffin, Wood- 

ward; 208,770; N; $400 

► WNOK-TV (67) CBS, ABC; Raymer; 110,000; 

$200 
FLORENCE— 

► WBTW (8) CBS, NBC, ABC; CBS Spot Sis.; 

154,265; $300 

GREENVILLE— 

► WFBC-TV (4) NBC; Weed; 437,542; N; $450 
WGVL (23) See footnote 

SPARTANBURG— 

► WSPA-TV (7) CBS; Hollingbery; 286,765; $400 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

FLORENCE"}-— 

► KDLO-TV (3) (Satellite of KELO-TV Sioux 

Falls) 

RAPID CITYf— 

► KOTA-TV (3) CBS, ABC, NBC; Headley-Reed; 

18,330; $150 

SIOUX FALLS— 

► KELO-TV (11) NBC, ABC, CBS; H-R; 181,035 

(includes coverage of satellite KDLO-TV Flor- 
ence); $425 



TENNESSEE 

BRISTOL— 

► WCYB-TV (5) (See Bristol, Va.) 
CHATTANOOGA— 

► WDEF-TV (12) CBS, ABC; Branham; 180,630; 

N; $450 

► WRGP-TV (3) NBC; H-R; $400 
JACKSON— 

► WDXI-TV (7) CBS, ABC; Headley-Reed; 102,- 

385; N; $200 

JOHNSON CITY— 

► WJHL-TV (11) CBS, ABC, NBC; Pearson; 185,- 

316; $250 (film) 

KNOXVILLE — 

► WATE (6) NBC, ABC; Avery-Knodel; 229,130; 

N; $600 

► WTVK (26) CBS, ABC; Pearson; 175,000; N; $360 
WBIR-TV (10) 1/13/56-August; CBS; Katz; $600 

MEMPHIS— 

► WHBQ-TV (13) ABC; H-R; 431,428; $700 

► WMCT (5) NBC; Blair; 431,428; N; $900 

► WREC-TV (3) CBS; Katz; 401,127; $900 
WKNO-TV (*10) 11/23/50-7/30/56 

NASHVILLE— 

► WLAC-TV (5) CBS; Katz; 489,958; N; $650 

► WSIX-TV (8) ABC; Hollingbery; 378,000; $425 

► WSM-TV (4) NBC; Petry; 258,116; N, LF, LS; 

$825 

TEXAS 

ABILENE— 

► KRBC-TV (9) NBC, ABC; Pearson; 59,760; $225 
AMARILLO — 

► KFDA-TV (10) CBS, ABC; H-R; 85,591; $300 

► KGNC-TV (4) NBC; Katz; 85,591; N; $340 

AUSTIN— 

► KTBC-TV (7) CBS, ABC, NBC; Raymer; 158,- 

126; N; $400 

BEAUMONT— 

► KBMT (31) ABC, NBC; Forjoe; 40,000; N, LL, 

LF, LS; $200 . 

► KFDM-TV (6) CBS, ABC; Peters, Griffin, Wood- 

ward; 109,000; N, LF; $350 

BIG SPRING— 

► KBST-TV (4) CBS (ABC per program basis); 

Pearson; 48,453; $150 

BROWNWOOD— 

Brownwood Tv Co. (19) 6/6/56-Unknown 
CORPUS CHRISTIf— 

► KRIS-TV (6) NBC; Peters, Griffin, Woodward; 

80,000; N, LF, LS; $300 

► KVDO-TV (22) NBC, ABC, CBS (per program 

basis) ; Young; 53,500; $200 
K-Six Tv Inc. (10) Initial Decision 1/20/55 

DALLAS— 

► KRLD-TV (4) CBS; Branham; 564,080; N; $1,100 

► WFAA-TV (8) ABC, NBC; Petry; 564,080; N; 

$1,000 

EL PASO— 

► KROD-TV (4) CBS, ABC; Branham; 90,778; N; 

$450 

► KTSM-TV (9) NBC; Hollingbery; 87,027; N; 

$325 

KILT (13) H-R; 3/18/54-July 
FT. WORTH— 

► WBAP-TV (5) ABC, NBC; Peters, Griffin, 

Woodward; 585,000; N, LL, LF, LS; $1,000 

► KFJZ-TV (11) H-R; 540,930; $600 

GALVESTON (HOUSTON)— 

► KGUL-TV (11) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 459,250; 

$1,000 

HARLINGENf (BROWNSVILLE, Mc ALLEN, 
WESLACO)— 

► KGBT-TV (4) CBS, ABC; H-R; 85,817 (plus 

8,000 Mexican coverage); $300 

HOUSTON— 

► KPRC-TV (2) NBC; Petry; 492,000; N; $1,000 

► KTRK (13) ABC; Hollingbery; 492,000; N, LF, 

LS; $850 

► KUHT (*8) 

► KGUL-TV (11) See Galveston 
KNUZ-TV (39) See footnote 
KXYZ-TV (29) 6/18/53-Unknown 

LAREDOf — 

► KHAD-TV (8) CBS, NBC, ABC; Pearson; 12,864; 

$150 

LONGVIEWf — 

► KTVE (32) Forjoe; 55,268; $175 
LUBBOCK— 

► KCBD-TV (11) NBC, ABC; Raymer; 120,859; N; 

$350 

► KDUB-TV (13) CBS; Branham; 126,745; N, LS, 

LF; $350 (film) 

LUFKIN— 

► KTRE-TV (9) Venard; 54,028; $225 (Station re- 

ceives NBC programs from KPRC-TV Houston 
but is not an NBC affiliate.) 

MIDLAND— 

► KMID-TV (2) NBC, ABC; Venard; 78,000; $200 
ODESSA— 

► KOSA-TV (7) CBS; Pearson; 78,500; $225 
SAN ANGELO— 

► KTXL-TV (8) CBS, NBC, ABC; Venard; 44,309; 

$200 

SAN ANTONIO— 

► KCOR-TV (41) ABC; O'Connell; 70,000; $200 

► KENS-TV (5) CBS, ABC; Peters, Griffin, Wood- 

ward; 312,626; N; $700 

► WOAI-TV (4) NBC, ABC; Petry; 311,908; N, LL, 

LS, LF; $700 
KONO-TV (12) 5/23/56-Unknown 

BROADCASTING • TELECASTING 



SWEETWATER— 

► KPAR-TV (12) CBS; Branham; 62,469; $200 

(satellite of KDUB-TV Lubbock, Tex.) 

TEMPLE (WACO)— 

► KCEN-TV (6) NBC; Hollingbery; 152,647; N; 

$300 

TEXARKANA (ALSO TEXARKANA, ARK.)— 

► KCMC-TV (6) CBS, ABC; Venard; 161,840; N; 

$260 

TYLER— 

► KLTV (7) NBC, ABC, CBS; Pearson; 108,000; 

$250 

WACO (TEMPLE)— 

► KWTX-TV (10) ABC, CBS; Pearson; 123,000; N; 

$250 

WESCALOf (BROWNSVILLE, HARLINGEN, 
McALLEN) — 

► KRGV-TV (5) NBC; Pearson; 583.704 (plus 8,000 

Mexican coverage); $250 

WICHITA FALLS — 

► KFDX-TV (3) NBC, ABC; Raymer; 105,135; N; 

$300 

► KSYD-TV (6) CBS; Hoag-Blair; 105,030; $300 

UTAH 

SALT LAKE CITY 

► KSL-TV (5) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 208,336; N; 

$600 

► KTVT (4) NBC; Katz; 208,336; N; $600 

► KUTV (2) ABC; Hollingbery; 208,336; $450 

VERMONT 

BURLINGTON— 

► WCAX-TV (3) CBS; Weed; 139,135; $300 

VIRGINIA 

BRISTOLf— 

WCYB-TV (5) Gill-Perna; 4/13/56-August 1 
DANVILLEf— 

WBTM-TV (24) See footnote 
HAMPTON— 

► WVEC-TV (15) See Norfolk 
HARRISONBURG— 

► WSVA-TV (3) ABC, CBS, NBC; Pearson; 138.- 

633; $200 

LYNCHBURG— 

► WLVA-TV (13) ABC; Hollingbery; 308,675; N; 

$300 (film) 

NEWPORT NEWS— 

WACH-TV (33) See footnote 
NORFOLK— 

► WTAR-TV (3) CBS, ABC; Petry; 405,722; N, LS, 

LF; $875 

► WTOV-TV (27) 210,000; McGillvra: $380 

► WVEC-TV (15) NBC; Avery-Knodel; 180,000; 

N; $400 

PETERSBURG— 

► WXEX-TV (8) See Richmond 
PORTSMOUTH— 

WAVY-TV (10) 5/30/56-Unknown 
RICHMOND— 

► WRVA-TV (12) CBS; Harrington. Righter & 

Parsons 

► WTVR (6) ABC, CBS; Blair; 503,317; N, LF, LS; 

$875 

► WXEX-TV (8) NBC; Forjoe; 415,835; N., LF. 

LS; $750 
WOTV (29) 12/2/53-Unknown 
ROANOKE— 

► WDBJ-TV (7) CBS; Peters, Griffin, Woodward 

► WSLS-TV (10) ABC, NBC; Avery-Knodel; 453.- 

226; N, LF, LS; $675 

WASHINGTON 

BELLI NGH AM— 

► KVOS-TV (12) CBS; Forjoe; 232,661; $300 
EPHRATAf — 

KBAS-TV (43) 5/4/55-Unknown 
PASCO— 

► KEPR-TV (19) CBS, ABC, NBC; 57,750 (satellite 

of KIMA-TV Yakima) 
SEATTLE (TACOMA)— 

► KCTS (*9) 

► KING-TV (5) ABC; Blair; 510,000; N, LF, LS; 

$900 

► KOMO-TV (4) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 514,070; N, 

LL, FL, LS; $1,025 

► KTNT-TV (11) CBS; Weed; 513,700; N; $900 

► KTVW (13) Hollingbery; $510,000: $600 

Queen City Bcstg. Co. (7) Initial Decision 
4/5/55 

SPOKANE— 

► KHQ-TV (6) NBC; Katz; 159,680; N, LL, LF, 

LS; $625 

► KREM-TV (2) ABC; Petry; 172.798; N, LL, LS; 

$450 

► KXLY-TV (4) CBS; Avery-Knodel; 173,358; N, 

LL, LF, LS; $600 

VANCOUVER!— 

KVAN-TV (21) Boiling; 9/25/53-Unknown 
YAKIMA— 

► KIMA-TV (29) CBS, ABC, NBC; Weed; 80,000; 

$400 

KRSM (23) 3/30/55-Unknown 

WEST VIRGINIA 

BLUEFIELD— 

► WHIS-TV (6) NBC; Katz; 209,757; N; $200 
CHARLESTON— 

► WCHS-TV (8) CBS; Branham; 540,340; N, LF, 

LS; $550 
WKNA-TV (49) See footnote 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



CLARKSBURG t — 

WBLK-TV (12) Branham; 2/17/54-August 

FAIRMONTf— 

WJPB-TV (35) See footnote 

HUNTINGTON— 

► WHTN-TV (13) ABC; Petry; 203,000; N; $450 

► WSAZ-TV (3) NBC; Katz; 660,266; N, LL, LF, 

LS; $800 

OAK HILL (BECKLEY)f— 

► WOAY-TV (4) ABC; Pearson; 357,230; $200 
PARKERSBURG— 

► WTAP (15) NBC, ABC, CBS; Pearson; 41,700; 

$150 

WHEELING (STEUBENVILLE, OHIO) — ■ 

► WTRF-TV (7) NBC, ABC; Hollingbery; 312,500; 

N; $500 

► WSTV-TV (9) See Steubenville, Ohio 
WLTV (51) 2/11/53-Unknown 

WISCONSIN 

EAU CLAIRE— 

► WEAU-TV (13) NBC, ABC; Hollingbery; 122,- 

560; $200 

GREEN BAY— 

► WBAY-TV (2) CBS; Weed; 247,000; $500 

► WFRV-TV (5) ABC, CBS; Headley-Reed; 239,- 

340; N; $300 

► WMBV-TV (11) See Marinette 

LA CROSSE— 

► WKBT (8) CBS, NBC, ABC; H-R; 110,000; $360 

MADISON— 

► WHA-TV (*21) 

► WISC-TV (3) Peters, Griffin, Woodward; $500 

► WKOW-TV (27) CBS; Headley-Reed; 127,250; 

N" $250 

► WMTV (33) ABC, NBC; Boiling 140,000; $280 
MARINETTE (GREEN BAY)— 

► WMBV-TV (11) NBC, ABC; Venard; 220.826; 

$250 

MILWAUKEE— 

► WISN-TV (12) ABC; Petry; 700.000; N, LF, LS; 

$800 

► WITI-TV (6) Branham; 700,000; N, LL, LF, LS; 

$600 

► WTMJ-TV (4) NBC; Harrington, Righter & 

Parsons; 781,222; N. LL, LF, LS; $1,150 

► WXIX (19) CBS. CBS Spot Sis.; 371,000; N; $800 
WFOX-TV (31) 5/4/55-Unknown 
Milwaukee Board of Vocational & Adult Educa- 

cation C10) 6/6/56-Unknown 
WCAN-TV (25) See footnote 

SUPERIOR (DULUTH, MINN.)— 

► WDSM-TV (6) NBC; Peters, Griffin, Wood- 

ward: 127,800: $400 

► KDAL-TV (3) See Duluth. Minn. 

WAUSAU— 

► WSAU-TV (7) CBS, NBC, (ABC per program 

basis); Meeker; 93,100; $250 

WHITEFISH BAY— 

► WITI-TV (6) See Milwaukee 

WYOMING 

CHEYENNE — 

► KFBC-TV (5) CBS, ABC. NBC; Hollingbery; 

70,972; $150 

ALASKA 

ANCHORAGEf — 

► KENI-TV (2) ABC. NBC; Fletcher, Day; 23,000; 

$150 

► KTVA (11) CBS; Alaska Radio-Tv Sis.; 23,000; 

$150 

FAIRBANKS!— 

► KFAR-TV (2) NBC, ABC; Fletcher, Day; 8.600; 

$150 

► KTVF (11) CBS; Alaska Radio-Tv Sis.; 8,600; 

$130 

JUNEAU — 

► KINY-TV (8) CBS; Alaska Radio-Tv Sis.; 2,500 

$60 

GUAM 

AGANAf— 

KUAM-TV (8) 3/28/56-August; NBC; Young; 
$120 

HAWAII 

HILOf — 

► KHBC-TV (9) (Satellite of KGMB-TV Hono- 

lulu ) 

HONOLULUf — 

► KGMB-TV (9) CBS; Peters, Griffin, Woodward; 

94.982 (includes Hilo and Wailuku satellites); 
$300 

► KONA (2) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 91,782 (plus 

Wailuku satellite); $405 

► KULA-TV (4) ABC; Young; 90,246; $135 

WAILUKUf— 

► KMAU (3) (Satellite of KGMB-TV Honolulu) 

► KMVI-TV (12) (Satellite of KONA Honolulu); 

$27 

PUERTO RICO 

CAGUASf — 

WSUR-TV (11) 4/25/56-Unknown 

MAYAGUEZf— 

► WORA-TV (5) CBS, ABC, NBC; Young; 26,000; 

$120 

PONCEf— 

WKBM-TV (9) 5/3/56 -Unknown 
SAN JUAN v — 

► WAPA-TV (4) ABC, NBC; Caribbean Net- 

works; 100,000; $133 

► WKAQ-TV (2) CBS; Inter-American; 104,778; 

$300 

WIPR-TV (*6) 2/2/55-December 



CANADA . 

BARRIE, ONT.— 

► CKVR-TV (3) Mulvihill, Canadian Ltd.; 36,876 
BRANDON, MAN.f — 

► CKX-TV (5) CBC; All-Canada, Weed; 13.288; 

$170 

CALGARY, ALTA.— 

► CHCT-TV (2) CBC, ABC, CBS, NBC; All-Can- 

ada, Weed; 45,000; $260 
EDMONTON, ALTA.f— 

► CFRN-TV (3) CBC; Radio Rep., Young, Oakes; 

48,500; $325 
HALIFAX, N. S.f— 

► CBHT (3) CBC, CBS; 26,000; $220 
HAMILTON, ONT.— 

► CHCH-TV (11) CBC; All-Canada, Young; 484,- 

196; $450 
KINGSTON, ONT.— 

► CKWS-TV (11) CBC; All-Canada; 55,000; $250 
KITCHENER, ONT.— 

► CKCO-TV (13) CBC; Hardy, Hunt, Weed; 

311,213; $400 
LETHBRIDGE, ALTA.— 

► CJLH-TV (7) CBC; All-Canada, Weed; 10,000; 

$160 

LONDON, ONT.— 

► CFPL-TV (10) CBC, ABC, CBS, NBC; All- 

Canada, Weed; 109,920; $370 
MONCTON, N. B.— 

► CKCW-TV (2) CBC; Young, Stovin; 32,000; $200 
MONTREAL, QUE.— 

► CBFT (2) CBC French; CBC; 337,000; $900 

► CBMT (6) CBC, NBC, ABC, CBS; 460,000; $680 
NORTH BAY, ONT.— 

► CKGN-TV (10) 
OTTAWA, ONT.— 

►CBOFT (9) CBC; CBC; 42,000; $230 
►CBOT (4) CBC; CBC; 79,000; $320 
PETERBOROUGH, ONT.— 

► CHEX-TV (12) CBC; All-Canada, Weed; 31,000; 

$230 

PORT ARTHUR, ONT.f — 

► CFPA-TV (2) CBC; All-Canada, Weed; 15,000; 

$170 

QUEBEC CITY, QUE.— 

► CFCM-TV (4) CBC; Hardy, Hunt, Weed; 30,000; 

$350 

REGINA, SASK.f— 

► CKCK-TV (2) CBC; All-Canada, Weed; 31,000; 

$260 

RIMOUSKI, QUE.f— 

► CJBR-TV (3) CBC; Stovin, Young; 30,000; $200 
ST. JOHN, N. B.f— 

► CHSJ-TV (4) CBC; All-Canada, Weed; 62,550 

(including U. S.); $250 

ST. JOHN'S, NFLD. — 

► CJON-TV (6) CBC, CBS, NBC, ABC; All-Can- 

ada, Weed; 16,000; $200 
SASKATOON, SASK.f— 

► CFQC-TV (8) CBC, ABC, CBS, NBC; Radio 

Rep.; 30,000, $230 
SAULT STE. MARIE, ONT.— 

► CJIC-TV (2) CBC; All-Canada, Weed; 14,000; 

$170 

SUDBURY, ONT.— 

► CKSO-TV (5) CBC, ABC, CBS. NBC; All-Can- 

ada. Weed; 19,590; $220 
SYDNEY, N. S.f— 

► CJCB-TV (4) CBC; All-Canada, Weed; 46,«90; 

$240 

TIMMINS, ONT.— 

► CFCL-TV (6) Renaud, McGillvra 
TORONTO, ONT.— 

► CBLT (9) CBC, ABC, CBS, NBC; CBC; 440,000; 

$950 

VANCOUVER, B. C.f— 

► CBUT (2) CBC; CBC; 142,000; $500 
WINDSOR, ONT. (DETROIT, MICH.) — 

► CKLW-TV (9) CBC; Young; 1,588,000; $450 
WINGHAM, ONT. — 

► CKNX-TV (8) CBS; All-Canada, Young; 77,240; 

$200 

WINNIPEG, MAN.f— 

► CBWT (4) CBC; CBC; 69,000; $320 

MEXICO 
JUAREZf (EL PASO, TEX.)— 

► XEJ-TV (5) National Times Sales; Oakes; 69,- 

158; $240 
TIJUANAf (SAN DIEGO)— 

► XETV (6) ABC; Weed; 324,558; $700 



The following stations have suspended regular 
operations but have not turned in CP's: KBID- 
TV Fresno, Calif.; WPFA-TV Pensacola, Fla.; 
WATL-TV Atlanta, Ga.; WOKA (TV) Macon, Ga.; 
WRAY-TV Princeton, Ind.; KGTV (TV) Dei 
Moines, Iowa; WKLO-TV Louisville, Ky.; WWOR- 
TV Worcester, Mass.; WLAM-TV Lewiston, Me.; 
WFTV Duluth, Minn.; WCOC-TV Meridian, Mis».; 
WFPG-TV Atlantic City, N. J.; WRTV (TV) As- 
bury Park, N. J.; WICA-TV Ashtabula, Ohio; 
WGVL (TV) Greenville, S. C; WQMC (TV) Char- 
lotte. N. C; WIFE (TV) Dayton, Ohio; KTVQ 
(TV) Oklahoma City, Okla.; KCEB (TV) Tulsa, 
Okla.; WFMZ-TV Allentown. Pa.; WLBR-TV 
Lebanon, Pa.; WKST-TV New Castle, Pa.; WKJF- 
TV Pittsburgh, Pa.; WEEU-TV Reading, Pa.; 
WNET (TV) Providence, R. I.; KNUZ-TV Hous- 
ton, Tex.; WBTM-TV Danville, Va.; WACH-TV 
Newport News, Va.; WKNA-TV Charleston, W. 
Va.; WJPB-TV Fairmont, W. Va.; WCAN-TV 
Milwaukee; WIRK-TV W. Palm Beach, Fla.; 
WTAO-TV Cambridge, Mass.; KEDD (TV) Wich- 
ita. Kans.; WTVU (TV) Scranton, Pa. 

July 2, 1956 • Page 89 



AMERICAN RESEARCH BUREAU 

March, 1956 Report 
GRAND RAPIDS- KALAMAZOO 





Number of Quarter 1 
with Higher Ratin 


burs 
9« 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
8 a.m. - 6 p.m. 
6 p.m. - 1 1 p.m. 


WZKO-TV 
136 
87 


Stati 
6 
1 


an B> 
1 

3 | 


SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 
1 a.m. - 1 1 p.m. 


72 


3 


2 



NOTE: Survey based on sampling in the following 
proportions — Grand Rapids (44.7%), Kalamazoo 
(19.7%), Battle Creek (18.2%), Muskegon-Muskegon 
Heights (17.4%). 




MARCH ARB TOP TWENTY ALL ON WKZO-TV 




1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 



Program 
I've Got A Secret 
Wyatt Earp 
Disneyland 
I Love Lucy 
Ed Sullivan 
Godfrey & Friends 
The Millionaire 
Name That Tune 
Godfrey's Talent Scouts 
Robin Hood 
Mama 

Burns and Allen 

Sgt. Preston of the Yukon 

$64,000 Question 

Climax 

December Bride 
Mobile Theatre 
Honeymooners 
Rin Tin Tin 
Lone Ranger 



MICHIGAN 



INDIANA 



WKZO-TV (Channel 3) has 100,000 watts of power — 1000-foot 
tower — offers you 600,000 families within its grade B coverage 



area 



k- TV 




97ie cfietwi {ftatimib 

WKZO-TV — GRAND R APIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF-FM — GRAND R APIDS-KALAMAZOO 
KOLN-TV — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 
Associated with 

WMBD RADIO — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



So more than ever, WKZO-TV can put you ot>er the top in 
sales in Western Michigan! 

100,000 WATTS • CHANNEL 3 • 1000' TOWER 




Kalamazoo -Grand Rapids and Greater Western Michigan 

Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



Page 90 



• July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



TEXT OF FCC REPORT & ORDER 
ON TELEVISION ALLOCATIONS 

(See story, this issue) 



FCC 56-587 
33117 

Before the 
FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS 
COMMISSION 
Washington 25, D. C. 

In the Matter of 

Amendment of Part 3 of the Docket 
Commission's Rules and {• 21532 

Regulations Governing 
Television Broadcast Stations. 

REPORT AND ORDER 

By the Commission: Commissioners Hyde, Web- 
ster, Bartley, and Mack concurring and 
issuing statements; Commissioner Doerfer 
dissenting and issuing a statement. 

1. Prior to Nov. 10, 1955, when this pro- 
ceeding was initiated (Notice of Proposed Rule 
Making, FCC 55-1124), television broadcasters 
and other elements of the television industry 
had submitted numerous suggestions and, in 
some cases, formal petitions for revisions of 
the television allocation plan. 

2. The scope of these proposals and the 
methods employed varied widely. They ranged 
from channel reassignments affecting a single 
city to major revisions affecting the entire 
country. The methods included such diverse and 
mutually inconsistent approaches as conversion 
to an all vhf system, conversion to an all uhf 
system, and continued use of both bands under 
a wide variety of proposals. Some of the latter 
envisaged the more or less extensive increase of 
the number of vhf channel assignments through 
the use of new vhf channels, the use of the 
present 12 vhf channels under reduced spacings. 
or both. Others contemplated the elimination 
or transfer elsewhere of vhf commercial chan- 
nels and the substitution, locally, of uhf chan- 
nels. Some proposals were based on the revision 
of the existing engineering standards and poli- 
cies, notably with respect to minimum spacings, 
maximum antenna heights and powers, the 
directionalizing of antennas, and the use of 
cross polarization. Other proposals advocated 
the maintenance of present standards. In short, 
the Commission was called upon to consider an 
extensive array of widely differing remedies for 
the difficulties which had hindered the further 
expansion of the nation's television service and 
the fuller achievement of the objectives of the 
Sixth Report and Order. 

3. Briefly stated, those objectives were to 
encourage the development of a nationwide, 
competitive television system in which: 

(a) All areas would have at least one service; 

(b) The largest possible number of communi- 
ties would have at least one local tele- 
vision station; and 

(c) Multiple services would be available in 
as many communities and areas as possi- 
ble to provide adequate program choice 
to the public and encourage the develop- 
ment of competition — among broadcast- 
ers, networks and other elements of the 
industry. 

4. Among these three basic objectives, the 



greatest progress has been made in achieving the 
first. It is estimated that over 90% of the 
population can receive service from at least one 
television station. Less progress has been real- 
ized toward achievement of the second objec- 
tive. Of the 1,260 communities to which at least 
one television channel is assigned, fewer than 
300 have one or more stations on the air. As for 
the third objective, approximately 75% of the 
population receive service from two or more 
television stations. Slightly over 100 communi- 
ties have two or more television stations in 
operation, as compared with 348 communities 
to which two or more television channels are 
assigned. 

5. The foregoing reflects substantial progress 
during the four years which have elapsed since 
the present television allocation plan and en- 
gineering standards were adopted. Serious prob- 
lems have arisen, however, which are impeding 
the continued expansion of the nation's televi- 
sion services. There is general agreement on the 
sources of these problems. In brief, they are: 

(a) The limitation to 12 channels in the vhf 
band; and 

(b) Difficulties which have been experienced 
in achieving fuller utilization of the 70 
uhf channels. These difficulties have 
been ascribed chiefly to: 

(1) The large numbers of vhf-only re- 
ceivers in use and the high propor- 
tion of vhf-only receivers which con- 
tinue to be manufactured. 

(2) Performance deficiencies of uhf 
transmitting and receiving equip- 
ment during the initial 4-year period 
of the utilization of uhf for televi- 
sion broadcasting. 

(3) The consequent preference of pro- 
gram and revenue sources for vhf 
outlets. 

6. While some of the numerous suggestions, 
proposals and petitions before the Commission 
last November appeared to merit consideration, 
none was sufficiently free from disadvantage 
and difficulty to warrant adoption without exten- 
sive study and evaluation. Therefore this pro- 
ceeding was initiated on Nov. 10, 1955, to pro- 
vide an orderly basis for examining and compar- 
ing the proposals and comments of all interested 
parties. Because the problems were nationwide 
in scope, and because widely divergent ap- 
proaches to their solution required evaluation 
initially on a broad, nationwide basis, the Com- 
mission stated, in its Notice of Proposed Rule 
Making, that it would be premature at the out- 
set to consider proposals whose scope was 
limited to action affecting only single communi- 
ties or local areas. 

7. Accordingly, the Commission requested 
the submission of proposals and comments re- 
lating to overall solutions on a broad, nation- 
wide basis. At the same time the Commission 
terminated five rule making proceedings which 
had been initiated earlier on petitions for the 
deintermixture of five individual communities 
(Report and Order, Nov. 10, 1955, Dockets 
11238, 11333, 11334, 11335 and 11336, FCC 
55-1 125), and denied a number of other similar 



petitions on which rule making had not been 
initiated (Memorandum Opinion and Order, 
Nov. 10, 1955, FCC 55-1126). 

8. Aided by the proposals, comments and data 
submitted in this proceeding, the Commission 
has now had an opportunity to examine and 
compare the different basic approaches which 
are advocated by members of the television in- 
dustry. The material filed has been painstak- 
ingly studied and evaluated in the endeavor to 
accomplish the object of the proceeding, which 
was to reach a decision as to the basic lines on 
which it would be in the public interest to revise 
the nationwide television system, and thus pro- 
vide a basis for determining the specific reassign- 
ments which could usefully be made in indi- 
vidual communities in conformity with the 
nationwide policies adopted herein. 

9. In evaluating the proposals before us it 
has been necessary to recognize that, while 
actions by this Commission determine the num- 
bers of channels which are available for tele- 
vision broadcasting, the extent to which they 
are actually utilized depends upon the construc- 
tion and operation of stations by qualified broad- 
casters who are able and willing to enter this 
field of private, free enterprise and to cope, as 
entrepreneurs, with the conditions of the market- 
place. The opportunity for profit is accom- 
panied by the risk of loss. Whether broad- 
cast operations yield one or the other is de- 
pendent on economic and technical factors, 
many of which are beyond the Commission's 
control. One important economic factor is 
the high cost of the construction, operation and 
programming of television stations as compared 
with similar costs for radio stations. Because 
of this, under the present economics of televi- 
sion, fewer communities are able, at this stage, 
to support television stations than can support 
radio stations. Also, because of the dependence 
of television stations on network and other na- 
tionally distributed programming, the tech- 
niques, developed over the years in the aural 
broadcasting service, which enable numerous 
radio stations to operate successfully with a high 
proportion of local, non-network programming, 
have not so far been developed to as great an 
extent in the television field. This has meant 
that both vhf and uhf stations which have not 
been able to secure their principal programs 
from a major network have found survival diffi- 
cult, if not impossible. But since it has also 
meant that the stations able to offer the largest 
viewing audience in any given community will 
normally secure the principal network affilia- 
tions, many uhf stations which normally cannot 
provide a viewing audience comparable to those 
of their vhf competitors have been forced to 
operate on a marginal or submarginal basis or 
cease operation. 

10. Disparities which occur frequently be- 
tween the audiences which vhf and uhf stations 
are able to offer advertising program sponsors 
and national spot advertisers have resulted from 
the serious problem of receiver incompatibility 
and from limitations which have been experi- 
enced to date in the power of uhf transmitters 
and in the sensitivity and selectivity of uhf 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 91 



FCC TEXT: ALLOCATIONS 



receivers as well as the different propagation 
characteristics of the uhf band. 

11. While we are cognizant of the jurisdic- 
tional and practical limitations which restrict the 
extent to which the Commission can ameliorate 
the foregoing economic and technical conditions, 
we have endeavored to determine the realistic 
possibilities for improvement through revision 
of existing television allocations. It has become 
apparent that the construction and successful 
operation of a larger number of stations has 
been impeded in numerous markets by the ab- 
sence of a greater number of more nearly com- 
petitive facilities, despite the need for and the 
capacity of such markets to support a larger 
number of television outlets. Accordingly, in 
our evaluation of the numerous, diverse pro- 
posals before us, and in our determination of 
the course which in our judgment offers the 
best possibilities for both the immediate and 
long range expansion of the nation's television 
services, we have kept in mind the paramount 
need for more competitive services. 

Remedial Action Proposed by the Parties 

12. Some of the proposals submitted under 
this proceeding were based on the allocation of 
additional vhf spectrum space to television 
broadcasting and on the assignment of new vhf 
channels which this would make possible. Before 
this proceeding was initiated the Commission 
had undertaken negotiations with the Office of 
Defense Mobilization to ascertain whether any 
of the vhf frequencies allocated to governmental 
services might be made available for television 
broadcasting. The Office of Defense Mobiliza- 
tion made a careful study of the matter but 
concluded, in a report issued by that Office on 
April 13, 1956, that "national security require- 
ments and the needs of air navigation and air 
communications preclude the release for non- 
Government use of any of the very high fre- 
quencies now utilized by the Federal Govern- 
ment." Moreover, this Commission has con- 
cluded that it would not be practicable to 
obtain a significant number of additional vhf 
channels using vhf frequencies under our con- 
trol and now allocated to other services. In 
these circumstances, the proposals looking 
toward revision of the allocation plan on the 
basis of additional vhf channels must now be 
rejected. Moreover, the fact that additional 
vhf frequencies cannot be made available for 
television broadcasting precludes revision of the 
allocation plan looking toward an all-vhf tele- 
vision system. As the Commission has recog- 
nized from the outset, and has frequently re- 
affirmed, the 12 vhf channels alone are not 
adequate to make possible sufficient outlets for 
a fully competitive television system. 

.13. Other proposals before the Commission 
are based on the widespread use of additional 
vhf assignments, particularly in the larger 
markets, using the 12 vhf channels now avail- 
able, but at spacings substantially shorter than 
the present minimum spacings. While this 
method appears to offer limited possibilities for 
meeting present needs for more stations in some 
areas, careful analysis of these proposals dis- 
closes difficulties which raise very serious doubt 
that this method would adequately serve our 
long range objectives. Vhf stations at sub- 
standard spacings would reduce the service areas 
of existing vhf stations and create new interfer- 
ence areas within which satisfactory signals 
might not be received either from existing sta- 
tions or from the new stations. Our studies dis- 
close that, unless the existing minimum spacings 
were reduced very substantially, the number of 
additional outlets which could be provided over 
the country by this method would be very 



limited. Thus, in order to permit the construc- 
tion of a significant number of new vhf stations, 
it would be necessary to make very substantial 
in-roads in the service areas of existing stations. 
We recognize, as urged by parties to this pro- 
ceeding, that the interference problems might be 
limited to some extent by requiring the 
"squeezed-in" stations to employ lower heights 
and powers and directional antennas, and by 
the use of cross polarization. But we do not 
believe that the creation of numerous small vhf 
stations with very limited service areas would 
further the objectives of our nationwide tele- 
vision system. Similar proposals were submitted 
to the Commission when the present television 
allocation plan was under consideration. They 
were rejected, for reasons set out in the Sixth 
Report and Order (Paragraphs 136, et seq.). In 
our opinion those reasons remain essentially 
valid today. There is little likelihood, more- 
over, that even with the maximum possible 
utilization of vhf "squeeze-ins," assignments 
could be made available in sufficient numbers 
to accommodate the maximum number of tele- 
vision stations for which it may be expected 
there will eventually be economic support in 
the United States. Yet it is clear that the wide- 
spread use of new vhf assignments at sub- 
standard spacings would discourage the build- 
ing of additional uhf stations, and in many in- 
stances would reduce the opportunities for 
successful operation of uhf stations now on the 
air. Thus in most of the larger markets the as- 
signment of a vhf station at sub-standard spac- 
ings would operate to place an artificial ceiling 
on the number of stations which could event- 
ually be established. For all of these reasons 
we have been unable to find that the addition of 
new vhf assignments at sub-standard spacings 
would serve the public interest. For reasons 
which are discussed later, we believe, however, 
that it may be desirable to relax the present 
rules concerning minimum assignment separa- 
tions to the extent necessary to permit the 
assignment of additional channels which do not 
meet the separation from the new city, provided 
all separations will be met from the new trans- 
mitter on these channels. 

14. Some of the proposals before us advocate 
the deintermixture of vhf and uhf channel as- 
signments in order to more nearly equalize com- 
petitive opportunities in individual markets 
while at the same time utilizing both the vhf 
and uhf bands in the nationwide television 
system. Citing competitive difficulties of uhf 
broadcasters, particularly in markets which are 
served by two or more satisfactory vhf signals, 
the proponents of deintermixture have advocated 
the elimination of some or all of the vhf channel 
assignments in designated cities. It is contended 
that this would improve the opportunities of the 
local uhf broadcasters to obtain, or in some 
cases to retain sufficient network programming 
and national advertising revenue to support suc- 
cessful station operation which, it is alleged, 
would be impossible for a good many uhf sta- 
tions obliged to compete with two or more vhf 
broadcasters. The deintermixture proposals 
also envisage, at least in some instances, the 
transfer of some vhf channels to other cities 
where they could be used to increase the number 
of local vhf services. Thus, deintermixture has 
the dual aspect of reducing or eliminating vhf 
assignments in some communities and of in- 
creasing the number of vhf assignments in 
others. 

15. It does not appear, however, that dein- 
termixture at this stage would be practicable in 
a sufficient number of communities representing 
a sufficiently large segment of the total popula- 
tion to provide significantly enhanced oppor- 



tunities for the fuller utilization of the uhf 
channels on a nationwide basis. We believe that 
in some types of situations, which are discussed 
later, deintermixture merits careful considera- 
tion as a means of increasing the opportunity 
for effective competition among a greater num- 
ber of stations in certain individual areas. Most 
of the deintermixture proposals 2 have been con- 
fined to communities where uhf stations com- 
menced operating before the advent of one, 
and in some cases before the advent of a second 
vhf service, and where a high percentage of re- 
ceivers in the hands of the local residents can 
receive uhf signals. There are serious obstacles 
to a more extensive nationwide program of de- 
intermixture at this stage. Thus there is little 
support for the elimination of vhf assignments 
in areas with little uhf set saturation. In other 
instances the elimination of local vhf channel 
assignments would not accomplish effective 
deintermixture owing to the local reception from 
vhf stations located in neighboring communities. 
In still other cases the elimination of local vhf 
assignments would be impracticable at this 
stage owing to the fact that substantial "white 
areas" would be created. It seems doubtful for 
these reasons that the elimination of vhf chan- 
nel assignments would be practicable at this 
stage in a sufficient number of communities to 
encourage significantly increased nationwide use 
of the uhf band. Nor would this technique alone 
satisfy the need for increasing the number of 
outlets in many markets, both large and small, 
which are at present inadequately served, and 
which accordingly offer only limited opportuni- 
ties for competition among stations, among net- 
works, and among other programs and revenue 
sources. 

16. Because deintermixture, alone, cannot 
solve the entire problem, we have found it nec- 
essary to consider additional means for making 
possible the full utilization of the uhf band for 
television broadcasting. As early as 1945 3 , recog- 
nizing the inadequacy of 13 vhf channels for a 
fully developed nationwide television system, 
Commission policy has looked toward the exten- 
sive use of the uhf band for television broad- 
casting. The expectation that ultimately the 
major part of television broadcasting would be 
carried on in the uhf band was implicit in the 
allocation, in the Sixth Report and Order, of 
70 uhf channels to supplement 12 previously 
available vhf channels. But so far this expecta- 
tion has not been realized owing to difficulties 
which none of the proposals already discussed 
can sufficiently overcome. One of the pro- 
posals whose consideration has been recom- 
mended in this proceeding and has been advo- 
cated in the past by industry representatives in 
submisssions to the Commission and to Con- 
gress, should be examined. That is the proposal 
to shift all television broadcasting in the United 
States, or in a substantial portion of the country, 
to the ultra-high frequency band. 

17. Although it would be premature at this 
stage for the Commission to adopt final con- 
clusions concerning the feasibility of trans- 
ferring television to the uhf band throughout 
the United States, or, alternatively, in a major 
portion of the country, we believe that our effort 
to find a solution to the nationwide television 
allocation problem should not be concluded 
without a careful and thorough exploration of 
this approach. Another major consideration is 
involved. As discussed later in more detail, 



2 A petition filed on April 18, 1955, by Mr. Albert 
J. Balusek of San Antonio, Tex., proposed that 
the Commission deintermix uhf and vhf channel 
assignments in all communities throughout the 
United States. We are obliged to deny this peti- 
tion for the reasons set out in paragraph 15. 
f Report of Allocations from 25,000 kc to 30,000,- 
000 kc, May 25, 1945, Docket No. 6651. 



Page 92 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



there are growing indications that the needs of 
other services for additional spectrum space are 
increasing rapidly. The fact that the lower part 
of the vhf spectrum seems well suited to their 
needs indicates the likelihood that it will be 
possible to make effective use of the vhf fre- 
quencies now allocated to television, for other 
non-broadcast services. 

18. If suitable means could be found to 
overcome the difficulties inherent in so major 
a frequency reallocation as moving television 
to uhf, and if uhf could be sufficiently developed 
to permit the elimination of vhf channels with- 
out loss of service, a number of basic advantages 
would result. All stations would be able to 
compete on a much more nearly comparable 
basis technically, since there is much less dis- 
parity between the lower and upper uhf channels 
than between the vhf and uhf television chan- 
nels. Thus the coverage of competing stations 
would be much more comparable than at 
present, and competitive opportunities among 
broadcasters, among networks and among other 
program and revenue sources would be con- 
siderably enhanced. It may be expected that 
this would encourage the building of numerous 
additional stations which would bring a first 
local service to some communities and much 
needed additional services in others. These 
achievements would be aided by the fact that 
broadcasting in a single band would, after a 
suitable transition period, eliminate the crucial 
problem of receiver incompatibility. As com- 
pared with alternative solutions which iiave 
been considered, the use of the uhf band exclu- 
sively would raise the ceiling of the maximum 
number of television stations which could 
eventually be built and successfully operated. 
And, as stated above, after the discontinuance 
of vhf television broadcasting, additional vhf 
frequencies would be made available to meet 
the growing needs of other services for vhf 
spectrum space. 

19. Before it would be possible, however, 
to achieve these impressive advantages it would 
be necessary to find solutions for numerous 
problems which a transition to all uhf television 
would involve. These problems fall into several 
major groups. The first group relates to the 
technical transmission and reception potentiali- 
ties of uhf. It will be necessary to ascertain 
the extent to which uhf transmission and recep- 
tion can be improved, in order to make a 
realistic determination as to whether conversion 
to all-uhf television throughout the United 
States or in a major portion of the country 
would or would not result in the loss of services 
available now or potentially available with the 
use of vhf channels. In order to ascertain the 
capacity of uhf transmitting and receiving equip- 
ment to render satisfactory service without the 
concurrent use of the vhf band for television 
broadcasting, the Commission believes that a 
program of expedited research and develop- 
ment should be launched without delay with the 
object of achieving the maximum possible in- 
crease in the range of, and the reduction of the 
shadow areas of uhf stations. This research and 
development program should be concentrated 
on: 

(a) Uhf transmitters, with emphasis on in- 

creased transmitting power and the 
feasibility of the use of such techniques 
as uhf boosters and satellites. 

(b) Receivers and receiving antennas, with 
the object of increasing the sensitivity 
of and reducing the noise factors of re- 
ceivers; and improving their selectivity 
in order to permit the reassignment of 
uhf channels with a minimum number 
of restrictions on station separations. 

20. The Commission will cooperate fully with 

# 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



all interested groups in organizing the orderly 
conduct of the foregoing research and develop- 
ment program. While it would be premature 
to anticipate the results of this program, the 
Commission believes that considerable encour- 
agement is offered by recent notable advances 
in increasing the power of uhf transmitters and 
in tubes for improving the characteristics of uhf 
receivers. Notwithstanding the disadvantages 
frequently associated with uhf broadcasting 
there are some respects in which the uhf band 
is superior to the vhf channels allocated to 
television. Uhf reception, for one thing, is freer 
than vhf from interference caused by local noise 
generators such as ignition systems, electrical 
appliances and switches, and is less susceptible 
to interference due to multipath reflections. 
Also, if future developments result in the pro- 
duction of single-band uhf receivers they could 
be simpler in design, less costly, and more 
efficient than present vhf-only or combination 
uhf-vhf receivers, owing to the fact that the 
ratio between the top and bottom uhf television 
frequencies is smaller than between the top and 
bottom vhf frequencies now allocated to televi- 
sion. The Commission believes, therefore, that 
despite disappointments that have been experi- 
enced during this initial four-year period of de- 
velopment of uhf transmitting and receiving 
equipment, it would be erroneous to base our 
policies on an assumption that uhf transmission 
and reception is not susceptible of significant 
improvement. On the other hand, additional 
facts and data are needed in order to make a 
sound determination as to whether the fullest 
possible exploitation of uhf's technical poten- 
tialities will enable uhf to render a service which 
will justify elimination of vhf broadcasting in a 
major part or throughout the United States. 

21. The answer to this question will not de- 
pend on whether all the disparities between uhf 
and vhf transmission and reception can be com- 
pletely eliminated. We recognize that some 
differences inhere in the essential characteristics 
of the two frequency bands and that it may 
never be possible to eliminate them entirely. 
The problem is not, however, whether these dis- 
parities can be totally eliminated, but whether 
uhf transmission and reception can be perfected 
sufficiently to enable an all uhf system to render 
service to the public at least as good as or 
better than the service that can be provided to 
the public under the present system. It may very 
well be that owing to the opportunities which 
a one band system with 70 channels will open 
up for increased competition, and for the con- 
struction and operation of a greater number of 
stations and successful operation of more net- 
works and other program sources, a one band 
system would permit more communities to have 
local service and would provide a larger number 
of multiple services to a greater portion of the 
population than would be possible with the com- 
bined use of the uhf and vhf bands. This may 
be possible despite certain advantages in the use 
of vhf frequencies for television broadcasting. 
The critical factor is that there is an inadequate 
number of these frequencies, and the use of the 
12 vhf channels has discouraged the utilization 
of more than a fraction of the uhf assignments 
which were made available for television broad- 
casting in 1952. 

22. When we learn the results of the sug- 
gested program of uhf research and develop- 
ment, we will be better able to ascertain the 
full practical capabilities of uhf. On that basis 
we will then be able to evaluate uhf s capacity 
to supplant vhf broadcasting without loss of 
service. We will also be in a better position 
to determine whether uhf alone would render 
adequate service throughout the country, or 



whether it would be necessary to confine all-uhf 
television to areas, such as east of the Mississippi 
River, where' owing to the greater population 
density, and the larger number of cities able to 
support stations, service areas need not be as 
large as in the less densely populated areas to 
the west. 

23. The second major group of problems in- 
volved in an all-uhf television system concerns 
the need to establish methods and timing for 
transition from the present system which will 
minimize cost and dislocation to the public and 
to the television industry. It would appear that 
a transition period would have to be sufficiently 
long to cover the useful life of vhf-only re- 
ceivers in the hands of the public, and to permit 
the amortization, over a reasonable period, of 
vhf transmitting equipment whose use would be 
discontinued when vhf broadcasting would be 
terminated in designated portions of the United 
States. One method which may merit considera- 
tion is to require vhf stations to broadcast simul- 
taneously on uhf channels during all or some 
part of the transition period. It would seem 
probable that if it should be decided to go to 
an all-uhf system, the announcement of a deci- 
sion that vhf broadcasting would be discontinued 
on a fixed future date, coupled with interim 
simultaneous uhf broadcasting by vhf stations, 
would lay the necessary basis for discontinuance 
of the manufacture of vhf-only receivers. 

24. The problem of getting uhf-equipped 
sets into the hands of the public is not, how- 
ever, subject to complete control, under existing 
law, by either the Commission or the industry. 
For even if it were to be determined that on a 
mass production basis improved all-channel sets 
can be developed at only a moderate cost differ- 
ential from vhf-only sets, the forces of price 
competition in the industry are such as to 
magnify the effects of such slight differentials 
and in the absence of some additional spur or 
protection, to have the cheaper, less-complete 
set drive out the all-channel sets. Any private 
agreement among manufacturers to manufacture 
only uhf-equipped sets would run the risk of 
violating the anti-trust laws. And in view of this 
fact, and the public's reluctance to spend addi- 
tional sums in anticipation of future develop- 
ments in the television art, we believe it may be 
essential for the Congress, contemporaneously 
without explorations of the technical problems 
of uhf operation, to examine the advisability of 
legislation to relieve the situation. Such legisla- 
tion might take the form of special tax relief, 
such as that already suggested, to equate all- 
channel receiver costs with those of vhf-only 
sets, or perhaps more drastic remedies such as 
the prohibition of the shipment in interstate 
commerce of other than uhf-equipped receivers 
might be found to be necessary. We can make 
no definite recommendations at this time as to 
specific legislation; we do believe, however, that 
this is an important facet of the overall problem 
which cannot be overlooked. 

25. For all the foregoing reasons the Com- 
mission is convinced that it should now under- 
take a thorough, searching analysis of the possi- 
bilities for improving and expanding the nation- 
wide television system through the exclusive use 
of the uhf band throughout or in a major por- 
tion of the United States. In order, however, 
to lay the basis for the formulation of a definite 
plan or proposal in a form suitable for con- 
sideration in a formal rule making proceeding, 
it will be necessary first to obtain facts and 
data relating to the basic problems, discussed in 
paragraphs 19 through 24 concerning uhfs 
capacity to provide a complete television service 
without the concomitant use of vhf channels, 
and the best means of effecting a transition to 

July 2, 1956 • Page 93 



an all-uhf system. The Commission will wel- 
come the submission of comments and data on 
these problems by all interested parties. The 
comments should refer to "FCC Inquiry Into 
the Feasibility of Transferring Television Broad- 
casting to the Uhf Band," and should be sub- 
mitted, in an original and 14 copies, by Oct. 1, 
1956. The Commission will decide what further 
proceedings will be appropriate after consider- 
ing those comments. 

26. Concerning the first group of problems 
relating to the technical performance of uhf 
transmitters and receivers we believe that it 
will be necessary to achieve some progress with 
the suggested program of research and develop- 
ment before it will be useful to establish an 
extensive record on these subjects. The Com- 
mission will, however, accept any comments 
which interested parties may feel it may be 
useful to submit on this aspect of the matter 
at this time. We will especially welcome com- 
ments at this time concerning the most effective 
methods for conducting and expediting this sug- 
gested research and development program. 

27. An additional group of problems con- 
cerns the question of the most efficient utiliza- 
tion of the vhf frequencies now allocated to 
television broadcasting, taking into account both 
the problems of television allocations and the 
uses to which these frequencies might be put 
by other services. It would be premature to 
examine the latter uses in detail, at this stage, 
since even assuming the successful disposition 
of the technical problems of an all-uhf system, 
developments in the interim may considerably 
alter the present circumstances of the other 
services. At the same time, it may be useful to 
note briefly several developments which indicate 
growing need of additional space in the vhf por- 
tion of the spectrum for other services. 

28. Recently there has been considerable de- 
velopment of techniques employing ionospheric 
scatter from point-to-point or fixed communica- 
tions. It is in use outside the United States and 
appears to offer possibilities for domestic use 
and for international use between the United 
States and other countries. The useful frequency 
range is between about 30 and 60 mc. As the 
sunspot cycle advances widespread interference 
is caused to the mobile services which are now 
using the same frequencies for domestic opera- 
tion. Whether the use of ionospheric scatter 
circuits is limited to foreign areas or in the event 
that there will be domestic demands for this 
service, the question is raised whether fre- 
quencies in the range of 30 to 60 mc should be 
set aside for this service within the next 5 to 10 
years. 

29. The conditions of use and the character- 
istics of radio systems employed by the land 
mobile services indicate that the lower vhf 
spectrum may be well adapted to their needs. 
Many of these services are related to trading 
areas in much the same manner as the broadcast 
service. Thus they have need for substantially 
the same coverage areas. However, only the 
base transmitting and receiving antennas can be 
raised above rooftop and treetop levels, and in 
general the base station uses lower antennas 
and lesser powers than broadcast stations. The 
governing factor, however, is the severely re- 
stricted powers and antenna heights which are 
available to mobile units. Only in exceptional 
cases do they operate from clear sites, and it is 
imperative that for longer ranges they have 
frequencies suited to their needs. The lower 
vhf frequencies are less affected by hills, struc- 
tures and vegetation. They also permit longer 
mobile antennas and more sensitive receivers. 
These factors indicate the desirability of con- 
sidering the allocation of lower vhf frequencies 
to the land mobile services. 

30. It is evident that the need and demand 



for more accommodation for land mobile serv- 
ices has been increasing substantially in the re- 
cent past and promises to increase further as 
the industrial uses of radio continue to develop. 
These factors raise basic questions concerning 
spectrum allocation which go further than the 
requirements of television broadcasting alone, 
and which take into account the rising needs of 
other services. Thus the question of the transfer 
of television broadcasting to vhf has the dual 
aspect of the possible improvement it may pro- 
vide in the opportunity for achieving the goals 
of the nationwide television system upon the 
one hand and of accommodating expanding 
needs and requirements of industry on the other. 

Interim Action 

31. There remains the problem of interim 
action which should be taken pending resolution 
of the long range problems already discussed. 
Since some years would be required in any event 
for the full implementation of an all-uhf system, 
the Commission believes that steps should be 
taken in the meantime to improve the oppor- 
tunities for effective competition among a 
greater number of stations. As already indi- 
cated, a basic choice in many markets at this 
time lies between the elimination of vhf channel 
assignments to create improved opportunities for 
uhf broadcasting and, alternatively, the assign- 
ment of additional local vhf channels. Because 
of the widely varying circumstances in indi- 
vidual markets and the numerous factors which 
bear on the choice of techniques in any indi- 
vidual community or area, it is not possible to 
formulate rigid criteria whose perfunctory appli- 
cation to individual cases will automatically 
indicate the course which would best serve the 
public interest in each community during the 
interim period. We have concluded, however, 
after extensive review of all the proposals which 
have been submitted to us for the elimination 
or addition of commercial vhf assignments, that 
the following considerations will have important 
bearing on decisions in specific communities or 
areas. In markets with one or more commercial 
vhf assignments, the merits of proposals to elim- 
inate a vhf commercial assignment would de- 
pend to a large extent on such factors as: 

1. Whether significant numbers of people 
would lack service as a result of the elim- 
ination of the vhf channel. 

2. Whether one or more uhf stations are 
operating in the area. 

3. Whether a reasonably high proportion of 
the sets in use can receive uhf signals. 

4. Whether the terrain is reasonably favorable 
for uhf coverage. 

5. Whether, taking into account all the local 
circumstances, the elimination of a vhf 
channel would be consistent with the ob- 
jective of improving the opportunities for 
effective competition among a greater 
number of stations. 

The desirability of assigning a first vhf chan- 
nel or of adding an additional vhf channel would 
depend principally upon: 

1. Whether it is possible to locate the new 
transmitter so as to meet minimum trans- 
mitter spacings. 

2. Whether, in cases where it is necessary 
to move the channel from another city, 
there is greater need for the channel in the 
area to which it is proposed to be assigned. 

3. Whether the addition of a new vhf assign- 
ment would be consistent with the objec- 
tive of improving the opportunities for 
effective competition among a greater 
number of stations. 

32. In appropriate instances it may be de- 
sirable, in order to attain the objectives stated 
in the preceding paragraph, to add an additional 
vhf assignment which meets all requirements of 
the present rules with the exception that the 



minimum spacing from the city where the new 
assignment is proposed would not be met. It 
would be feasible, however, in these instances, 
by appropriate location of the new transmitter, 
to meet all transmitter spacing requirements. 
Since it is the spacing from the transmitter that 
is critical, we believe, that it will be in the public 
interest to relax the present rules in order to 
permit new assignments that can be utilized 
within reasonable distance from the city in con- 
formity with the minimum transmitter spacing 
requirement. In this way additional service can 
be provided without departing from the en- 
gineering standards. 

Implementation of Interim Revisions 
of the Table of Assignments 

33. This proceeding has served the purpose 
for which it was instituted, i.e., determination 
of the basic lines on which revisions of the 
existing television allocation plan should be 
considered. It can therefore now be terminated. 
We announced in the Notice of Proposed Rule 
Making adopted on Nov. 10, 1955, that after 
this determination had been made we would 
proceed to the consideration of proposals for 
such channel reassignments as might be made 
in conformity with the general policies adopted 
herein. 

34. Accordingly, we are adopting today a 
number of Notices of Proposed Rule Making in 
which we will consider a series of proposed 
channel reassignments which appear to merit 
consideration in conformity with the objectives 
outlined in this Report and Order. For ex- 
ample, in a number of communities, including 
Madison* and Elmira*, we are proposing to 
delete a vhf channel or reserve it for educa- 
tional use. It appears on the basis of the facts 
before us that such action offers reasonable 
prospect for improving the opportunities for 
effective competition among a greater number 
of stations in these areas. In other communities, 
such as Fresno** and Peoria**, we are propos- 
ing to shift vhf channels to other communities, 
which would have the added advantage of 
making additional comparable facilities avail- 
able in vhf markets. In several other areas, 
such as New Orleans*** and Albany***, it 
appears that similar objectives can be achieved 
by deleting or shifting one of the two vhf chan- 
nels assigned in the area. 

35. In communities such as Charleston and 
Duluth-Superior, which have two vhf channels 
assigned and no uhf stations in operation, we 
find that it is possible to add a third vhf channel 
by "drop-in" or by shifting an unused educa- 
tional assignment for which there appears to be 
no realistic prospect of early use. In Miami****, 
which already has three commercial vhf assign- 
ments, we are proposing to add a fourth which 
it appears can be accomplished in accordance 
with minimum transmitter spacing requirements. 
We believe this course of action is more 
meritorious than deletion of two or all vhf 
channels from Miami, as some petitioners and 
parties to this proceeding have proposed. Where 
a fourth vhf channel can be employed without 
violating our engineering standards, deletion of 
vhf channels would not appear to be warranted. 

36. In some markets such as Toledo, where 
there are only two commercial vhf assignments 
and no uhf stations operating, we find that 
despite the apparent capacity of such markets 
to support additional stations, it is not possible 

* Chairman McConnaughey and Commissioners 
Doerfer and Mack dissented from this proposed 
rule making. 

** Commissioners Doerfer and Mack dissented 
from this proposed rule making. 
*** Chairman McConnaughey and Commissioners 
Doerfer and Mack dissented from this proposed 
rule making. Commissioners Webster, Bartley 
and Lee concurring but would propose the dele- 
tion of ch. 6 also. 

**** Commissioners Webster and Mack dissented 
from this proposed rule making. 



Page 94 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



to assign an additional vhf channel because there 
are none available which would meet minimum 
transmitter spacings. Nor would it be prac- 
ticable to encourage the expansion of local 
services on locally assigned uhf channels by 
eliminating a local vhf assignment because, apart 
from the absence of significant uhf conversion 
in the area, the reception of signals from vhf 
cities located elsewhere (in this case, Detroit) 
would make it doubtful that effective deinter- 
mixture could be achieved. 

37. Parties interested in these proceedings will 
have full opportunity to submit comments in 
support of or in opposition to these proposals, 
and to submit counterproposals. The proposals 
put out for rule making at this time do not 
cover all the amendments to the present Table 
of Assignments which have been proposed in 
petitions now before us. We will endeavor to 
act on all petitions as rapidly as possible, includ- 
ing those already before us which have not yet 
been acted on and in those on which rule mak- 
ing proceedings have been initiated but not yet 
concluded. Parties desiring to file petitions for 
additional or alternative amendments to the 
Table of Assignments may do so. 

38. In order to assist the Commission in 
evaluating proposals for channel reassignments 
which involve the removal of an existing vhf 
assignment for which an application is on file 
or a construction permit has been granted, it is 
requested that the parties furnish data, in ac- 
cordance with the procedure set out in para- 
graphs 39 and 40, showing the service of all sta- 
tions in the area involved. 

39. As the Commission pointed out in the 
Sixth Report and Order and other documents, 
there is no available means for predicting pre- 
cisely the service areas of a specific television 
station which will take into account time varia- 
tions and variations in location, with particular 
reference to uneven terrain. Propagation data 
gathered since the Sixth Report and Order are 
now available. These latest data, as analyzed 
by the Commission's staff and others, should be 
used, since they improve somewhat the predic- 
tions which can now be made in the average 
case. The new data and methods for employing 
them are set out in Appendix A attached to this 
Report and Order. 

40. The data supplied should be based on the 
following assumptions: 

(1) In computing coverage, stations should 
be assumed to be operating with max- 
imum power at 1000 ft. above average 
terrain, with the transmitter located in 
the center of the principal community, 
except where the minimum transmitter 
separations proposed require transmitter 
location elsewhere. 

(2) 1000 ft. antenna height above average 
terrain should be used for all pertinent 
directions. 

(3) Service should be drawn for the limit 
of the Grade B contour as limited by 
noise or interference, as the case may be. 

(4) The extent of Grade B service should be 
computed in accordance with the tables 
set out in Appendix A. 

(5) Only co-channel interference need be 
considered. 

(6) Simple station method of interference 
should be employed, i.e., the station caus- 
ing the greatest penetration is assumed 
to mask the interference of other stations. 

(7) In computing interference or service, all 
stations presently on the air or author- 
ized, and pending applications, should be 
taken into account, whether uhf or vhf. 
However, where a station that is not 
yet operating is considered, this fact 
should be indicated. 

If the parties desire, data based on other 



assumptions may be submitted in addition to the 
foregoing. 

41. In a Notice of Proposed Rule Making 
adopted lune 22, 1955 (Docket No. 11433, 
FCC 55-705), the Commission requested com- 
ments on a proposal to raise the maximum 
power of uhf television stations from 1,000 kw 
to 5,000 kw, and to substitute new curves in 
Figures 3 and 4 of Section 3.699 of the Rules 
governing reduction of power for antenna 
heights exceeding 2000 ft. In a Further Report 
and Order adopted on Dec. 14, 1955, the fore- 
going rule making proceeding was incorporated 
as part of the general television allocation pro- 
ceeding under Docket No. 11532, and the pro- 
posal is accordingly before us for review in the 
instant proceeding. After careful examination 
of the comments which have been submitted in 
support of and in opposition to these proposals 
the Commission has concluded, in the light of 
the decisions reached in this proceeding, that the 
public interest would be served by increasing 
the maximum power of uhf stations to 5000 kw. 
It has accordingly decided to amend the relevant 
rules, including the curves already mentioned, 
in Figures 3 and 4 of Section 3.699. Equip- 
ment is now available and in use which yields 
effective radiated power of 1000 kw for uhf sta- 
tions. Encouraging experiments have been con- 
ducted with uhf transmissions at 4500 kw and 
even higher power. The increase at this time 
in the maximum power authorized for uhf sta- 
tions seems particularly appropriate in view of 
the importance which is attached to the re- 
search and development program already dis- 
cussed. 

42. In a Further Report and Order adopted 
Nov. 30, 1955 (Docket Nos. 11181 and 11532, 
FCC 55-1198), the Commission brought within 
this general television allocation proceeding the 
proposal to increase the antenna height at which 
maximum power could be authorized for vhf 
television stations in Zone I. Previously, on 
July 20, 1955 (Report and Order, Docket No. 
11181, FCC 55-802), the Commission had an- 
nounced the adoption of an amendment to Sec- 
tion 3.614(b) of the rules which would permit 
vhf television stations in Zone I to use maxi- 
mum power at antenna heights up to 1250 ft., 
instead of up to 1000 ft. as provided in the 
rules. The effective date for that amendment 
was designated as Aug. 31. 1955. This effec- 
tive date was subsequently extended in a series 
of Orders issued prior to Nov. 30, 1955, at 
which time the Commission vacated the Report 
and Order of July 20, 1955, and made the record 
in Docket No. 11181 part of this general tele- 
vision allocation proceeding. The rule making 
proposal under the former Docket No. 11181 
is accordingly before us for decision. 

43. In re-examining this proposal we have 
again carefully reviewed the comments, sup- 
porting and opposing the change. We also have 
considered a number of petitions for reconsid- 
eration or for stay of our Report and Order of 
July 20, 1955 (Docket No. 11181).' We also 
have considered the issues concerning maxi- 
mum antenna heights and powers for vhf sta- 
tions in Zone 1 in the light of the conclusions 
reached in this proceeding concerning the meas- 
ures which will best facilitate the building and 
operation of greater numbers of television sta- 
tions in both large and small markets. This 
objective is paramount, and furnishes the basis 
for our conclusion that it would be undesirable 
to alter the antenna height and power maxima 
at this time. As we pointed out in our Report 

4 Filed by Elm City Broadcasting Corp., The 
Air Transport Assn. of America, The Ultra 
High Frequency Coordinating Committee, Grey- 
lock Broadcasting Co. (WMGT). Springfield Tele- 
vision Broadcasting Corp. (WWLP), Plains Tele- 
vision Corp. (WICS), The Helm Coal Co. (WNOW- 
TV), Rossmoyne Corp. (WCMB-TV), Southern 
Connecticut and Long Island Television Co. 
(WICC-TV). 



and Order of July 20, 1955, there were cogent 
reasons for rejecting, in the Sixth Report and 
Order, proposals to permit all stations to use 
maximum power at 2000 ft., irrespective of lo- 
cation. In that document the Commission ad- 
verted to the lower separations in Zone I, the 
shorter distances between cities, and the need 
for more data on operations over 1000 ft. The 
pattern of vhf stations in Zone I is now well 
established on the basis of the height and power 
rules adopted in 1952 when the Sixth Report 
and Order was issued. 

44. The comments and data submitted in the 
instant proceeding also indicate that to some ex- 
tent, the overlap of service areas tends to di- 
minish the opportunities for the building and 
successful operation of a larger number of sta- 
tions, both in the vhf and uhf bands, in smaller 
communities neighboring the larger metropoli- 
tan areas. The power increases sought for Zone 
I would tend to augment these effects of over- 
lapping of service areas. In these circumstances, 
taking into account the objective of facilitating 
the construction and operation of a larger num- 
ber of television stations, the Commission has 
come to the conclusion that it would be prefer- 
able not to adopt even the compromise increase 
contemplated in our Report and Order of July 
20, 1955. In reaching this decision, the Com- 
mission has borne in mind not only the possible 
impact of the change on uhf stations in Zone I, 
but also the needless burdens which would be 
thrust on vhf stations, which would be faced 
with the alternatives of sustaining increase in- 
terference from co-channel stations taking ad- 
vantage of the proposed rule change, or of in- 
creasing the heights of their own antennas in 
order to offset it. Owing to the added cost, local 
zoning restrictions and air space considerations, 
not all vhf stations in Zone I would find it pos- 
sible to increase their antenna heights. Thus 
this proposal would tend to unbalance the estab- 
lished pattern of vhf service in Zone I, a result 
which would not be justified by the extension 
of service areas which the amendment might 
make possible in a relatively few cases. 

45. In our Memorandum Opinion and Order 
adopted Dec. 14, 1955, we listed five petitions 
which related directly to the matters under re- 
view in the general television allocation and 
which we announced we would, accordingly, 
consider in these proceedings. It is now appro- 
priate to consider these petitions in the light of 
the decisions reached herein. The petition filed 
April 18. 1955, by Albert J. Balusek of San 
Antonio. Tex., has already been disposed of. 
The remaining four are dealt with in the suc- 
ceeding paragraphs. 

46. On June 21. 1955. the Uhf Industry Co- 
ordinating Committee requested that the Com- 
mission amend the rules so as to permit the 
authorization of vhf stations on a case-to-case 
basis at lower separations than are permitted at 
present. Whether such authorizations were 
processed on a case-to-case basis or on the basis 
of a general reduction of minimum separations, 
the Commission has concluded, for the reasons 
already given, that the authorization of addi- 
tional vhf stations at sub-standard transmitter 
spacings would not be desirable. 

47. On Oct. 17. 1955, the Ultra High Fre- 
quency Industry Coordinating Committee filed 
a separate petition requesting, inter alia, that 
the Commission consider the television alloca- 
tions problem under a broad rule making pro- 
ceeding. The instant rule making proceeding 
corresponds with that requested by the peti- 
tioner. The Ultra High Frequency Industry Co- 
ordinating Committee also requested the de- 
ferment of authorizations or modifications of 
authorizations which would increase intermix- 
ture pending the conduct of the general proceed- 
ing. That portion of the petition is now moot. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 95 



since we are now terminating this proceeding. 

48. On Oct. 7, 1955, the American Broad- 
casting Co. filed a petition requesting the dein- 
termixture of some communities, the reduction 
of vhf separations and other revisions to the 
present rules. These proposals of the American 
Broadcasting Co. have been superseded by com- 
ments filed under the instant proceeding. It is 
not necessary, therefore, to give separate con- 
sideration to this petition. 

49. On Nov. 9, 1955, Scharfeld and Baron 
of Washington, D. C, filed a petition proposing 
that channel assignments be made on the basis 
of individual applications rather than under a 
fixed Table of Assignment. The Commission 
has given careful consideration to this proposal, 
but is not persuaded that it would be in the 
public interest to abandon the Table of Assign- 
ments at this time. Before the Sixth Report 
and Order was adopted the Commission con- 
sidered proposals to assign television channels 
on the basis of individual applications. It was 
decided, however, for reasons set out in that 
document, that it would be preferable to estab- 
lish a table of assignments subject to modifica- 
tion through rule making proceedings. Although 
not all the reasons given at that time are 
applicable now to the full extent they were in 
1952, when a large backlog of applications 
would have rendered the application basis 
almost unmanageable, the Commission hesitates 
to discard the Table and thereby incur delays 
which may occur in cases where applications 
propose conflicting assignments. Moreover, re- 
tention of the present system of fixed assign- 
ments subject to modification in rule making 
proceedings is desirable for implementation of 
the policies adopted in this Report and Order. 

50. In our further Report and Order adopted 
in this proceedings on Nov. 30, 1955, the Com- 
mission gave notice that it would consider herein 
the petition which Northern Pacific Tv Corp. 
of Spokane, Wash., filed on Nov. 7, 1954, re- 
questing the amendment of Section 3.614(b) 
of the Rules so as to permit stations operating 
on Channels 2-6 in Zone II to operate with 
maximum power of 100 kw irrespective of an- 
tenna height. On the basis of careful considera- 
tion of this proposal the Commission has con- 
cluded that it would not serve the public in- 
terest to remove the maximum limitations set 
out in the present rules at the present time. 
The basic considerations which apply here are 
similar to those already discussed in paragraphs 
43 and 44, above, relating to the proposal to 
increase the antenna height at which vhf sta- 
tions in Zone I are permitted to use maximum 
power. 

51. In accordance with the decision reached 
on the proposal to increase the maximum power 
of uhf stations to 5,000 kw, discussed in para- 
graph 41, above, IT IS ORDERED, that effec- 
tive Aug. 1, 1956, Part 3 of the Commission's 
Rules is amended as follows: 

A. Section 3.614(b) is amended by deleting 
in the Table the expression "30 dbk (1,000 
kw)" and substituting therefor "37 dbk 
(5,000 kw)." 

B. Section 3.699 is amended by the deletion 
of Figures 3 and 4 and the substitution 
therefor of the attached Figures 3 and 4. 
[Editor's Note: Figures 3 and 4 not repro- 
duced in this text.] 

52. Authority for the foregoing amendment 
is contained in Sections 303(a), (b), (c), (e), 
(f), (g), (h) and (r) and 4(i) of the Communi- 
cations Act of 1934, as amended. 

53. In accordance with the conclusions 
reached herein, IT IS ORDERED, that this 
proceeding IS TERMINATED, including that 
portion of this proceeding concerning amend- 
ment of the rules governing maximum antenna 



heights and powers in Zone I, which was for- 
merly considered under Docket No. 11181. 

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS 
COMMISSION* 

Mary lane Morris, 

Secretary. 

Adopted: June 25, 1956. 
Released: June 26, 1956. 

* See attached concurring statements of Com- 
missioners Hyde, Webster, Bartley and Mack. 

* See attached dissenting statement of Commis- 
sioner Doerfer. 

NOTE: Rules changes herein will be included in 
Amendment No. 3-16. 



APPENDIX A 



The accompanying tables, which have been 
drawn up on the basis of new propagation 
data, 1 provide the basis for determining the 
Grade B service contours of television stations 
in the presence of noise and co-channel inter- 
ference. 

In order that rapid determinations may be 
reached, an abbreviated method is to be used 
in employing the tables. In constructing the 
tables it has been assumed that a contour 
which reflects the effect of each interfering sta- 
tion separately will approximate that derived 
from computing the simultaneous effect of 
several interfering signals since the interference 
from the nearest station will predominate. 

The tables are based on new minimum local 
field intensities of 35, 44 and 53 dbu in the 
presence of noise for low vhf, high vhf and 
uhf, respectively, and on a maximum receiving 
antenna discrimination of 6 db for vhf and 13 
db for uhf. These new figures are employed 
in light of experience and improvement in the 
art since the Sixth Report and Order. They 
represent the following changes from the values 
employed at the time of the Sixth Report and 
Order: A 6 db improvement in the receiver 
noise figure for low vhf, a 4 db improvement 
in the receiver noise figure and a 3 db improve- 
ment in the receiving antenna gain for high 
vhf, and a 5 db improvement in the receiver 
noise figure and a 2 db improvement in trans- 
mission line loss for uhf. Maximum power for 
vhf stations, 1,000 kw for uhf stations and 
1,000-ft. transmitting antenna heights have been 
assumed in compiling the tables. All of the 
data underlying the tables are based on the 
foregoing assumptions and on 90% service 
time probability. 

Table I gives the distance of a television sta- 
tion's signal as limited by noise for 50% and 
70% of the locations for the low band vhf, high 
band vhf and uhf in the presence of noise only. 

Table II gives the minimum spacing between 
co-channel stations in order that their Grade B 
contours will be limited by noise only. When 
stations are spaced at distances less than those 
indicated, their service areas will be limited by 
the resulting interference. 

Table III gives the point, on a direct line be- 
tween stations, at which Grade B service will 
be limited by co-channel interference on the 
basis of the single station method of computa- 
tion. 2 Linear interpolations may be used for 
distances between those listed. 

Table IV gives the radii of the interfering 
signals which reduce the 70% noise limitation 
to an overall limitation of 50%. 

The following example explains how the 
tables should be used: 

Consider three co-channel tv stations in the 
low vhf band: Stations A, B and C (see Figure 
1). [Editor's Note: Figure 1 not reproduced in 
this text.] The stations are offset. Station A is 

1 See "Present Knowledge of Propagation in the 
Vhf and Uhf Tv Bands", W. C. Boese and H. 
Fine TRR 2.4.15., Nov. 15, 1955. 



TABLE I 

Distance to Noise Limited Contour for Locations Indicated 

Low Vhf High Vhf Uhf 

At 50% tocations 78 Miles 70 Miles 49 Miles 

At 70% Locations 71 Miles 66 Miles 45 Miles 



TABLE II 

Minimum Spacing Required So That Grade B Service 
Contour Is Limited by Noise Only 

Low Vhf High Vhf Uhf 

Offset 271 Miles 247 Miles 155 Miles 

Non-Offset 364 Miles 326 Miles 239 Miles 



TABLE III 



Distance (di in Miles) to Grade B Interference Free Serv- 
ice Contour in the Direction of an Interfering Station at 
Spacing Indicated 



cd a riwr 


LOW 


VHF 


HIGH 


VHF 


UHF 






Non- 




Non- 


Ma.. 

won— 


(Miles) 


Offset 


Offset 


Offset 


Offset 


Offset Offset 


100 


26.5 




31.0 




37.0 


110 


30.0 




34.0 




40.5 


120 


32.5 




37.5 




43.0 


130 


35.5 




40.0 




45.0 


140 


38.5 




43.0 




47.0 


150 


41.0 




46.0 




48.0 


155 










49.0 


160 


44.0 




48.5 






170 


47.0 




51.0 






180 


50.0 




53.5 






190 


52.5 




56.5 




41.5 


200 


55.5 


37.5 


58.5 


42.5 


43.0 


210 


58.5 


40.0 


61.0 


45.5 


44.5 


220 


61.5 


42.5 


63.5 


48.0 


46.5 


230 


64.5 


45.0 


66.0 


51.0 


48.0 


240 


67.5 


48.0 


68.5 


53.5 


49.0 


250 


70.5 


50.5 


70.0 


55.0 




260 


74.0 


53.0 




57.0 




270 


77.5 


55.5 




59.0 




280 


78.0 


57.5 




61.0 




290 




60.0 




63.0 




300 




62.0 




65.0 




310 




65.0 




6V.0 




320 




67.0 




69.0 




330 




69.0 




70.0 




340 




72.0 








350 




74.0 








360 




77.0 








370 




78.0 









TABLE IV 

Distance (da) From Undesired Station at Which Interfer- 
ing Signal Will Reduce the 70% Location Noise Limita- 
tion of Desired Station to an Overall Grade B Limitation 

Low Vhf High Vhf Uhf 

Offset 208 Miles 188 Miles 124 Miles 

Non-Offset 307 Miles 274 Miles 210 Miles 



180 miles from Station B and 225 miles from 
Station C. Station B is 290 miles from Station C. 
The problem is to determine the limitations of 
the Grade B contour of Station A in the pres- 
ence of noise and the interfering signals from 
Stations B and C. 

From Table I draw the 50% and 70% loca- 
tion contours as limited by noise. These are 
found to be circles of 78 and 71 mile radii, 
respectively. The contour limitation of Station 
A in the direction of Station B can be obtained 
by finding from Table III the distance to the 
interference free Grade B contour d t for a 
spacing of 180 miles for low vhf stations oper- 
ating on an offset basis. This contour is found 
to fall 50 miles from Station A, and this point 
should be plotted on a line between Stations 
A and B. 

Two additional points should now be located 
to determine the limitation of the Grade B 
contour of Station A in the presence of noise 
and interference from Station B. These addi- 
tional two points may be located from Table 



- The figures in the table were computed by 
obtaining the point on a line between stations 
at which the desired field exceeds the undesired 
by the required ratio. This does not give the 
precise point at which Grade B service is limited 
since receiver noise factor is not considered. 
In dealing with stations in the low vhf band, 
it would be necessary to consider non-offset sta- 
tions as far removed as 650 miles in order to 
take noise also into account. When using the 
simple method employed here for the spacings 
usually encountered the results may place the 
service contours from 1 to 4 miles beyond the 
actual figure that will be obtained if noise were 
also taken into account. Nevertheless, we believe 
the suggested method affords results of sufficient 
accuracy for present purposes. 



Page 96 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



IV. From this table find the pertinent distance 
d 2 . The required points will be this distance 
from Station B — the undesired station — and 
will lie on the 70% location noise-limited con- 
tour of Station A, i.e., at points x and y in the 
diagram. In the example d 2 is 208 miles. 
These points will be positioned symmetrically 
with relation to the point already determined 
above and will indicate where noise will limit 
service to 70% of the locations and the inter- 
fering signal will limit service to 70% of the 
locations. The cumulative effect would thus 
be a limitation of service to 50% of the loca- 
tions. 

The Grade B contour of Station A as limited 
by noise, and interference from Station B will 
be determined by an arc of a circle drawn 
through the three points which have been 
located. The above procedure should be re- 
peated for Station C. 

The Grade B contour limitations for Station 
A are shown in the figure as indicated by the 
arrows. 

CONCURRING STATEMENT OF 
COMMISSIONER E. M. WEBSTER 

I concur in the thinking of a majority of the 
Commission that ultimately commercial televi- 
sion broadcasting may have to be moved to 
the uhf band. But, like my colleagues, I am of 
the opinion that a decision to make such a shift 
at this time would be premature in view of the 
present status of this phase of the radio art. 
Therefore, I am in accord with the Commis- 
sion's desire and suggestion that the industry 
immediately launch an expedited research and 
development program designed to hasten the 
day when uhf will be able to assume its proper 
role in the nationwide television system. 

The Commission, by this Report and Order, 
expresses its growing concern in regard to the 
rapidly increasing needs of other radio services 
for additional spectrum space and points out 
that the transfer of television broadcasting to 
the uhf band would provide accommodiations 
for the expanding requirements of industry in 
the lower part of the vhf spectrum which is 
well suited to the needs of the land mobile serv- 
ices. However, it does not appear that there 
is any inclination on the part of the Commis- 
sion to re-examine the spectrum for this pur- 
pose at any time in the near future. While it 
is true that the conclusions to be reached as a 
result of such an examination would be tem- 
pered by the accomplishments of the expedited 
research program; nevertheless, it is my opinion 
that an examination of the lower vhf band 
should be conducted simultaneously therewith 
so that findings in each case could conceivably 
be reached at approximately the same time. 
Accordingly, I believe the Commission should 
immediately issue a notice of proposed rule 
making for the purpose of developing such data 
as it may need in determining the best use to 
be made of the lower vhf spectrum. 

CONCURRING STATEMENT OF 
COMMISSIONERS HYDE AND 
BARTLEY 

We concur in the adoption of the order, al- 
though we do not agree with discussion in the 
report regarding the disposition of certain prior 
tv allocation proceedings on which we have 
previously stated our views. 

STATEMENT OF COMMISSIONER 
MACK 

The Commission's Sixth Report and Order 
(FCC 52-294; April 14, 1952) adopted channel 
assignment principles and standards for televi- 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



sion broadcasting which have afforded a sound 
legal guide for the public and industry and 
which have promoted the rapid development of 
television in the United States. Today more 
than 90% of the homes in the United States 
are within range of at least one station and the 
great majority can receive two or more sta- 
tions. The construction of additional stations 
already approved by this Commission will 
bring still more service. 

Consequently, it appears highly speculative, 
on the record in this proceeding, that any 
changes should be undertaken at this time to 
alter the principles set forth in the Sixth Report 
and Order prior to the adoption of a long-range 
program. To the contrary, the growth of the 
television industry is real evidence of the value 
of the Sixth Report in bringing television 
service to the greatest number of people. We 
may well recognize the industry's problems, 
but we cannot overlook the fact that in the 
present channel assignments the public is well 
served. 

I do believe that the long-range program 
undertaken in conjunction with all segments of 
the broadcasting industry may well answer 
many problems which presently face the Com- 
mission. 

DISSENTING STATEMENT OF 
COMMISSIONER DOERFER 

Although I concur in that part of today's 
action soliciting comments as to the feasibility 
of moving all television broadcasting to the 
uhf portion of the spectrum. I cannot concur 
with that part of the proposed interim action 
which would deintcrmix a mere handful of so- 
called uhf markets. The proposed action would 
not make a significant or a substantial contribu- 
tion toward the full utilization of the seventy 
uhf channels. 

Although the avowed purpose of deinter- 
mixing is to provide a better competitive situa- 
tion in these markets in the interim, actually 
this action is confined merely to those pending 
vhf applications which incurred delays in proc- 
essing. This is a fortuitous circumstance and 
not a substantive solution to the problem. 

The Federal Communications Act provides 
that the distribution of frequencies among the 
several states and communiti.-s shall be upon a 
fair, efficient and equitable basis. It makes no 
provision for a "nation-wide competitive sys- 
tem." Admittedly ample competition, if attain- 
able without doing violence to the equitable 
and efficient provisions of the Act, would be in 
the public interest. But when this is to be ac- 
complished at the expense of denying a first 
television service to substantial numbers of 
people, it is tantamount to displacing the Con- 
gressional mandate of an efficient and equitable 
distribution and substituting therefor equal 
competitive facilities for a few applicants. 

To assign only uhf frequencies to some com- 
munities when a vhf service is available is, in 
my opinion, inequitable. A vhf service pres- 
ently is superior to a uhf. In comparison with 
uhf, a vhf signal has a wider coverage and less 
shadow area. Both in operation and in recep- 
tion, vhf is less costly. To ignore these dif- 
ferences in the present stage of the develop- 
ment of broadcasting is to disregard the special- 
ized knowledge of this Commission and the 
experience of the industry and the public. 

It cannot be denied that the reception of uhf 
is more costly. It requires special antennas, 
more sensitive receiving sets and more frequent 
and more costly maintenance. 

Nor does the proposed rule making suggest 
efficient use of the spectrum. This Commission 
has allocated over 85% of the television spec- 



trum space for uhf television broadcasting. 
The proposal today gives promise of using that 
portion to serve less than 10% of the present 
or the foreseeable demand. • The deintermixture 
proposed will not create any more markets for 
uhf transmitting equipment or receiver sets. 
All markets proposed to be deintermixed have 
already substantially converted to uhf sets. At 
best, such action provides only a replacement 
market for less than 4 million sets and main- 
tains the status quo — with no reasonable pros- 
pect for improvement. 

The proposed action will also deny to the 
Commission the opportunity to gain reliable 
experience upon which to base future action. 
By creating uhf islands, the Commission also, 
as a corollary, creates vhf islands. Hence, 
there will be little opportunity to observe how 
successfully a uhf service can compete with a 
vhf service in the same market with a slight 
change in the network rules. 

The willingness to study the feasibility of 
moving all television broadcasting to the uhf 
band is conditioned upon a big "IF." Neither 
this nor future Commissions will order this 
move unless there is practical assurance that 
uhf receiving and transmitting equipment de- 
velops a quality of performance equal to that 
of vhf. It is inconceivable that the present or 
future Commission will take any action which 
would disenfranchise thousands of people now 
receiving service in the fringe area of a present 
vhf operation without such assurance. 

Because I have grave doubts as to the even- 
tual feasibility of an all-uhf system, I consider 
it to be the sheerest speculation to take steps 
now which would, for a long time, consign uhf 
to small and insignificant islands of competi- 
tion. Even with possible improvement of equip- 
ment, the best that a uhf operator could show 
a national or regional advertiser in the future 
is success in a sheltered harbor. I can see no 
substantial support forthcoming from the ad- 
vertisers — the backbone of broadcasting in this 
country — to a uhf service without proof of 
competitive ability in a mixed market. 

No petitioner or Commissioner has indicated 
how this transition from an all-uhf market to a 
mixed market of vhf s and uhf s in the future 
will be accomplished. At best, nothing more is 
expressed than a hope. Indeed, the interim 
action of today is in the opposite direction from 
realizing the full utilization of the vhf and uhf 
portion of the spectrum to effect a truly nation- 
wide competitive system. 

If anything useful can be done to afford uhf 
an opportunity to compete successfully in a 
mixed market in the interim, it should be in 
the field of programming. To this extent, some 
help may be ventured by the adoption of a 
network rule designed to prevent a single vhf 
from skimming all the best network programs 
within a given market. Such rule may even 
prove helpful in a 2-only uhf market for a 
seedling uhf to grow. In any event, such a 
rule would give a more realistic promise, short 
of the full realization of an all-uhf system, of 
a truly nation-wide competitive system using 
both types of frequencies than a proposal to 
solidify a large number of vhf islands unassail- 
able now and in the future from uhf compe- 
tition. 

As an interim measure, some readjustment 
of competitive facilities in predominantly vhf 
markets today may be worked out. But I can- 
not concur that it should be done by an utter 
disregard of the equitable provisions of the 
Communications Act or the possibility of un- 
dermining the only available foundation for 
the growth of uhf in intermixed markets. 

July 2, 1956 • Page 97 



PROGRAMS & PROMOTIONS 



RECORD PULL IN WOR-TV CONTEST 

THE HEAVY audience pull of WOR-TV New 
York's Million Dollar Movie Album Week 
Contest was underlined in an observation of the 
Reuben H. Donnelly Corp., New York, that 
going back to 1939 that company's records 
show that "no sponsor has produced in a local 
New York contest as many entries as received 
in this contest." A total of 97,347 entries were 
received, according to the Donnelly Corp., the 
contest's judges, which noted that the figure 
represented "approximately double that of other 
successful New York contests." 

The contest, which ran from May 28-June 10, 
required viewers to select the motion pictures 
that WOR-TV plans to run during Album Week 
(July 9-15) and their playing dates. Names of 
the contest winners — those who come closest to 
selecting the seven films and their playing dates 
— will be announced shortly. Among the 100 
prizes are a Ford Thunderbird and $1,000 cash, 
and round trips to Paris for two. 

WBC NATIONAL EAR ON NEA 

THE 94th annual meeting of the National Edu- 
cation Assn., starting in Portland, Ore., today 
(Monday) will be covered in part by all five 
of Westinghouse Broadcasting Co.'s radio sta- 
tions, KEX Portland, KYW Cleveland, WOWO 
Fort Wayne, KDKA Pittsburgh and WBZ- 
WBZA Boston-Springfield, Mass. The news and 
special events staff of KEX will cover the entire 
meeting, recording the two principal keynote 
speeches of special U. S. Ambassador to the 
Middle East Eric Johnston and NEA President 
John Lester Buford, feeding reports to the other 
four WBC stations. 

SALLY SET FOR LIFE ON WJMJ 

SALLY STARR, conductor of the twice-daily 
Jamboree show on WJMJ Philadelphia, has just 
signed what the station calls an "unprece- 



'BIG 9' 

"BIG 9," a fully animated cartoon char- 
acter complete with 10-gallon hat, is now 
giving the station breaks for KWTV 
(TV) Oklahoma City. The "big" signi- 
fies the station's 1,572 ft. transmitter 
tower while "9" designates the CBS af- 
filiate's channel number. 

The idea for "Big 9" was conceived 




by Montez Tjaden, promotion manager, 
and Perry Dickey, program director, and 
was turned over to Erwin, Wasey & Co., 
KWTV's agency, for development. Offi- 
cially adopted as the station's trademark, 
"Big 9" now appears on all the station's 
advertising, promotion and printed ma- 
terial. 



dented" contract with West Side Lincoln-Mer- 
cury, Jamboree sponsor. West Side contracted 
for lifetime options on Miss Starr as talent for 
the WJMJ show, marking what the station 
claims is a "first" for an auto dealer. The life- 
time agreement was made through Benjamin 
Katz Agency, Philadelphia. 

GLAMOUR TEAM FOR NBC SPOT 

NBC SPOT SALES sent a quartet of glamorous 
quarterbacks into the field to promote its sta- 
tions' fall football lineups. The team of New 
York models, dressed in abbreviated football 
costume, carried megaphones with promotion 
brochures attached which they left with clients. 
Prospects were advised of the visit by a telegram 
reading: "Be on the lookout for All-American 
girl between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., June 20th. She 
will get in a huddle with you for the latest on 
top lineups (penalties for holding)." 

NO REST FOR KFAB STAFF 

KFAB Omaha newsmen may vacate station 
premises sometimes in the summer, but for 
them there's no vacation in the usual sense of 
the word. Ken Headrick, vacationing in Fre- 
mont, Neb., June 1 1 turned in what KFAB says 
was the first report on a robbery-murder oc- 
curring on the outskirts of that town. Another 
staffer, Don Norman, vacationing in Seattle 
June 21, got his report of an airplane collision 
he witnessed into the station newsroom before 
wire services. 

LIVELIER NETWORK AFTERNOON 

STARTING today (Monday), NBC-TV's week- 
day afternoon schedule goes into high gear 
with a total of two and a half hours of live 
telecasting. The major change, announced last 
week, was made in Queen for a Day, formerly 
a 30-minute show, now expanded to 45 min- 
utes. Queen, previously scheduled at 4:30-5 
p.m., moves back to 4-4:45 p.m., replacing 
Date With Life (off the air), while Modern 
Romances shifted from 4:15-4:30 p.m. to the 
15 minutes immediately following Queen. As 
NBC-TV's schedule reads now, the network 
goes live at 2:30 p.m. starting with the Ten- 
nessee Ernie Ford Show, followed by the semi- 
color Matinee Theatre which in turn precedes 
Queen. 

WFAI, CBS HIT SILK 

WFAI Fayetteville, N. C, and the CBS Radio 
Network, anxious to leave no corner of radio 
reporting unexplored, went into the air with the 
18th Airborne Corps, of the U. S. A., Fort 
Bragg, N. C, via facilities of the Air Force's 
464th Troop Carrier Wing, and came down 
with two parachutists. The chutists carried 
handie-talkie radios and reported thoughts and 
sensations during the 50 seconds it took to fall 
1,200 feet to earth. WFAI recorded the report 
for broadcast on the network. 

WDRC SALUTES CIVIC OFFICERS 

WDRC Hartford, Conn., isn't waiting for 
local civic organizations to knock on its door. 
The station has inaugurated a series of air sa- 
lutes honoring new officers as they are elected 
by each group. On election, each officer comes 
in for at least three 15-second congratulatory 
messages during the broadcast day. 

ABC GETS LISTENER PROFILE 

UNION sponsors and ABC Radio, as a result 
of a 19-market survey by Pulse Inc., now know 
the age, sex, socio-economic level, occupation 
and union membership status of listeners to 
Edward P. Morgan's AFL sponsored news pro- 
gram and John W. Vandercook's CIO newscast, 



both on the network daily in the evening. The 
nationwide survey is said to be the first of its 
kind. 

In addition to composite ratings, total homes 
and listeners per home, Pulse learned that 
approximately 65% of both audiences are over 
35 years old, 5% are teenagers and 30% be- 
tween 18 and 35. Men predominate in the 
audiences to the extent of 55-60% of the total. 
Income, determined by house rent, and divided 
into "upper, upper middle, lower middle and 
lower" quartiles, was fairly evenly distributed 
for each program, with slightly more listeners 
falling into "lower middle." Union-member 
listeners to Mr. Morgan were 51.9% of his 
total listenership and 45.5% for Mr. Vander- 
cook. Occupationally, craftsmen and operatives 
accounted for nearly half of listeners to both 
shows, with remaining listenership scattered 
among all other work classifications. 

PILOTS GET CHANCE ON NBC-TV 

A NEW summer series to be sponsored by 
Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, will consist 
of "pilot" reels of tv film series which have 
never been shown to the public and many of 
which probably will be shown on tv in the fall 
or at some other time in the future, according 
to NBC-TV. The network announced last week 
that the series, Sneak Preview, will occupy the 
time slot in which Jane Wyman's Fireside Thea- 
ter (Tues. 9-9:30 p.m. EDT) regularly ap- 
pears. John Egan of Compton Adv., New York, 
is in charge of production for the summer 
series. 

MORE MUSIC ON ABC 

ABC RADIO adds nearly two hours of mood 
music to its weeknight schedule, beginning 
today (Monday). The Mon.-Fri. series, entitled 
Imagination-Milton Cross, will be broadcast 
10:05-11:55 p.m. EDT, with five minute news 
summaries interspersed at 10, 10:25, 10:55, 
11:25 and 11:55. The starting date is one day 
after the network began airing its new Sunday 
night 2V2 hour country music show [B*T, June 
25]. 

'PANTOMIME' SUBS FOR 'PERSON' 

AMERICAN OIL CO., through Joseph Katz 
Co., both Baltimore, and Time Inc., through 
Young & Rubicam, New York, will continue 
to hold the Friday, 10:30-11 p.m. time slot on 
CBS-TV through the summer while Edward R. 
Murrow's Person To Person takes its summer 
hiatus. Replacement show is Mike Stokey's 
Pantomime Quiz, starring Rocky Graziano, 
Carol Haney, Robert Strauss, Dorothy Hart 
and Hans Conreid. 



BREAKS WITH TRADITION 

WMCT (TV) Memphis, Tenn., has broken 
with tradition and is now telecasting live, 
remote station breaks. The station sets 
aside one day each week and sends its mo- 
bile equipment, crew and talent to a spot 
overlooking the Mississippi River where 
water, rail and bridges converge, or to 
the airport for station breaks from the 
aircraft themselves and from the weather 
bureau located there. Another week 
finds the team stationed at a point over- 
looking a busy downtown Memphis 
street, where the cameras catch glimpses 
of traffic from 11 a.m. until 7 p.m. The 
WMCT program department is currently 
busy planning an itinerary for its remote 
station breaks which have become a 
regular weekly feature on the WMCT 
schedule. 



Page 98 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



FOR THE RECORD 




AN HOUR-LONG tape, compiled by Ray 
Starr, manager of WJAN Spartanburg, 
S. C, telling the story of Glenn Miller 
from 1929 until he entered the Air Force, 
has been presented to the Library of 
Congress by WJAN. Dr. Harold Spivacke 
(I), head of the library's music depart- 
ment, accepts the tape from Mr. Starr (r) 
as WJAN President W. Ennis Bray looks 
on. With the presentation, WJAN claims 
to be the only South Carolina radio sta- 
tion having a program in the Library of 
Congress. 

KXYZ TAKES LOSS ON CASH 

TO prove it really does want to give away 
money on the Kasli Box show, KXYZ Houston, 
Tex., sent Johnny Edwards into the streets dur- 
ing one broadcast to sell $5 bills for a bargain 
$4. Stationed on a busy street corner during 
the last half-hour of the 1-3 p.m. program, 
Mr. Edwards and aides were virtually mobbed' 
as a dollar-happy crowd surged around them. 
The stunt attracted attention of the Houston 
Press which sent a reporter and photographer 
for front page coverage. , 

'BAXTER TAKES FIVE' ON CBS 

Dr. Frank Baxter, professor of English at the 
U. of Southern California and known for his 
various series of tv programs on Shakespeare 
on CBS-owned KNXT (TV) Los Angeles, is 
doing a nightly capsule commentary series on 
CBS Radio titled Dr. Baxter Takes Five. The 
sustaining program is now scheduled 7:25-7:30 
p.m. EDT and will be rescheduled later this 
month. 

BIG RESPONSE FOR RALSTON 

RALSTON-PURINA Co., St. Louis, need look 
no further for the rating of Grand Ole Opry 
on ABC-TV since they'll find the magic number 
in an avalanche of mail pouring into the prem- 
ises of WSM-TV Nashville, which originates 
the show. 

Several weeks ago, viewers were invited to 
write in — for 10 top prizes of a round-trip 
ticket to Nashville — stating what they thought 
of the show. Two days later the WSM-TV 
mailroom reported a count of 25,000 letters, 
by the end of the week had upped the number 
to 250,000. Since the program is carried live 
on 40 ABC-TV affiliates with 110 others carry- 
ing it on a delayed basis, WSM-TV estimated 
influx of 6,000 letters from each station. By 
the time the names of the winners were sched- 
uled to be read June 23, the number was about 
to reach the 600,000 mark. Ralston's agency 
is Gardner Adv., St. Louis. 



Station Authorizations, Applications 

(As Compiled by B»T) 

June 21 through June 27 

Includes data on new stations, changes in existing stations, ownership changes, hearing 
cases, rules & standards changes and routine roundup. 

Abbreviations: 



Cp — construction permit. DA — directional an- 
tenna. ERP — effective radiated power, vhf — 
very high frequency, uhf — ultra high frequency, 
ant. — antenna, aur. — aural, vis. — visual, kw kilo- 
watts, w — watts, mc — megacycles. D — day. N — 



night. LS — local sunset, mod. — modification, 
trans. — transmitter, unl. — unlimited hours, kc— 
kilocycles. SCA — subsidiary communications au- 
thorizations. SSA — special service authorization. 
STA — special temporary authorization. 



Am-Fm Summary Through June 27 Tv Summary Through June 27 

Total Operating Stations in U. S.: 

Vhf Uhf Total 
Commercial 360 94 454 1 











Appls. 


In 




On 






Pend- 


Hear- 




Air 


Licensed 


Cps 


ing 


ing 


Am 


2,865 


3,023 


235 


285 


123 


Fm 


517 


548 


46 


12 






Noncom. Educational 



15 



20 2 



Am 


Fm 


Tv 


2.C58 


519 


180 


32 


13 


315 


118 


15 


112 


3,008 


547 


607 


168 


2 


125 


273 


6 


41 


110 





92 


144 


7 


25 


897 


59 


298 





2 








1 


1 



FCC Commercial Station Authorizations 
As of May 31, 1956* 



Licensed (all on air) 
Cps on air 
Cps not on air 
Total authorized 
Applications in hearing 
New station requests 
New station bids in hearing 
Facilities change requests 
Total applicants pending 
Licenses deleted in May 
Cps deleted in May 

* Based on official FCC monthly reports. These 
are not always exactly current since the FCC 
must await formal notifications of stations going 
on the air, ceasing operations, surrendering li- 
censes or grants, etc. These figures do not include 
noncommercial, educational fm and tv stations. 
For current status of am and fm stations see 
"Am-Fm Summary," above, and for tv stations 
see "Tv Summary," next column. 



FCC ANNOUNCEMENTS 
New Tv Stations . . . 

ACTION BY FCC 

St. Paul, Minn.— Twin City Area Educational 
Television Corp. granted vhf ch. 2 (54-60 mc): 
ERP 52.2 kw vis., 31.6 kw aur.: ant. height above 
average terrain 615.75 ft., above ground 562 ft. 
Estimated construction cost $394,049. first year 
operating cost $175,000. Post office address 2070 W 
Roselawn Ave., St. Paul. Studio location, St. Paul. 
Trans, location Falcon Heights. Geographic co- 
ordinates 44° 59' 54" N. Lat., 93° 11' 17" W. Long. 
Trans, and ant. RCA. Legal counsel Faegre & 
Benson, Minneapolis. Consulting engineer Berten 
A. Holmbere, chief engineer. Applicant is com- 
posed of non-stockholding principals who intend 
to use station for non-commercial educational 
purposes. Granted June 20. 

APPLICATIONS 

Salem, Ore— Salem Television Co., vhf ch. 3 
(60-66 mc); ERP 1.4 kw vis., .841 kw aur.; ant. 
height above average terrain 926.75 ft., above 
ground 224 ft. Estimated construction cost $63,300, 
first year operating cost $144,000, revenue $130,000. 
Post office address % C. H. Fisher, 3540 N. E. 
Klickitat, Portland, Ore. Studio location Salem. 
Trans, location Salem. Geographic coordinates 
44° 59' 15" N. Lat., 123° 08' 15" W. Long. Trans, 
and ant. RCA. Legal counsel Harvey S. Benson, 
Portland. Consulting engineer Alvin H. Barnard, 
Eugene, Ore. Principals are C. H. Fisher and his 
wife Edna E. Fisher, who own KAGT Anacortes, 
Wash., KDLS The Dalles, Ore., KUMA Pendleton, 
Ore. Mr. Fisher owns KIHR Hood River, Ore., 
and 23.66% of KVAL-TV Eugene, Ore. Filed 
June 26. 

Aberdeen, S. D. — Aberdeen Television Co., vhf 
ch. 9 (186-192 mc); ERP 1.68 kw vis., .785 kw aur..; 
ant. height above average terrain 204 ft., above 
ground 220 ft. Estimated construction cost $83,- 
432.82, first year operating cost $64,250, revenue 
$87,500. Post office address Aberdeen. Studio 
location one mile west of Aberdeen on 8th Ave. 
Trans, location one mile west of Aberdeen on 8th 
Ave. Geographic coordinates 45° 28' 30" N. Lat., 
98° 30' 41" W. Long. Trans. Gates, ant. Prodelin. 
Legal counsel Harry J. Daly. Washington. Con- 
sulting engineer Ralph J. Bitzer, St. Louis, Mo. 
Principals include partners Joseph E. McNaugh- 
ton (64%), 31% owner of WRMN Elgin, 111., 60% 
owner of WCRA Effingham, 111., 49% owner of 



Grants since July II, 7952: 



(When FCC began processing applications 
after tv freeze) 



Commercial 
Noncom. Educational 



Vhf 

320 

22 



Uhf Total 

312 632i 
20 42= 



Applications filed since April 14, 7952: 

(When FCC ended Sept. 28, 1948-April 14, 1952 
freeze on tv processing) 





New 


Amend. Vhf 


Uhf 


Total 


Commercial 


1,001 


337 


784 


554 


1,3393 


Noncom. Educ. 


61 




34 


27 


61* 


Total 


1,062 


337 


818 


581 


1,400 s 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



1 168 cps (32 vhf, 136 uhf) have been deleted. 

2 One educational uhf has been deleted. 

3 One applicant did not specify channel. 
1 Includes 42 already granted. 

6 Includes 674 already granted. 



KXGI Fort Madison. Iowa; William D. McNaugh- 

ton (23%), 19% owner of WRMN and 28% owner 
of KXGI, and F. F. McNaughton (13%), 19% 
owner of WCRA. Filed June 26. 

PETITION 

Mount Airy, N. C. — Paul E. Johnson petitions 
FCC to amend Sec. 3.606 (b) of Commission's 
Rules by issuance of rule-making for allocation 
of ch. 8 to Mount Airy and deletion of ch. 55 
from Mount Airv. Petitioner also requests amend- 
ment of Sees. 3.610 and 3.614 of Rules so as to 
permit operation of station on ch. 8 at Mount 
Airy. Filed June 22. 

PETITIONS DISMISSED 

WANE-TV Fort Wayne, Ind. — Petition seeking 
amendment of Sec. 3.606 of Rules by changing 
educational reservation in Fort Wayne from ch. 
27 to 69 and also requesting that order to show 
cause be issued against Radio Fort Wayne Inc., 
requiring change in operating assignment of 
WANE-TV from ch. 69 to 27, dismissed at re- 
quest of petitioner. Action June 22. 

KOTA-TV Rapid City, S. D.— Petition seeking 
amendment of Sec. 3.606(b) of Rules to provide 
for reallocation of ch. 3 from Miles City, Mont., 
to Glendive, Mont., or, in alternative, to delete 
ch. 3 from Miles City, dismissed at request of 
petitioner. 

Existing Tv Stations . . . 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

KKTV (TV) Colorado Springs, Colo.— Granted 
mod. of cp to increase ERP to 115 kw vis., 58.9 
kw aur., change studio location, and waived rule 
to permit installation of DA. Granted June 20. 

WESH-TV Daytona Beach, Fla.— FCC desig- 
nated for hearing to consist of oral argument ap- 
plication to transfer control of WESH-TV from 
W. Wright Esch, Adelaide B. Esch and Louis Os- 
sinsky to WCOA Inc. (WCOA Pensacola); made 
Theodore Granik and William H. Cook, who pro- 
tested April 25 grant of application without hear- 
ing, parties to proceeding bearing burden of pro- 
ceeding with introduction of evidence and burden 
of proof; denied protestants' request for with- 
drawal of May 29 STA issued WESH-TV. Action 
June 20. 

KLSE (TV) Monroe, La.— Granted STA to 
operate on ch. 13 for period ending June 27. 
Granted June 20. 

. WCDA (TV) Albany, N. Y. — Application seek- 
ing mod. of cp to change ERP cancelled at re- 
quest of attorney. Action June 25. 
WKNO-TV Memphis, Tenn. — Granted STA to 

July 2, 1956 • Page 99 



FOR THE RECORD 



operate on ch. 10 for period ending July 23. 
Granted June 18. 

WFRV-TV Green Bay, Wis.— Granted mod. of 
cp to change studio location to northwest corner 
of Roosevelt and Mason Sts., Green Bay. Granted 
June 18. 

WISC-TV Madison, Wis.— Granted STA to op- 
erate commercially on ch. 3 for period ending 
Aug. 7. Granted June 20. 

CALL LETTERS ASSIGNED 

KOXI (TV) Klamath Falls, Ore.— California- 
Oregon Television Inc., ch. 2. Changed from 
KFJI-TV. 



KHTV (TV) Twin Falls, Idaho— Seeks mod. of 
cp (which authorized new tv) to change studio 
location to 241 Main Ave., West Twin Falls, and 
change ERP to 50 kw vis., 25 kw aur. Filed 
June 21. 

WTVW (TV) Evansville, Ind.— Seeks mod. of 
cp (which authorized new tv) to change studio 
location to 405 Carpenter St., Evansville, and 
make other equipment changes. Filed June 25. 

WHUM-TV Reading, Pa.— Seeks mod. of cp 
(which authorized new tv) to maintain main 
studios at trans, location; change ERP to 214 
kw vis., 107 kw aur.; maintain DA system author- 
ized in current STA, and make other equipment 
changes. Filed June 21. 

KTBC-TV Austin, Tex.— Seeks mod. of cp to 
change trans, location to 4 miles northwest of 
Texas State Capitol near Austin; change ERP 
to 316 kw vis., 158 kw aur.; change to non-DA, 
and make other equipment changes. Filed 
June 25. 

KVOS-TV Bellingham, Wash.— Seeks mod. of 
cp (which authorized new tv) to change ERP to 
224 kw vis., 112 kw aur., and make other equip- 
ment changes. Filed June 21. 



New Am Stations . . . 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

Eureka, Calif. — W. A. Hansen granted 790 kc, 
5 kw D. Post office address P. O. Box 1109, Med- 
ford, Ore. Estimated construction cost $28,588.17, 
first year operating cost $48,000, revenue $60,000. 
Mr. Hansen owns 33.3% of KBOY Medford, Ore., 
and 33.3% of KLAD Klamath Falls, Ore. Granted 
June 20. 

Palm Springs, Calif. — George E. Cameron Jr. 

granted 930 kc, 500 w D. Post office address 1432 
Beverly Estates Dr., Beverly Hills, Calif. Esti- 
mated construction cost $20,343, first year oper- 
ating cost $60,000, revenue $50,000. Mr. Cameron is 
40% owner of Palm Springs, Calif., newspaper, 
former 70% owner of KOTV (TV) Tulsa Okla., 
and is director of Hartford Telecasting Co., ap- 
plicant for ch. 3, Hartford, Conn. Granted June 20. 

Jerome, Idaho — Northside Broadcasters Inc. 
granted 1400 kc, 250 w unl. Post office address 128 
W. Main St.., Jerome. Estimated construction cost 
$11,194, first year operating cost $32,000, revenue 
$38,000. Principals are Pres. Karl Metzcnberg 
(33.3%), continuity director, KUMA Pendleton, 
Ore.; Vice Pres. -Gen. Manager-Chmn. of Board 
Herbert Everitt (33.3%), KUMA sales manager; 
Secy. Tom Prescott (16.6%), real estate; and 
Treas. Charles L'Herrison (16.6%), furniture and 
real estate interests. Granted June 20. 

Milford, Mass. — James W. Miller granted 1490 
kc, 100 w unl. Post office address Blanchard Bldg., 
Southbridge, Mass. Estimated construction cost 
$13,000, first year operating cost $40,000, revenue 
$50,000, Mr. Miller is pres.-50% owner WESO 
Southbridge Mass., and pres. -treas. of The Tele- 
Pool Corp., radio-tv advertising agency. Granted 
June 20. 

Austin, Minn. — George A. Hormel Ill's applica- 
tion seeking cp for new am to be operated on 
1220 kc, 500 w D, returned. (Dated wrong.) Ac- 
tion June 25. 



Columbia, Tenn. — Columbia-Mt. Pleasant & 
Spring Hill Radio Corp. granted 1280 kc, 1 kw D. 
Post office address % Salisbury & Wall, 1624 Eye 
St. N. W., Washington. Estimated construction 
cost $20,831, first year operating cost $30,000, reve- 
nue $36,000. Principals include Pres. Claude H. 
Turner (33 1 / 3 %), manufacturer of church furni- 
ture; Vice Pres. H. F. McKee (33y 3 %), retail 
merchant; and Sec. -Treas. Jack G. Dunn (33 1 / 3 %), 
minister. Granted June 20. 

Grafton, W. Va.— WWW Inc.'s application 
seeking cp for new am to be operated on 1260 kc, 
500 w D, returned. (Dated wrong.) Action 
June 21. 



Bay Minette, Ala. — Southwest Alabama Bcstg. 
Co., 1150 kc, 1 kw D. Post office address % Howard 
E. Pill, P. O. Box 447, Montgomery, Ala. Estimated 
construction cost $18,950, first year operating cost 
$36,000, revenue $48,000. Principals include James 
H. Faulkner (25%), 50% owner of Southwest 
Alabama Pub. Co. (Monroe Journal, Monroeville, 
and Baldwin Times, Bay Minette), and 50% owner 
WMFC Monroeville; William M. Stewart (25%), 
50% owner of Southwest Alabama Pub. Co. and 
WMFC; and Howard E. Pill (42.5%), 35% owner 
of WDAK Columbus, Ga., 25% owner of WDAK- 
TV, and 60 % owner of WHEP Foley, Ala. Filed 
June 21. 

Miami, Fla. — Frieda Bcstg. Corp., 1260 kc, 5 kw 
D. Post office address % Keith Moyer, 1025 W. 
Market St., Taylorville, 111. Estimated construc- 
tion cost §31,000, first year operating cost $48,000, 
revenue $b6,000. Principals include Keith Moyer 
(70%), 55% owner of WTIM Taylorville, 111., 55% 
of WBBA Pittsfield, 111., and 51% of WTAY Robin- 
son, ill.; Frieda Moyer (5%), and Roger L. Moyer 
(25%), 39.3% owner of WTAY. Filed June 21. 

Tampa, Fla. — Robert W. Rounsaville, 1010 kc, 
10 kw D. Post office address 3165 Mathieson Dr., 
N. E., Atlanta 1 , Ga. Estimated construction cost 
$34,446.65, first year operating cost $60,000, reve- 
nue $85,000. Mr. Rounsaville owns WQXI and 
WATL-TV Atlanta, Ga., WQXL-TV Louisville, 
Ky., WOBS Jacksonville, Fla., WMBM Miami 
Beach, Fla., and WLOU Louisville, Ky. Filed 
June 21. 

Dublin, Ga.— Radio South Inc., 1230 kc, 250 w 
D. Post office address P. O. Box 8145, Tampa 4, 
Fla. Estimated construction cost $10,894, first year 
operating cost $36,000, revenue $48,000. Principals 
include Pres. Emerson W. Browne (25%), owner 
of WSFB Quitman, Ga., and WRMB Kissimmee, 
Fla., 33% owner of WCLB Camilla, Ga.; John 
A. Bolings (50%), former owner of WQIK Jack- 
sonville, Fla., and Sarah A. Browne (25%). Filed 
June 21. 

Claremore, Okla.— Lakes Area Bcstg. Co., 1270 
kc, 500 w D. Post office address 5th and S. Mill 
Sts., Pryor, Okla. Estimated construction cost 
$13,180, first year operating cost $1,800, revenue 
$23,000. L. L. Gaffaney is sole owner. Lakes Area 
operates KOLS Pryor, Okla. Filed June 25. 

Newport News, Va. — Selgam Bcstg. Corp., 1270 
kc, 1 kw D. Post office address 222 Citizens Bank 
Bldg., Norfolk, Va. Estimated construction cost 
$17,905, first year operating cost $75,000, revenue 
$85,000. Principals include Jack Siegel (25%); 
Robert E. Wasdon (25%), and Emil J. Arnold 
(50%). Filed June 21. 

Triangle, Va.— O. K. Bcstg. Corp., 1460 kc, 500 
w D. Post office address P. O. Box 386, Fairfax, 
Va. Estimated construction cost $14,300, first year 
operating cost $32,000, revenue $48,000. O. K. 
operates WFCR Fairfax, Va. Principals are Pres. 
George Oleson and wife (50%), and Vice Pres. 
Arthur Kellar and wife (50%). Filed June 21. 



APPLICATIONS AMENDED 

Pine Bluff, Ark. — Radio Pine Bluff's application 
seeking cp for new am to be operated on 1590 kc, 
1 kw D„ amended to change ant. -trans, location 
to just north of city limits, 250 ft. east of U. S. 



79, Pine Bluff, and specify remote control point 
same as studio location. Amended June 25. 

Redding, Calif. — Independent Broadcasters' ap- 
plication seeking cp for new am to be operated 
on 950 kc, 1 kw D, amended to change name of 
applicant to C. E. Wilson and P. D. Jackson d/b 
as Independent Broadcasters. Amended June 21. 

Bradenton, Fla.— Gulf Isles Bcstg. Co.'s appli- 
cation seeking cp for new am to be operated on 
1420 kc, 500 w D, amended to make changes in 
DA pattern. Amended June 25. 

Gresham, Ore. — John Truhan's application 
seeking cp for new am to be operated on 1380 kc, 
500 w D, amended to change frequency to 860 kc; 
change power to 1 kw; make changes in ant., 
and change ground system. Amended June 21. 

Manchester, Tenn. — Manchester Broadcasters' 
application seeking cp for new am to be operated 
on 1280 kc, 1 kw D, amended to change frequency 
to 1580 kc. Amended June 21. 

Prosser, Wash. — Prosser-Grandview Broadcast- 
ers Inc.'s application seeking cp for new am to 
be operated on 1310 kc, 1 kw D, amended to 
change ant. -trans, and studio location to .5 miles 
northwest of Johnson Rd., on Hwy. #410, 3 miles 
northwest of Prosser. Amended June 21. 

Kenmore, Wash. — Jane A. Roberts' application 
seeking cp for new am to be operated on 1330 
kc, 1 kw D, amended to install DA-D. Amended 
June 2. 



Existing Am Stations . . . 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

WHRT Hartselle, Ala.— Granted mod. of cp to 
specify ant.-trans. and studio location and make 
changes in ant. system. Granted June 22. 

KBTA Batesville, Ark. — Granted permission to 
operate from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m., except when 
broadcasting special events. Granted June 20. 

KDQN DeQueen, Ark. — Granted mod. of cp to 
change studio location and remote control point 
to 1925 S. 4th St. Granted June 19. 

KREX Grand Junction, Colo. — FCC waived Sec. 
3.24(b)(7) of blanketing rules and granted cp to 
increase D power from 1 to 5 kw. Action June 20. 

WPGA West Point, Ga. — Designated for hearing 
on application seeking mod. of cp to change ant.- 
trans. and studio location to .35 miles north of 
city. WRLD Lanett, Ala.-Wcst Point, made party 
to proceeding. Action June 20. 

WCMR Elkhart, Ind. — Granted mod. of cp to 
make change in ant. and ground system. 
Granted June 19. 

KFCQ Boone, Iowa — Granted permission to 
remain silent July 4 and Labor Day. Granted 
June 22. 

KDEC Decorah, Iowa — Granted permission to 
sign off at 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday 
beginning July 1, except for special events. 
Granted June 20. 

KUZN West Monroe, La. — Granted mod. of cp 
to change studio location and operate trans, by 
remote control from 218V2 Trenton St. Granted 
June 22. 

KDEX Dexter, Mo. — Granted permission to 
sign off at 6 p.m. through Sept. Action June 19. 

WENE Endicott, N. Y.— Granted change from 
DA-1 to DA-N. Granted June 20. 

WDOS Oneonta, N. Y.— Granted change of fa- 
cilities from 1400 kc, 250 w unl., to 730 kc, 500 W. 
D. Granted June 20. 

WKBC North Wilkesboro, N. C— Granted cp to 
change ant.-traTis. location and make changes 
in ant. and ground system. Granted June 22. 

WALT Conway, S. C— Granted change of fa- 
cilities from 1490 kc, 250 w unl., to 1330 kc, 1 kw 
D. Granted June 20. 

KHEM Big Spring, Tex. — Granted mod. of cp 
to change studio location to Settles Hotel, 200 E. 
3rd St., and operate trans, by remote control 
from same location. Granted June 19. 

WLIN Merrill, Wis. — Granted mod. of license 
to change studio location to U. S. Hwy #51 and 
Hwy. 317, north of Merrill. Granted June 18. 

CALL LETTERS ASSIGNED 

KVNA Flagstaff, Ariz. — The Frontier Television 
Co., 690 kc, 1 kw. Changed from KGPH. 

WSGA Savannah, Ga. — Coastal Bcstg. Inc., 1400 
kc, 250 w. Changed from WDAR. 

WMPY Salisbury, Md.— Hoyt C. Murphy, 1470 
kc, 5 kw. 

WMAB Munising, Mich. — Munising-Alger Bcstg. 
Co., 1400 kc, 250 w. 

KBMO Benson, Minn. — West Central Minnesota 
Bcstg. Co., 1290 kc, 500 w. 

WFLR Dundee, N. Y.— Finger Lakes Bcstg. Co., 
1570 kc, 1 kw. 

WALY Herkimer, N. Y. — Radio Herkimer. 

KGAY Salem, Ore— KGAE Inc., 1430 kc, 1 kw. 
Changed from KGAE. 

WAGE Leesburg, Va.— Richard Field Lewis Jr., 
1290 kc, 1 kw. 

APPLICATIONS 

WICC Bridgeport, Conn. — Seeks cp to increase 
power from 500 w N, 1 kw D, to 1 kw N, 5 kw 
D, and change from DA-1 to DA-2. Filed June 21. 

WWPF Palatka, Fla. — Seeks cp to increase D 
power from 500 w to 1 kw. Filed June 25. 

WHBO Tampa, Fla. — Seeks cp to increase 
power from 250 w to 1 kw. Filed June 21. 

WPNX Columbus, Ga. — Seeks cp to increase D 
power from 1 kw to 5 kw. Filed June 25. 

WBEE Harvey, 111. — Seeks mod. of cp (which 
authorized increase in power and installation of 




APPLICATIONS APPLICATIONS 



Page 100 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



DA) to make changes in DA pattern. Filed 
June 25. 

WORC Worcester, Mass. — Seeks mod. of cp 
(which authorized increase in D power) to make 
changes in DA-N. Filed June 25. 

KATZ St. Louis, Mo. — Seeks cp to increase 
power from 1 kw to 5 kw and change from DA-N 
to DA-2. Filed June 21. 

KFGT Fremont, Neb. — Seeks mod. of license 
to change hours of operation from unl. to speci- 
fied hours — 6:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Filed June 21. 

Wilmington, N. C— (Call letters unassigned.) 
East Coast Radio Co. seeks mod. of cp (which 
authorized new am) to change frequency from 
790 kc to 980 kc and increase power from 500 w 
to 5 kw. Filed June 21. 

KILO Grand Forks, N. D.— Seeks cp to change 
hours of operation from specified hours to unl. 
Filed June 21. 

WYSR Franklin, Va. — Seeks mod. of cp to 
change frequency from 1570 kc to 1430 kc and 
increase power from 250 w to 1 kw. Filed 
June 25. 

APPLICATIONS AMENDED 

KDAY Santa Monica, Calif. — Application seek- 
ing cp to increase power from 10 kw to 50 kw 
and install DA-D, amended to make changes in 
ant. and ground system. Amended June 21. 

WBHS Fitzgerald, Ga.— Application seeking cp 
to change frequency from 1240 kc to 1380 kc, 
increase power from 250 w to 5 kw, and change 
hours of operation from unl. to D, amended to 
change ant.-trans. location to about 1.1 miles 
south of city limits on U. S. #129, and operate 
trans, by remote control from studio location. 
Amended June 25. 

WISK St. Paul, Minn. — Application seeking cp 
to install DA-D and change station location from 
South St. Paul to St. Paul, amended to change 
frequency from 1590 kc to 630 kc; change power 
from 5 kw to 1 kw; change ant.-trans. location 
to .30 mile south of U. S. Hwy. #12, 3.5 miles 
east of St. Paul; make changes in DA system, 
and change ground system. Amended June 21. 

New Fm Stations . . . 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

Storrs, Conn.— Board of Trustees of U. of Conn, 
granted 90.5 mc, 10 w. Post office address U. of 
Conn., Storrs. Estimated construction cost $1,600. 
first year operating cost $4,000. Station is to be 
non-commercial educational operation. Granted 
June 20. 

Evansville, Ind — School City of Evansville 
granted 91.1 mc, 4.5 kw. Post office address 200 
N. W. Seventh St., Evansville 8. Estimated con- 
struction cost $13,140, first year operating cost 
$1,300. Station is for non-commercial educational 
purposes. Granted June 20. 

Royal Oak, Mich. — The School District of Royal 
Oak granted 89.3 mc. Post office address ' , James 
L. Mead, 709 N. Washington, Royal Oak. Estimated 
construction cost $4,200, first year operating cost 
$800. Station is for non-commercial educational 
purposes. Granted June 20. 

APPLICATIONS 

Williamstown, Mass. — The President and Trus- 
tees of Williams College, 90.1 mc, .01 kw. Post 
office address Williamstown. Estimated construc- 
tion cost $3,302, first year operating cost $2,175. 
Station is for non-commercial educational pur- 
poses. Filed June 25. 

Philadelphia, Pa— The Trustees of the U. of Pa., 
91.3 mc, .014 kw. Post office address % Gene D. 
Gisburne, Philadelphia 4. Estimated construction 
cost $2,095, first year operating cost $2,000. Station 
is for noncommercial educational purposes. Filed 
June 21. 



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Existing FM Stations . . . 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

WBOW-FM Terre Haute, Ind. — Granted request 
to cancel license of fm station and delete call 
letters. Granted June 19. 

KFCQ (FM) Boone, Iowa — Granted permission 
to remain silent July 4 and Labor Day. Granted 
June 22. 

APPLICATIONS 

WBSE-FM Hillsdale, Mich.— Seeks mod. of cp 
(which authorized new fm) to change ERP to 
.74 kw. Filed June 25. 

WMUB (FM) Oxford, Ohio — Seeks cp to replace 
expired cp which authorized changes in licensed 
station. Filed June 25. 

WKNA-FM Charleston, W. Va. — Seeks mod. of 
license to change studio location from 804 Kan- 
awha Blvd., Charleston, to Garfield Ave., Bowne- 
mont, W. Va. Filed June 25. 

Ownership Changes . . . 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

WNHC-AM-FM-TV New Haven, Conn.— Grant- 
ed transfer of control to Triangle Publications 
Inc., Radio & Tv Div., for $5.4 million. Triangle's 
Radio and Tv Division is licensee of WFTL-AM- 
FM-TV Philadelphia, Pa., WNBF-AM-FM-TV 
Binghamton, N. Y., and WFBG-AM-TV Altoona,, 
Pa. Granted June 20. 

KGIL San Fernando, Calif. — Granted transfer 
of control to Pierce Brooks Bcstg. Corp. for $475,- 
000. Principal is sole owner Pierce P. Brooks, 
insurance and real estate interests. Granted June 
20. 

WCMI-AM-FM Ashland, Ky.— Granted transfer 
of control to Edwina Bcstg. Corp. for $165,000. 
Sole owner is Pres. George H. Clinton, stock- 
holder of WPAR-AM-FM Parkersburg, W. Va., 
WBLK Clarksburg, W. Va., and WTMA-AM-FM 
Charleston, S. C. Granted June 20. 

WHLN Harlan, Ky.— Granted assignment of li- 
cense to Radio Harlan Inc. Corporate change. 
•J. Francke Fox Jr. will be sole owner. Granted 
June 20. 

WTCW Whitesburg, Ky.— Granted assignment of 
license to Folkways Bcstg. Inc. for $85,000. Prin- 
cipals are Pres. William R. McDaniel (39.92%), 
Vice Pres. Ernest Tubb (39.92%), and Hank Snow 
(19.96%). all associated with WSM Nashville. 
Granted June 20. 

WAAB Worcester, Mass. — Granted assignment 
of license to Waterman Bcstg. Corp. for $163,000. 
Principals are Pres. Bernard E. Waterman (9u 
sports director at WMAV Springfield, HI.; and 
Edith B. Waterman (10', i. Granted June 20. 

WAMM Flint, Mich. — Granted transfer of con- 
trol to Richard S. Carter for $2,083. Transfer is 
for 25'; from Ernest L. Durham. Mr. Carter will 
hold 50% and other partners Albert Binder and 
Harry J. Binder will continue to hold 25'^ ea'ch. 
Granted June 20. 

WSUH Oxford, Miss. — Granted assignment of 
license to Colonel Rebel Radio for $36,500. Princi- 
pals are C. H. Quick (90%), gen. manager of 
Ole Miss Bcstg. Co.. and A. B. Quick (10%), 
beauty salon owner. Granted June 20. 

WKBS Mineola, N. Y.— Granted assignment of 
license to Keynote Bcstg. System Inc. for $116,- 
500. Sole owner is Seymour Weintraub, film 
distribution and production interests pres. -23.53% 
stockholder of United Television Inc. Granted 
June 20. 

KFGT Fremont, Neb. — Granted assignment of 
license to Snyder Enterprises for $36,000. Princi- 
pals are equal partners H. C. Snyder, radio-tv 
sales and repair interests and Leroy Snyder, 
automobile parts interests. Granted June 20. 

KLYN Amarillo, Tex. — Granted assignment of 
license to Kenyon Brown for $20,000 plus five-year 
lease on land and buildings at $500 a month. 
Mr. Brown is owner of KWFT Wichita Falls, Tex., 
20'; owner of KGLC Miami, Okla., 49% owner of 
KBYE Oklahoma City, Okla., pres. -25% owner of 
KFEQ-AM-TV St. Joseph, Mo., and holds 50% 
partnership interest in KANS Wichita, Kan. 
Granted June 20. 

WNVA Norton, Va.— Granted assignment of li- 
cense to Radio Wise Inc. Principals are Pres. 
R. B. Helms (76.5%), 50% owner of WBLU Salem, 
Va., and 25% owner of WCLE Cleveland, Tenn.; 
Vice Pres. Jack T. Helms (12.5%), 25% owner of 
WBLU. and 25% owner of WCLE; and Secv.- 
Treas. O. R. Galliher Jr. (11%). Granted June 20. 

KITN Olympia, Wash. — Granted assignment of 
cp to KITN Inc. Corporate change. Granted 
June 20. 

WHTN-AM-FM-TV Huntington, W. Va.— Grant- 
ed assignment of license to Cowles Bcstg. Co. for 
$535,000 plus assumption of $100,000 debt. Cowles 
is 60% owner of KRNT-TV Des Moines, Iowa, is 
licensee of WNAX Yankton, S. D., and is per- 
mittee of KRNT Des Moines, and KVTV Sioux 
City, Iowa. Granted June 20. 

APPLICATIONS 

WFHK Pell City, Ala.— Seeks assignment of li- 
cense to St. Clair Bcstg. System for $15,000. Prin- 
cipals are co-owners John H. Haynes (25.33%), 
engineer at WMLS Sylacauga, Ala.; Glinn Pruitt 



the station 
that made 
ROANOKE 

VIRGINIA'S 

NO. 1 

TV MARKET 

73.2% 

station share 
of sets . . . (ARB) 




WSLS-TV 

CHANNEL 10 

ROANOKE, VA. 



Represented Nationally — Avery-Knodel, Inc 



Stories 

from the 

Sports Record 

Continuities for July 

Music and sports team up in 
this series devoted to eye-wit- 
ness accounts of dramatic ac- 
tion on the summer sports 
scene. 

July's continuity package 
contains 12 fifteen-minute pro- 
grams featuring the sports of 
the Summer Season . . . Base- 
ball, The Olympics, Swimming 
meets, along with some of the 
great anecdotes of the world 
of sports. 

Your Station Program Department should 
be receiving this script package regu- 
larly. If not, please write to BMTs Sta- 
tion Service Department for "Stories from 
the Sports Record." 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

589 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 17, N.Y. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD • TORONTO • MONTREAL 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 101 



(15.3%); Fred Lamar Kelley (25.33%); Fate L. 
Gossett (22%), and Fred C. Barber (12%). Filed 
June 21. 

KEAR San Francisco, Calif. — Seeks assignment 
of license to Mid-America Broadcasters Inc. for 
$500,000. Mid-America principal is Pres. David M. 
Segal (90.2%). Mid-America stations are KOSF 
Denver, Colo., and WGVM Greenville, Miss. Filed 
June 26. 

KSFO San Francisco, Calif. — Seeks assignment 
of license to KMPC, The Station of the Stars, for 
$951,333 in cash and assumption of liabilities. 
Principals are Gene Autry and Robert O. Reyn- 
olds, owners of KMPC Los Angeles. Mr. Autry 
is also majority stockholder in KOOL-AM-TV 
Phoenix, Ariz., and is part owner of KOPO-AM- 
TV Tucson. Filed June 21. 

KVVG-TV Tulare, Calif.— Seeks acquisition 
of positive control of permittee corporation by 
James Stacy through purchase of 100% of stock 
from M. B. Scott Inc. and Joseph J. Justman for 
$5,000. Mr. Stacy is motion picture producer. Filed 
June 26. 

KLOV Loveland, Colo. — Seeks assignment of li- 
cense to Vogel and Smock for $10,000. Principals 
are partners William R. Vogel (60%), salesman at 
WTAD Quincy, 111.; and Monroe T. Smock (40%), 
Filed June 21. 

KUBC Montrose, Colo. — Seeks acquisition of 
positive control of licensee corporation by George 
O. Cory and Wanda Lucille Cory through pur- 
chase of stock from Steward C. Lee and Eva C. 
Lee for $15,420. The Corys will now be sole own- 
ers of station. Filed June 21. 

WTOP-AM-FM-TV Washington, D. C— Seeks 
voluntary assignment of license to The Washing- 
ton Post Co. Corporate change. Filed June 21. 

WWPB Miami, Fla. — Seeks assignment of li- 
cense to WSKP Inc. for $160,000. Sole owner of 
WSKP Inc. is Ohio Music Corp. Principals are 
Pres. William O'Neil, 75% owner of Ohio Music 
Corp.; and Vice Pres. J. W. Lemmon, 25% owner 
of Ohio Music Corp. Filed June 21. 

KWLT Lebanon, Mo. — Seeks voluntary acquisi- 
tion of negative control of licensee corp. by 
O. R. Wright through purchase of stock from 
Frances R. Fields. Mr. Wright, general mgr. -33. 3% 
owner of Lebanon Publishing Co., will hold 50% 
interest. Filed June 21. 

KLAS-TV Las Vegas, Nev. — Seeks voluntary 
acquisition of affirmative control of permittee 
corp. by Herman M. Greenspun. Mr. Greenspun 
will hold 67.52%. Filed June 21. 

KSHO-TV Las Vegas, Nev. — Seeks assignment 
of cp to C&Z. Sole owner Mortiz Zenoff is going 
into partnership with Wilbur Clark, owner of 
Desert Inn, who is buying 50% interest. Mr. 
Zenoff also owns KBMI Henderson, Nev. Filed 
June 21. 

WMTR Morristown, N. J. — S«=eks involuntary 
transfer of control to George S. Croy, Kenneth A. 
Croy and Horace C. Jeffers, executors and trus- 
tees U/W James R. Croy, deceased, formerly 
25% owner of station. Filed June 21. 

WHAM-AM-TV, WHFM (FM) Rochester, N. Y. 
— Seeks assignment of license to Transcontinent 
Television Corp. Application is filed for purpose 
of having Stromberg-Carlson authorizations as- 
signed to Transcontinent upon consummation of 
transfer from General Dynamics. Assignment will 
permit Transcontinent to be direct licensee and.by 
eliminating wholly-owned subsidiary, will result 
in simplified corporate organization. Filed June 21. 

WHUM-AM-TV Reading, Pa.— Seeks transfer of 
61% interest from Paul A. Plickinger et/al to 
Jessie P. Greig et/al as voting trustees. Filed 
June 25. 

WICE Providence, R. I. — Seeks assignment of li- 
cense to Providence Radio Inc. for $60,000. Prin- 
cipal is Akron Bcstg. Corp. (80% ), which operates 
WCTJE Akron, Ohio. Filed June 21. 

WPAL Charleston, S. C. — Seeks assignment of 
license to Speidel-Fisher Bcstg. Corp. of Charles- 
ton for $111,000. Principals are equal owners 
Albert T. Fisher Jr. and Joe Speidcl III. Speidel- 
Fisher owns and operates WOIC Columbia, S. C, 
and owns 75% of WQOK Greenville, S. C. Filed 
June 21. 



WDXB Chattanooga, Tenn. — Seeks assignment 
of license to French Inc. for $100,000. Principals 
are Carlin S. French (90%), 22% owner of H-R 
Representatives Inc., 33.3% owner of WATO Oak 
Ridge, Tenn., and 10% owner of WLAF Lafollette, 
Tenn., and Stephen C. French (10%), manager of 
WNOE New Orleans. Filed June 21. 

WKTF Warrenton, Va. — Seeks assignment of 
cp to WKTF Inc. Station is being assigned by 
Oliver M. and Martha Rountree Presbrey as 
partners of Old Dominion Bcstg. Co. in considera- 
tion of issuance to them of 20 shares each of 
common voting stock of WKTF Inc., together 
with agreement of Northern Va. Broadcasters 
Inc., which will hold 50% interest, that it will 
loan up to $15,000 to WKTF Inc. for construction 
and operation of station. Principals include 
Martha Rountree Presbrey (25%), 100% owner 
of Rountree-Presbrey Productions Inc.; Oliver M. 
Presbrey (25%), and Northern Virginia Broad- 
casters Inc. (50%). Northern Va. operates WARL- 
AM-FM Arlington, Va., and is owned by Cy 
Blumenthal. Filed June 21. 

KTEL Walla Walla, Wash.— Seeks acquisition of 
control of licensee corporation by Jack Keating 
through purchase of 60% interest from Harold C. 
and Estelle F. Singleton for $53,900. Mr. Keating 
will be sold owner. Filed June 25. 

Hearing Cases . . . 

OTHER ACTIONS 

Palatka, Fla. — FCC ordered that initial decision 
which looked toward grant of application of 
Raymac Inc. for new am to be operated on 800 
kc, 1 kw D, in Palatka, shall not become final, 
pending further review by FCC. Granted June 
21. 

WWBZ Vineland, N. J.— FCC granted petition 
by Community Bcstg. Service Inc. for authority 
to continue temporary operation of WWBZ for 
period of 60 days from and after action (1) by 
FCC on WWBZ petition to vacate and set aside 
Commission Nov. 28, 1955, decision denying re- 
newal application, and to reopen record, or (2) 
by U. S. Court of Appeals on WWBZ appeal, 
whichever is later. Action June 21. 

Routine Roundup . . . 

June 21 Decisions 

Broadcast Actions 

By the Commission 

Actions of June 20 

Following were granted renewal of licenses 
on regular basis: WMIN St. Paul, Minn.; WPBC 
Minneapolis, Minn.; KFSC Denver, Colo. 

June 21 Applications 

Accepted for Filing 
License to Cover Cp 

WCUM Cumberland, Md. — Seeks license to 
cover cp which authorized change in ant.-trans. 
and studio locations. 

WCED DuBois, Pa. — Seeks license to cover 
cp which authorized change in frequency; in- 
crease in power; installation of DA-2, and change 
in trans, location. 

WEAT-TV West Palm Beach, Fla.— Seeks li- 
cense to cover cp which authorized new tv. 

Modification of Cp 

KDIS The Dalles, Ore.— Seeks mod. of cp 
(which authorized new am) for extension of com- 
pletion date. 

Renewal of Licenses 
KITE-FM San Antonio, Tex.; WNYE (FM) 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



NEGOTIATOR 
FOR THE 
PURCHASE AND 
SALE OF 
RADIO AND 
TELEVISION 
STATIONS 




Renewal of License Returned 
KFCA Phoenix, Ariz. (Improperly dated.) 

June 22 Decisions 

ACTIONS ON MOTIONS 
By Chief Hearing Examiner 
James D. Cunningham 
Hearings — Ordered that hearings will commence 
on dates shown in following am matters. South 
Dade Bcstg. Co., J. M. Pace and Redland Bcstg. 
Co., Homestead, Fla., on Sept. 11; Paul A. Brandt, 
West Branch, Mich., and Livingston Bcstg. Co., 
Howell, Mich., on Sept. 12; Claremore Bcstg. Co., 
Claremore, Okla.; WGLI Inc., Babylon, N. Y., both 
on Sept. 13. Action June 20. 

Princess Anne Bcstg. Corp., Virginia Beach, Va. 
— Granted petition for dismissal without prejudice 
of its am application. Action June 21. 

By Hearing Examiners 

James D. Cunningham and H. Gifford Irion 

KSTN Stockton, Calif. — Granted petition to ex- 
tent that it requests continuance of hearing 
re its am application; on Hearing Examiner's own 
motion, ordered that hearing is continued to date 
which will be specified by subsequent order. 
Action June 20. 

By Hearing Examiner Elizabeth C. Smith 

WEBB Baltimore, Md. — Ordered that prehearing 
conference will be held at 2 p.m., June 29, re am 
application of WEBB. 

Terra Haute; Salem, Ind. — Ordered that pre- 
hearing conference will be held June 26, re am 
applications of Citizens Bcstg. Co., Terre Haute, 
and Salem Bcstg. Co., Salem. Action June 20. 
By Hearing Examiner Herbert Sharfman 

WTAO Cambridge, Mass. — On oral request of 
counsel for Broadcast Bureau and without ob- 
jection by other parties, ordered that prehearing 
conference now scheduled for June 21 is con- 
tinued to June 25, re am applications of WTAO. 
Action June 20. 

By Hearing Examiner Hugh B. Hutchison 

Pateros-Brcwster Tv Assn., Brewster Wash. — 
Granted motion for extension of time from June 
25 to July 14 to file proposed findings of fact 
and conclusions in matter of cease and desist 
order to be directed against Pateros-Brewster. 
Action June 20. 

By Hearing Examiner Basil P. Cooper 

WCHS-TV Charleston, W. Va— Granted petition 
to reschedule hearing now scheduled for July 16 
re its application for mod. of cp; hearing is re- 
scheduled and will begin July 11. Action June 20. 

June 25 Applications 

Accepted for Filing 
Modification of Cp 

WNYC-FM New York, N. Y.— Seeks mod. of 
cp (which replaced expired cp, which authorized 
changes in licensed station) for extension of com- 
pletion date. 

WJLN-TV Birmingham, Ala. — Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

KTRB-TV Modesto, Calif.— Seeks mod. of cp for 
extension of completion date. 

WSTF (TV) Stanford, Conn. — Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

WQIK-TV Jacksonville, Fla. — Seeks mod. of 
cp for extension of completion date. 

WEAL-TV Orlando, Fla. — Seeks mod. of cp for 
extension of completion date. 

WPTV (TV) Ashland, Ky. — Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

WPFA-TV Pensacola, Fla. — Seeks mod. of cp 
(which authorized new tv) for extension of com- 
pletion date. 

WFTV (TV) Duluth, Minn. — Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

KINY-TV Anchorage, Alaska — Seeks mod. of 
cp for extension of completion date. 

KCOA (TV) Corona, Calif. — Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

WALB-TV Albany, Ga.— Seeks mod. of cp for 
extension of completion date. 

WHFC-TV Chicago, 111. — Seeks mod. of cp for 
extension of completion date. 

WTRI (TV) Albany, N. Y.— Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

WINR-TV Binghamton, N. Y. — Seeks mod. of 
cp for extension of completion date. 

WTLF (TV) Baltimore, Md. — Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

WMCN (TV) Grand Rapids, Mich.— Seeks mod. 
of cp for extension of completion date. 

WHCU-TV Ithaca, N. Y.— Seeks mod. of cp for 
extension of completion date. 

WTVX (TV) Gastonia, N. C. — Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

WHK-TV Cleveland, Ohio — Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. , 

WTVG (TV) Mansfield, Ohio— Seeks mod. of 
cp for extension of completion date. 

WKDN-TV Camden, N. J.— Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

WPTR-TV Albany, N. Y. — Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

WCBF-TV Rochester, N. Y.— Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

WAZL-TV Hazelton, Pa. — Seeks mod. of cp for 
extension of completion date. 

WBNY-FM Buffalo, N. Y.— Seeks mod. of cp 
(which authorized changes in licensed station) 
for extension of completion date. 

(Continues on page 108) 



Page 102 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



PROFESSIONAL CARDS 



JANSKY & BAILEY INC. 

ixecutive Offices 

1735 Oe Sales St., N. W. ME. 8-5411 
Offices and Laboratories 

1339 Wisconsin Ave., N. W. 
Washington, D. C. ADoms 4-2414 

Member AFCCE * 



Commercial Radio Equip. Co. 

Everett L. Dillard, Gen. Mgr. 
INTERNATIONAL BLDG. Dl. 7-1319 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
P. O. BOX 7037 JACKSON 5302 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Member AFCCE* 



Frank H. Mclntcsh & Assocs. 

CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS 
1216 WYATT BLDG. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Metropolitan 8-4477 

Member AFCCE' 



KEAR & KENNEDY 

1302 18th St., N. W. Hudson 3-9000 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 

Member AFCCE* 



LYNNE C. SMEBY 

CONSULTING ENGINEER AM-FM-TV 

4806 MONTGOMERY LANE 
WASHINGTON 14, D. C. 
OLiver 2-8520 



ROBERT L. HAMMETT 

CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEER 

821 MARKET STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIFORNIA 
SUTTER 1-7545 



G. ROUNTREE, JR. 

5622 Dyer Street 
EMerson 3266 
Dallas 6, Texas 



JAMES C. McNARY 
Consulting Engineer 
National Press Bldg., Wash. 4, D. C. 
Telephone District 7-1205 

Member AFCCE* 



A. D. RING & ASSOCIATES 

30 Years' Experience in Radio 
Engineering 

Pennsylvania Bldg. Republic 7-2347 
WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 

Member AFCCE* 



RUSSELL 


P. MAY 


711 14th St., N. W. 


Sheraton Bldg. 


Washington 5, D. C. 


REpublic 7-3984 


Member 


AFCCE * 



A. EARL CULLUM, JR. 

CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS 
INWOOD POST OFFICE 
DALLAS 9, TEXAS 
JUSTIN 6108 

Member AFCCE* 



GEO. P. ADAIR ENG. CO. 

Consulting Engineers 

Radio-Television 
Communications-Electronics 
1610 Eye St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Executive 3-1230 Executive 3-5851 

Member AFCCE* 



JOHN B. HEFFELFINGER 

8401 Cherry St. Hiland 4-7010 

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 



VIR N. JAMES 

SPECIALTY 
Directional Antenna Proofs 
Mountain and Plain Terrain 
1316 S. Kearney Skyline 6-6113 

Denver 22, Colorado 



— Established 1926 — 
PAUL GODLEY CO. 

Upper Mentclair, N. J. Pilgrim 6-3000 
Laboratories, Great Notch, N. J. 

Member AFCCE* 



GAUTNEY & JONES 

CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS 
1052 Warner Bldg. National 8-7757 
Washington 4, D. C. 
Member AFCCE* 



WELDON & CARR 

Consulting 

Radio & Television 
Engineers 

Washington 6, D. C. Dallas, Texas 

1001 Conn. Ave. 4212 S. Buckner Blvd. 
Member AFCCE* 



GUY C. HUTCHESON 

P. O. Box 32 CRestview 4-8721 

1100 W. Abram 
ARLINGTON, TEXAS 



WALTER F. KEAN 

AM-TV BROADCAST ALLOCATION 

FCC & FIELD ENGINEERING 
1 Riverside Road — Riverside 7-2153 
Riverside, III. 
(A Chicago suburb) 



Vandivere, 
Cohen & Wearn 

Consulting Electronic Engineers 
612 Evans Bldg. NA. 8-2698 

1420 New York Ave., N. W. 
Washington 5, D. C. 



JOHN H. MULLANEY 

Consulting Radio Engineers 

2000 P St., N. W. 
Washington 6, D. C. 

Adams 4-6393 



SERVICE DIRECTORY 



COMMERCIAL RADIO 
MONITORING COMPANY 

PRECISION FREQUENCY 
MEASUREMENTS 
A FULL TIME SERVICE FOR AM-FM-TV 
P. O. Box 7037 Kansas City, Mo. 

Phone Jackson 3-5302 



CAPITOL RADIO 
ENGINEERING INSTITUTE 

Accredited Technical Institute Curricula 
3224 16th St., N.W., Wash. 10, D. C. 

Practical Broadcast, TV, Electronics engi- 
neering home study and residence courses. 
Write For Free Catalog, specify course. 



SPOT YOUR FIRM'S NAME HERE, 
To Be Seen by 77,440* Readers 

— among them, the decision-making 
station owners and managers, chief 
engineers and technicians— applicants 
for am, fm, tv and facsimile facilities 
* 1956 ARB Continuing Readership Study 



GEORGE C. DAVIS 

501-514 Munsey Bldg. STerling 3-0111 
Washington 4, D. C. 

Member AFCCE* 



Lohnes & Culver 

MUNSEY BUILDING DISTRICT 7-8215 
WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 

Member AFCCE* 



PAGE, CREUTZ, 
STEEL & WALDSCHMITT, INC. 

Communications Bldg. 
710 14th St., N. W. Executive 3-5670 
Washington 5, D. C. 
303 White Henry Stuart Bldg. 
Mutual 3280 Seattle. 1, Washington 

Member AFCCE* 



ROBERT M. SILLIMAN 

John A. Moffet — Associate 
1405 G St., N. W. 
Republic 7-6646 
Washington 5, D. C. 
Member AFCCE* 



WILLIAM E. BENNS, JR. 
Consulting Radio Engineer 

3738 Kanawha St., N. W., Wash., D. C. 
Phone EMerson 2-8071 
Box 2468, Birmingham, Ala. 
Phone 6-2924 

Member AFCCE* 



CARL E. SMITH 

CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS 

4900 Euclid Avenue 
Cleveland 3, Ohio 
HEnderson 2-3177 

Member AFCCE * 



LOWELL R. WRIGHT 

Aeronautical Consultant 

serving the radio & tv industry 
on aeronautical problems created 

by antenna towers 
Munsey Bldg., Wash. 4, D. C. 
District 7-1740 
(nights-holidays telephone 
Herndon, Va. 114) 



A. E. TOWNE ASSOCS., INC. 

TELEVISION and RADIO 
ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS 

420 Taylor St. 
San Francisco 2, Calif. 
PR. 5-3100 




Member AFCCE * 



Broadcasting • Telecasti 



ng 



July 2, 1956 • Page 10- 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Payable vn advance. Checks and money orders only. 

Deadline: Undisplayed — Monday preceding publication date. Display — Tuesday 
preceding publication date. 

Situations Wanted 20tf per word — $2.00 minimum • Help Wanted 25tf per word — 
$2.00 minimum. 

All other classifications 30tf per word — $U-00 minimum • Display ads $15.00 per inch 
No charge for blind box number. Send box replies to 
Broadcasting • Telecasting, 1735 DeSales St. N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 

Apw icants. : If transcriptions or bulk packages submitted. $1.00 charge for mailing (Forward remittance 
separately, please). All transcriptions, photos, etc., sent to box numbers are sent at owner's risk. Broadcart- 
iNfi • Telecasting expressly repudiates any liability or responsibility for their custody or return. 



RADIO 



Help Wanted 



Managerial 



Manager-sales manager . . . successful small 
market 1 kw daytimer needs your services. This 
is just the opportunity some young broadcaster 
has been looking for. Tell us why you're the 
man for the job and what you'll cost us. Box 
910G, B-T. 



We have an outstanding opportunity and situation 
to offer a capable sales manager, or assistant, who 
is also a hard hitting salesman. We are second 
to none in the Detroit area. Box 944G, B»T. 



Sales manager — five figure earnings and excep- 
tional future for a "front-line" sales manager 
(who can sell, hire and inspire) with major in 
New England. Write full please. Box 945G, B«T. 



Sales manager: If you can sell radio, why work 
for salary and commission alone? Acquire 
ownership through your efforts, too. We have it 
for you. Box 976G, B«T. 



Assistant manager-program director. Top Hooper 
station Capital City — Jackson, Mississippi. Race 
programming. Executive position open immedi- 
ately for ambitious, imaginative, intelligent young 
man 24-32 who wants to move up to manager 
with rapidly expanding organization. No clock- 
watchers. Best salaries in state. Southerner 
preferred. Send complete resume, photo, and 
references first letter or application will not be 
considered. John McLendon, WOKJ, Box 2667, 
Jackson, Miss. 



Salesmen 



Salesman who can sell. Box 850G, B-T. 



Experienced salesman capable of becoming com- 
mercial manager successful small market opera- 
tion . . . able to make good written sales pres- 
entation and brochures . . . state related abilities. 
Forward complete details with photo and refer- 
ences. Salary $100.00 weekly minimum guaran- 
teed. Box 905G, B«T. 



Chicagoland's fastest growing station desires 
contact with mature, experienced salesman who 
can show proven record and who wants stability 
and high income potential. Please give all in- 
formation in first letter. Box 954G, B-T. 



Need experienced salesman, versatile all phases 
250 watt indie, southwest. Excellent opportunity. 
Box 978G, B«T. 



Immediate opening radio salesman in 5000 watt 
San Joaquin Valley independent. $380 guaran- 
tee. Commission. Send photo, sales, and radio 
experience first letter. KCHJ, P.O. Box 262, De- 
lano, California. 



Wanted — reliable live wire .experienced, aggres- 
sive radio salesman, good future for right man. 
KCMC-Radio, Texarkana, Tex.-Ark. 



Very good opportunity and plan for steady, solid 
salesman with limited announcing. Adequate 
guarantee. KHBG, Okmulgee, Okla. 



RADIO 



Help Wanted— (Cont'd) 



Salesmen 



Experienced salesman. Attractive offer to right 
man. 1000 watt fulltime independent. Contact 
Manager, KOKX, Keokuk, Iowa. 



Expanding our facilities. Need experienced radio 
time salesman, excellent area station. Our staff 
knows about this. WESO, Southbridge, Mass. 



Expanding Indiana independent has good oppor- 
tunity for experienced salesman. If you are 
content with just average earnings, this isn't for 
you. If you want to build your income along 
with growing business in this station, located in 
the fastest growing market in Indiana. Send 
complete resume and photo to Ken Kilmer, 
WMRI, Marion, Indiana. 



Wanted: Experienced salesman! Good salary plus 
incentive pay and car expense. Contact Don 
Wirth, WNAM, Neenah, Wisconsin. 



1st class engineer who needs practically no 
maintenance, with experience as an announcer 
(good voice a necessity), who will only be sched- 
uled 3 or 4 hours a day on announcer duty, op- 
erating own control panel, and be expected to 
devote half day to selling. Starting salary $75 
to $90 weekly plus 15% commission on sales. 
Radio Station WRNY, Rochester, N. Y. 



Salesman's dream! Build your way because we 
believe your success is ours. Definite salary. 
No draw or backlogs. (You never owe us any- 
thing). Plus commissions or billing bonuses for 
billing over $2,000 a month. Up to 25% commis- 
sion for all over $3,600 billing a month. Plus 
bonuses on every order or contract turned in, up 
to $75 bonus per sale. Plus vacation bonus up to 
$250. Plus profit sharing bonus up to $1,000 or 
more. Good producer in first year should net 
many hundreds over salary; Second year many 
thousands. Tell us about yourself when you 
write for "Salesman Plan" to one of America's 
most successful independent stations . . . WSNY, 
Schenectady, New York. 



Southeast radio station needs experienced time 
salesman — opportunity for advancement for man 
who will produce. Salary and commission. Write 
John G. Williams, P. O. Box 336, Savannah, 
Georgia. 



Announcer salesman with sufficient ability to 
take over managers position within six months. 
Send audition tape to: Skyline Network, Box 
362. Tupelo, Mississippi. 



Announcers 



Good announcer-copywriter . . . Must excel in 
both. Successful small market operation. Experi- 
enced in both preferred. Send all details includ- 
ing expected starting salary. Box 907G, B«T. 



Minnesota station needs news director. Good 
salary. Must be good announcer and able to 
type. Box 916G, B-T. 



Announcer, first class license for new Alabama 
daytimer. Best equipment, ideal working condi- 
tions. Give complete information first letter. 
Box 921G, B«T. 



RADIO 



Help Wanted— (Cont'd) 



Announcers 



Negro rock and roll announcer wanted at once. 
Send audition tape, disc, all information about 
self first letter. Box 958G, B-T. 



Top-flight announcer — DJ personality, experi- 
enced all phases radio wanted by Pennsylvania 
network affiliate. If you can deliver, bright, 
warm, personality-type show and come up with 
the audience, here's permanent position at $95 
weekly with insurance, hospital, and sickness 
benefits plus liberal vacation plan. Only those 
presently employed with successful record to 
be considered. Beginners do not apply. Send 
full particulars and tape with first letter to Box 
966G, B-T. 



Announcer, DJ, strong air salesman, independ- 
ent Washington, D. C. Profit sharing, morning. 
Box 967G, B»T. 



Midnight to 6 a.m. Station in million midwest 
market needs announcer-salesman. Salary plus 
commission on sales. Send complete details, no 
tapes, Box 991G, B»T. 



Announcer with first class ticket for KCHS, Truth 
or Consequences, New Mexico. Contact Tynes, 
Box 122, Albuquerque. 



Wanted — good reliable experienced announcer, 
250 watt ABC affiliate. Good permanent position 
to right man with good references. Send tape 
and backgrounl. KCMC-Radio, Texarkana, Tex.- 
Ark. 



Established kilowatt daytimer needs reliable, 
competent salesman immediately. Contact Bob 
Morey, KDKD, Clinton, Missouri. 



We need an adult announcer that sounds like an 
adult . . . fulltime indie in Hastings. Nebraska, 
heavy on sports ... If you are "recent gradu- 
ate of leading announcing school, can operate 
board" type, please don't take our time . . . 
will pay good, living wage, must be experienced. 
Must know how to really sell a commercial. Rush 
tape and pertinant data to: Dave Martin, KHAS, 
Radio, Hastings, Nebraska. 



Need two good, experienced announcers. One 
news, one staff. Staff must be DJ personality, 
good at ad lib and commercials. 125,000 popula- 
tion market. Top money for the right man. 
Airmail tape and letter to Larry Getchell, KLIN 
Radio, Lincoln, Nebraska. 



Combo man, first phone, night shift. No engineer- 
ing, salary no object for right man. Send tape 
and resume to Fred Epstein, KSTT, Davenport, 
Iowa. 



Immediate opening for announcer-salesman, an- 
nouncer-copywriter, announcer-program direc- 
tor. Better than average for right man. Good 
Virginia job. Must be above average, for grow- 
ing, independent daytimer. If interested . . if 
good . . you know what to do. WBCR, Box 96, 
Christiansburg, Virginia. 



Announcer, minimum one year's experience, tape, 
letter, photo to WBTN, Bennington, Vermont. 



Sports minded 5,000 watt independent needs ex- 
perienced announcer immediately to handle all 
local play-by-play sports. Must have good refer- 
ences. Contact Greeley N. Hilton, Manager, 
WBUY, Lexington, N. C. 



Announcer-news writer needed shortly Journal- 
istic background desirable but experience in 
radio news work plus good delivery acceptable 
as substitute. Please send tape, resume and 
photograph. Permanent job for right man. Reply 
to L. T. Pitman, WCSH, Portland, Maine. 



Immediately: Experienced announcer, 1st class 
ticket preferred for daytime independent. Send 
tape, photo, resume, salary requirement. WESO, 
Southbridge, Mass. 



Announcer — DJ for pop, hillbilly and news with 
good commercial delivery. Must be dependable 
and permanent. Need top man. Good opportunity 
for advancement. Good pay to right man. Send 
resume and tape immediately. All tapes returned. 
John Garrison. WFUN, Huntsville, Alabama. 



Staff announcer. Rural station near Washington, 
D. C. Salary commensurate with ability, experi- 
ence. Rush tape, photo, resume. WKIK, Leonard- 
town, Maryland. 



Help wanted — immediate opening for radio an- 
nouncer with at least four years experience. Five 
day week, excellent working conditions, forty 
miles from New York City. Send complete resume 
including salary expected, plus tape and picture 
to WLNA, Peekskill, New York. 



Immediate opening at kilowatt daytimer in 
eastern Pennsylvania for experienced staff an- 
nouncer with possibilities for advancement to 
assistant manager, near future. Station is one of 
growing chain. 40 hour week with overtime pay 
talent fees. Paid vacations. Applicants must have 
car. Reply by phone immediately or send 
complete resume, tape, and photo to manager, 
WLSH, Lansford, Pa. 



HELP WANTED 
CALIFORNIA RADIO-TV STATION 

VHF Network TV Station and Radio Station — Commercial operation needs help immedi- 
ately in all departments, located in ideal small market on California coast. Outstanding 
organization, room for advancement. These newest openings were brought about by our 
extensive expansion. Send photo, complete details to: 

Box 997G, B«T 



Page 104 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



RADIO 



RADIO 



RADIO 



Help Wanted— (Cont'd) Help Wanted— (Cont'd) 



Announcers 



Opening-July 15th for announcer, strong on news 
and commercials. Independent 500 watt. Heavy 
local news and music format. Possible to go to 
college parttime, three men have completed 
entire college career by working for us. Airmail 
training and experience record, photo and tape 
to Bill Baker, Program Director, WMIK, Mid- 
dlesboro, Kentucky. 



Top rated kilowatt independent needs staff man 
to replace announcer entering college. Complete 
resume and tapes received by WMIX, Mt. 
Vernon, Illinois. 



Wanted: Experienced announcer. Must be family 
man. Job permanent to right person. Send com- 
plete resume, tape and salary requirements first 
letter. WMLT, Dublin, Georgia. 



Top calibre announcer wanted by 5000 watt CBS 
radio-tv affiliate in metropolitan southeastern 
market. Must be well experienced in all-around 
staff work. Good starting salary commensurate 
with ability. We want steady, qualified an- 
nouncer. Send taoe, photo, and letter to WRDW 
Radio, Augusta, Georgia. 



Announcer with first class license for new news 
music station. WSHE, Sheboyan, Wisconsin. 



Announcer 1st class engineer, with emphasis on 
announcing, excellent opportunity for advance- 
ment. Send audition tape to: Skyline Network, 
Box 362, Tupelo, Mississippi. 



Technical 



Engineer, with first class phone for 50 kw radio 
and/or maximum power VHF with color. Contact 
Box 874G, B-T. 



First class chief engineer: Maintenance and im- 
provement . . . first requirement. Mobile and 
stationary remote work mandatory. Air work 
fine but secondary. Salary above average. Box 
888G, B»T. 



Combo man with first class license. Permanent 
job with clean operation. Salary $85 to $100. Box 
908G, B-T. 



Chief engineer-announcer capable putting new 
California 500 watt directional am or air. Must be 
good. Box 972G, B-T. 



Chief engineer — announcer for southern 250. Ex- 
cellent working conditions. Present chief with 
us 10 years. Must know engineering and furnish 
best of references. Salary open. Drunks or 
floaters don't apply. Box 955G, B-T. 



Engineer, first phone: Manage Washington, D. C, 
independent. Experienced only. Box 968G, B-T. 



Chief engineer with directional array experience 
for 5 kw fulltime Houston, Texas independent. 
Very few hours required on board. Mostly 
studio and transmitter maintenance. Good start- 
ing salary, hospitalization, Christmas bonus and 
merit raises. Full details first letter. Box 969G, 
B-T. 



Chief engineer-announcer for 250 watt daytime. 
Must be strong on announcing. $85 for 48 hours 
to start. Rush picture, tape and details. Box 
984G, B-T. 



Chief engineer, prefer man who can also an- 
nounce, permanent position, KGHF, Pueblo, 
Colorado. 



Wanted engineer with 1st class FCC license. Abil- 
ity to sell or announce helpful but no essential. 
Above average pay. KVWO Radio. Daytime Net- 
work. William T. Kemp, Box 926, Cheyenne, 
Wonderful, Wyoming. 



Permanent first class transmitter engineer, no 
announcing, no experience necessary. WAMS, 
Wilmington, Delaware. 



First class engineer-announcer capable of main- 
tenance. Can be local newsman if qualified. 
Contact Manager, WDLC, Port Jervis, New York. 
Phone: 3-2293. 



1st class ticket. Announcing chores optional. 
Beautiful area, good place for home and family. 
Need immediately. Call or send resume with 
salary requirement. WESO, Southbridge, Mass. 



Immediate opening 1st phone engineers. Contact 
Frank Laughlin, WGEM-AM-FM-TV, Channel 10, 
NBC-ABC, Quincy, Illinois. 



Transmitter operator. Any inquiries may be di- 
rected to the attention of W. H. Malone, Radio 
Station WGTM, Wilson, N. C. 



Wanted: Radio engineer; first class radio-tele- 
phone license; strong on maintenance. No op- 
erating tricks. 40 hours. Apply Chief Engineer, 
Radio Station WRIV, 1 East Main Street, River- 
head, Long Island, N. Y. 



Programming-Production, Others 



Program director-announcer with good voice and 
realistic programming ability. Must be creative 
and able to develope programming with sell 
appeal . . . based on news, music and local pub- 
lic service. Send complete details. This is a small 
market operation that's successful. Tell us what 
you'll work for. Box 906G, B-T. 



Gal Friday. Practical woman broadcaster to 
handle continuity and do some air work. 1 kw 
daytimer in small market. Box 909G B-T. 



Wanted: Combo program director and sports an- 
nouncer. Fulltime station in midwest extremely 
heavy sports sked. Must know programming and 
be good at play-by-play, all sports normally 
carried by high school, plus heavy baseball. 
Send all tapes and info to Box 936G, B-T. 



Stringers wanted. Europe, Far East, Middle East, 
South America. Apply Box 985G, B-T. 



Newsman: Fulltime to gather, edit, and air news- 
casts. Also adlib remote news. Above average 
starting salaTy, with advancement. Bob Jenkins, 
Station Manager, KGFW, Kearney. 



Situations Wanted 



Managerial 



Manager, salesman, chief engineer. Well versed 
all phases. Available immediately. Best refer- 
ences. Box 854G, B-T. 



Manager — strong on sales, good programming, 
efficient operation. Mature man of long experi- 
ence. Good character and references. Prefer 
salary and percentage. Box 927G, B-T. 



Sales manager . . . good sales position — radio-tele- 
vision experienced. Excellent record. References 
from present employer. Self betterment change. 
Available immediately. Box 941G, B-T. 



Experienced, mature manager can improve your 
profit and business situation. Many proven sale- 
able ideas. Hard worker. Mature family man. 
Box 947G. B-T. 



Combination-manager, sales, program, copy, an- 
nounce — small market. Married. 35. Experienced 
— employed — permanence desire. Sober. Box 
948G, B-T. 



Attention! Large stations, network-indies, sta- 
tion reps. Thirty years agency, radio sales work. 
Experienced all phases radio sales, merchandis- 
ing. Agency, national account contacts. Good 
health. Will move. Presently employed. Desire 
greater potential. Outstanding references. Box 
974G. B-T. 



Salesmen 



Salesman, announcer-salesman, ten years sales 
experience, two year radio, college, married, 
familv. Prefer south. Permanent connection. 
Box 940G. B-T. 



A nnouncers 



Sales manager, .38, strong on radio and tv sales, 
production and promotion, wants job with future. 
Salary plus incentive. Veteran, family stable. 
Resume and references. Box 933G, B-T. 



Situations Wanted — (Cont'd) 



Announcers 



First phone, combo. Announce, DJ, news main- 
tenance. Now working midwest station, wish to 
relocate northeast or Florida. Box 949G, B-T. 



Hold it! — need a versatile deejay, personality, 
staff? I love work! Have broad pop music, artist 
knowledge. Know board, good adlib, smooth com- 
mercial delivery. (Highly trained Cambridge 
grad.) Box 951G, B-T. 



Top morning man — deejay — employed — wishes to 
relocate. Veteran — family. Box 959G, B-T. 



Recent broadcasting school graduate, good DJ, 
news, sports, board, tape. Box 962G, B-T. 



Stop here — young man, low on experience, high 
on ability. Looking for right position. Try me. 
Box 963G, B-T. 



Look — young man knocking at the door of radio. 
Will be an asset to any radio station and will 
easily be made into a personality disc jockey. 
Box 964G, B-T. 



Experienced announcer. Mature, reliable. Strong 
on news, commercials. Discontinuation tv on 5000 
watt am-fm station forces change. Seeking good 
market, northeast area. Box 971G, B-T. 



Announcing school grad. presently employed in 
Dixie, seeks position as a staff announcer in a 
station in N. Y.. N. J., Conn., or Penna. (any- 
where in northeast). DJ, board, write Box 977G, 
B-T. 



Top announcer on 5 kw, CBS station desires to 
relocate. Prefer deep south but all offers will be 
considered. Some experience in tv. Box 979G, 
B-T. 



Announcer, negro, here's a rocking show, light 
experience, tape available. Box 980G, B-T. 



Experienced staff announcer, two years, desires 
to relocate to permanent position, strong news, 
music, commercial selling, married, dependable, 
good references, third ticket. Box 981G, B-T. 



Experienced announcer, versatile DJ, smooth 
commercial deliverv. Immediately available. 
Tape. Box 982G, B-T. 



Commercial DJ, staff, some experience, strong 
in news, sports, board, excellent references, 
tape, will travel. Box 983G. B-T. 



Announcer-DJ. Young, single, vet., light on ex- 
perience. Desire permanent move. Heavy on 
music. State salary. Tape resume available. Box 
S86G. B.T. 



Negro announcer, disc jockey, college, radio 
school, continuity writer, light experience in 
metropolitan area-. Will travel. Box 987G, B-T. 



Outstanding sports announcer, excellent play-by- 
play baseball, basketball, football. No further 
advancement possible with present station. Good 
sports and special events interviews. Employer 
will give reference. Box 988G, B-T. 



Recent graduate Midwestern Broadcasting School. 
Age 24. single, veteran. Interested in all phases 
of radio. Experience, not wages, prime factor. 
Box 989G. B-T. 

Recent graduate Midwestern Broadcasting School. 
Age 25, single, veteran. Graduate University of 
Illinois. Tape sent on request. Box 990G. B-T. 

24, single, SRT graduate. 1 year experience. 
Strong on news, DJ and selling commercials. 
Write original copy, shows. Also guitarist— 
folksinger. Tape, resume, photo available. Box 
992G, B-T. 

Young announcer — currently working midwest 
station. Strong DJ, news. Prefer N. E. $70-75. Box 
993G, B-T. 



Reliable, vigorous staff announcer. 13 months 
experience. 3rd class ticket. Box 998G B-T. 

(Continued on next page) 



WDSU Radio is looking for experienced record personalities interested 
in good radio operation. Offering top salaries in South for brisk, bright, 
friendly personalities — No Comedians! Send tape, photo, background 
data to 

Hal Fredericks, WDSU Radio 

520 Royal Street, New Orleans 16, La. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 105 



RADIO 



RADIO 



TELEVISION 



Situations Wanted — (Cont'd) 



Announcers 



Well-trained announcer. Strong on commercials. 
Prefer midwest. Tape and resume on request. 
Burt Burdeen, 712 Waveland, Chicago. 



Tape talks. Will send audition tape upon your 
request. Recent radio-tv graduate at large uni- 
versity. Vet. AFRS (Korea). Experienced in 
news, sports, DJ, spot writing at university sta- 
tion. Know RCA, Gates, WE boards. Will locate 
anywhere. Prefer west of Rockies. Write, wire 
or phone collect. Sam H. Levinson, 3800 Cascadia 
Avenue, Seattle 18, Washington. 



Staff and sports announcer. 20 months experi- 
ence. Strong on news, commercials, music and 
play-by-play. Control board. Third ticket. Write: 
Glenn MaTtin, 1506 North Market Street, Fred- 
erick, Maryland. 



Colored female, personality show, announcing, 
women's director. Broadcast school graduate. 
Z. Palmer, 7948 S. Wabash, Chicago, Illinois. 



Announcer, 3 years DJ, commercials, sports. Any 
location available immediately. Barry Pfeffer, 
1973 Daly Ave., Bx, New York. 



Announcer: 6 months staff experience, includes 
play-by-play, single, vet, 24, reliable, no desire to 
float: Contact Frank Smith, Shelter Island, New 
York. Phone 9-0162M. 



Technical 



Announcer-engineer. First phone. Experienced. 
Versatile. Capable of chief engineer or program 
director. Mature and dependable. Box 946G, 
B-T. 



Engineer, first phone, 4 year am, 5 months uhf- 
tv. Experience as chief 1 kw am. Some announc- 
ing. Present position temporary. Desire perma- 
nent position near home on Florida west coast. 
Box 973G, B-T. 



First phone engineers available immediately. 
Grantham School of Electronics, 821 19th Street, 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 



Situations Wanted — (Cont'd) 



Programming-Production, Others 



Experienced program director . . . eleven years 
raxlio, four years PD. Desires change from 
metropolitan east coast station to southern Cali- 
fornia. Box 970G, B»T. 



TELEVISION 



Help Wanted 



Managerial 



Successful vhf television station in non-competi- 
tive market of smaller size in far west has im- 
mediate opening for aggressive local sales man- 
ager. Salary commensurate with ability to pro- 
duce. Our previous managers have all been 
promoted. Must have all details and proof of 
ability in first letter. Box 965G, B-T. 



Executive and staff positions. Expanding multiple 
ownership group operating radio and television 
stations in major and secondary markets inter- 
ested in reviewing applications immediately for 
all executive and staff positions. Box 995G, B»T. 



Salesmen 



Tv time salesman wanted: Must be experienced 
in tv or radio time selling. With fastest growing 
station in major western market. Liberal draw 
against commission. Box 996G, B«T. 



Television salesman. ABC affiliate — vhf — good 
markets — desire minimum 3 years in radio or 
television. Good weekly guarantee — excellent 
commission arrangement. Send resume, full de- 
tails, first letter, to Robert C. Miller, Sales Man- 
ager, KCRG-TV, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 



Announcers 



Announcers needed for new southeast vhf tele- 
vision station. Please send tape, photo and in- 
formation. Write Box 956G, B-T. 



Help Wanted— (Cont'd) 



Technical 



Assistant chief engineer in charge of television 
wanted by major southwestern vhf, prior ex- 
perience DuMont equipment a requisite. Reply 
Box 923G, B-T. 



Transmitter operator experienced in operation, 
maintenance, and trouble-shooting on RCA TT- 
10AL transmitter located near the coast at Corpus 
Christi, Texas. Apply Chief Engineer, KRIS-TV. 



California VHF network small market tv stations 
need qualified experienced tv-radio engineers 
with first class tickets — operation and mainte- 
nance due to expansion program. Prefer versatile 
men who like smaller towns and stations. In- 
clude photo and complete resume of all experi- 
ence, education and training. Also complete list 
of references first letter. Address Bill Hargan, 
Chief Engineer, KSBW-TV, P. O. 1651, Salinas, 
California. 



Engineer for position of assistant chief with pro- 
gressive 100 kw vhf. Must be capable of per- 
forming all operational and maintenance duties. 
Contact Chief Engineer. WJBF-TV, Atlanta, Ga. 



Programming-Production, Others 



Experienced continuity writer for large eastern 
network affiliate. Forward copy samples and com- 
plete resume with salary requirements. Box 
508G, B«T. 



Experienced news photographer for local sound 
and silent coverage. Must be able to process 
small amounts of news footage. Some newscast- 
ing experience helpful. State salary require- 
ments with resume. Box 509G, B-T. 



Key midwest vhf tv station wants outstanding 
producer-director. Must be experienced, creative 
and imaginative. Salary commensurate with abil- 
ity. Must have at least two years experience. 
Want a man anxious to try new ideas and new 
approaches to production. Photo and detailed 
background necessary. Box 920G, B-T. 



EXAMPLE 




PRACTICAL TV TRAINING 

NRTS STUDENTS 
DO REMOTE FROM 
MOVIE PREMIERE 
IN HOLLYWOOD 



Coming soon — 
"nothing but the 
facts". Watch 
for it, here. 



This is a typical example of the practicality of ALL 
Northwest training. These Hollywood students are 
actually doing a live remote from a recent movie 
premiere. All Northwest classes are trained using methods like these — letting 
students work in a practical manner with everyday Telecasting problems. For 
top TV people call John Birrel, Employment Counselor. 




Ml RITl'l WIC ^v T 

RADIO & TELEVISION 

SCHOOL 



HOME OFFICE: 



I 



1221 N. W. 21st Avenue 
Portland, Oregon »' CA 3-7246 



<A< ■ ■ : - . , 



HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 


1440 North Highland 






HO 4-7822 


CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. . . . 




540 N. Michigan Avenue 






DE 7-3836 


WASHINGTON, D. C. . . . 




1627 K Street N. W. 






RE 7-0343 



Page 106 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



TELEVISION 



FOR SALE 



WANTED TO BUY 



Help Wanted— (Cont'd) 



Programming-Production, Others 



Producer — medium market operation, southwest, 
excellent opportunity for man who can organize 
small staff. Network affiliate. Box 960G, B-T. 



Experienced director for midwest net affiliate. 
Medium-sized market. Should know RCA switch- 
er. Rush details to Box 975G, B-T. 



Commercial continuity writer for Michigan full 
power vhf. Rush resume to Box 994G, B-T. 



Traffic manager, vhf station, NBC-ABC — Michi- 
gan's second market. Male or female, above aver- 
age salary, excellent working conditions and 
benefits. Contact John J. Keenan, WNEM-TV, 
Bay City, Michigan. 



Situations Wanted 



Managerial 



Salesmanship, showmanship, profit. Veteran of 
12 years radio-tv sales, production, seeking 
permanent connection as tv station manager or 
assistant manager. Know-how, energy, enthusi- 
asm means a shirt-sleeves leader who gets things 
done. Now employed in executive capacity vhf 
top 50 markets. Box 943G, B.T. 



Technical 



Looking for C.E. who has spent past three years 
observing economical operation and produce, 
provide full authority given? Can you pay mini- 
mum $125.00 for nine years maintenance, opera- 
tion and supervision? Available after proper 
notice present employer. Box 953G, B'T. 



Programming-Production, Others 



Director-producer, 11 years' experience with 
major tv network as director, producer, camera- 
man, local film news and remotes. Knowledge 
of switching and producing commercials, live or 
film. Excellent references. Box 942G, B»T. 



Producer and tv director — 4 years experience. 
Creative, conscientious. Best references. Em- 
ployed northwest station. Seeking greater op- 
portunity. 31. College graduate. Resume return 
mail. Personal interview acceptable. Box 957G, 
B«T. 



FOR SALE 



Stations 



Well-established fm station with good back- 
ground music contract located on West Coast. 
Expansion imperative but owner lacks capital. 
Box 898G, B«T. 



Owner of CP for new am station cannot give per- 
sonal attention to it because of health. Will 
transfer CP and materials on hand for $5,300. 
New tower (not erected), good used transmitter, 
frequency monitor, microphones, transcription 
library, and record library. Necessary that in- 
terested parties act immediately. Wonderful op- 
portunity. Box 950G, B-T. 



Diversified and growing secondary market station 
in mid-south. Above average physical plant. 
Past, but not present, history of earnings, 
$100,000 price category. Substantial cash required. 
Paul H. Chapman Co., 84 Peachtree, Atlanta. 



California, $42,000, 29% down, isolated, single sta- 
tion, full; Mountain, lkw day, annual gross, 
terms; Mountain 5kw annual gross, full, terms; 
Midwest, $60,000. $18,000 down, below annual 
gross, single; Midwest, $60,000. $15,000 down, an- 
nual gross, single; Southeast, $150,000. Colored, 
annual gross terms; Midwest lOkw, day, $225,000, 
40% down; Midwest CP, plus equipment paid for, 
$22,000. List with Norman Company, Box 534, 
Davenport. Iowa. 



Write now for our free bulletin of outstanding 
radio and tv buys throughout the United States. 
Jack L. Stoll & Associates, 4958 Melrose Ave., 
Los Angeles 29, Calif. 



East Coast 250w fulltimer — independent combo 
operation in owned building. Gross 1955. $63,000. 
Asking $63,000, $21,000 down, 85,000 in receivables. 
See John Hanly. 



Eastern 2 station team — show good net — grossing 
about $135,000, asking $150,000 with 29% down. 
Both communities about 10,000 pop. with active 
business and industry. See John Hanly. 



Eastern 250w fulltimer grossing $125,000 — asking 
$150,000 with $50,000 down. See John Hanly. 



Stations 



Midwestern 250w fulltimer in larger market 
grossing about $65,000— asking $75,000. Buyer as- 
sumes $22,000 — balance mostly cash. See John 
Hanly. 



Eastern state lkw daytime indie. Studio and 
transmitter on 4V2 acres of company owned land. 
Billing $4,500 per month. Operating cost about 
$3,000 per month. Operating in black for past 
five years. Asking $60,000— all cash. See John 
Hanly. 



Information on many other excellent properties, 
from Maine to Florida, is available for inspection 
by qualified buyers. Complete and confidential 
service offered to owners and operators. Just 
write— John Hanly, Jack L. Stoll & Assoc., Colony 
Building, 1737 De Sales Street, N. W., Washington, 



Equipment 



485 ft. self-supporting heavy duty tower, lighting 
equipment and WE cloverleaf antenna. 3.55 
power gain. Sell complete or separate. Box 937G, 
B-T. 



lkw composite transmitter, replaced May 12th, 
1956. Best offer, KOLO, Reno. 



RCA BTA 250L transmitter in excellent con- 
dition. Spare tubes. All reasonable offers con- 
sidered. Contact Harry McAdams, KWEW, Hobbs, 
New Mexico. 



Stancil Hoffman minitape — new battery, new 
motor and battery charger, almost like new — 
best offer. WADK, Newport, R. I. 



250 watt. Western Electric am transmitter. Ex- 
cellent condition. Increasing power and will sell 
for $1,000, F.O.B. station. W. R. Guest, Jr., WPMP, 
Pascagoula, Mississippi. 



Used television equipment. Federal microwave 
STL — 2000mgs. Dual incoscope film chain — Du- 
Mont, with six usable camera tubes. Two Holmes 
16mm film projectors-TV 16. Many spare projec- 
tor parts included. Contact M. M. Burleson, 
WTTG, Washington, D. C. 



Commercial crystals: And new or replacement 
broadcast crystals for Bliley, Western Electric. 
RCA holders. Conelrad frequencies. Crystal re- 
grinding etc. Reasonable prices, fastest service — 
also station am monitor service. Over 20 years in 
the business! Eidson Electronic Company, Tem- 
ple, Texa-s. 



Tower — 300 foot, Blaw Knox H-40, self supporter. 



Stations 



All accounts services by the broker personally. 
Ralph Erwin. Broker, 1443 South Trenton, Tulsa. 



Licensed in every stale served. Texas, Okla- 
homa, Colorado, Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas. 
Ralph Erwin, Broker, 1443 South Trenton, Tulsa. 
CHerry 2-3944. 



Equipment 



Wanted to buy: 2 used 16mm television film pro- 
jectors, RCA or Eastman. Must be in top condi- 
tion. Contact Bill Hargan, Chief Engineer, 
KSBW-TV, P. O. 1651, Salinas, California. 



Rek-O-Kut B-16H turntable with console cabinet. 
William Kirk, 1197 Stout Street, Denver 4, Colo- 
rado. 



Tower, 270 feet. Modulation frequency monitors. 
Console. Box 606, Showlow, Arizona. 



INSTRUCTION 



FCC license training — correspondence or resi- 
dence. Resident classes held in Hollywood and 
Washington. Beginners get FCC 1st class license 
In 3 months. For details write Grantham School, 
Dept. B, 821 19th Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



FCC first phone license. Start immediately 
Guarantee coaching. Northwest Radio & Televi- 
sion School, Dept. B, 1627 K Street, N.W., Wash- 
ington, D.C. 



RADIO 



Help Wanted 



Salesmen 



\ CALIFORNIA CALLING YOU? If you're a hard- \ 

> hitting salesman with successful direct < 
^ sales experience and want to associate 

> with a top, independent, Southern Cali- i 

> fornia radio station in a major market, < 
* write complete resume in confidence. 

I Box 928G, BeT. < 



errectea two years, lower Kepair & Maintenance 
Service. Route #2. Box No. 270B. Menomonee 
Falls, Wisconsin. Phone 2941. 



WANTED TO BUY 



Stations 



Will buy station or CP down in Georgia or north 
Florida. Give complete information which will 
be treated confidentially. Box 885G. B-T. 

Exclusive brokerage service. Permanent offices 
in Texas and Oklahoma. Ralph Erwin, Broker, 
1443 South Trenton, Tulsa. 



BIG FUTURE IN AUSTRALIA 

for a First-class Announcer and Disc Jockey 
with the capacity to grasp a front-rank 
career in an expanding country. We are 
looking for a man with top-flight American 
experience and a proved capacity to SELL, 
preferably with his own shows; a man who 
can hold a nation-wide audience now and 
develop with us in television. (Television 
starts in Australia late this year). Appli- 
cants must be prepared to live in Australia 
for at least two years. Travelling expenses 
to Australia will be paid. Attractive salary 
and bonus. Box 859G, B»T. 



NOEMAC Seeking 

Top Dise Jockeys 

Noemac disc jockeys, in Dallas, Milwaukee, San Antonio, El Paso, 
Atlanta, Monroe and New Orleans, have been and are being promoted 
to key executive positions. If you're a top disc jockey with a fine 
voice, a "different" style or gimmicks, and want to find a future with 
America's largest group of independent radio stations, send audition 
tape to: 

Gordon McLendon 
2104 Jackson St. 
Dallas, Texas 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 2, 1956 • Page 107 



RADIO 


RADIO 


Help Wanted— (Cont'd) 


Situations Wanted 


Announcers 


Announcers 



FOR THE RECORD* 



ARE YOU THIS MAN? 

The man we are looking for is currently the 
Sales Manager or Assistant Manager of a 
small radio station. He's now looking to take 
over the number one spot in a small Midwest 
community. He's married, full of ideas, ener- 
getic and very sales minded. He'd be happy 
working with owners who know radio 
thoroughly and who want to build a man- 
agement team for several radio properties. 
He works well with people and has a warm 
and friendly "small town" personality. If 
you are this man tell us about yourself, 
your experience, salary and references. Let's 
have the facts with as little fantasy as 
possible. 

Box 91 6G, B»T 



? DISC-JOCKEYS f 
LOUISIANA 

Performers with a Capital P 



* 
* 

* 
* 



+ 
* 



I reiiumieid vviui a uapnai r + 

J We need men who can keep a top rating ^ 

jf — Employ gimmicks — Inject personality ■¥ 

* — Produce an entertaining show — and £ 

J Sound alive on the air. You will be with a * 

*• sharp music and news operation. Send * 

j tape, photo and brief history to Box 534, ^ 

3f Shreveport, Louisiana. 4f 

CAN YOU QUALIFY? 



§ Aggressive 10 Kilowatt full time radio y 

dropping network for independent for- § 

mat. Adding to staff which makes great ^ 

Tell us all about yourself including ex- § 

: perience, age, money, marital status with § 

^ a complete audition tape that samples £ 

^ Dee Jaying — News — Commercials. Write £ 

• Jim O'Neill, P. O. Box 1402, Wichita, $ 

j Kansas. & 

', -^r. 'S/-. '^>-. <~&-. o^?-. '^/~' K&i ■^y r - ~*Cs~- ^ 



opportunity for personalities who can 
deliver as a DJ not just an announcer. 



Auditions being held for top notch all 
around staff announcer. Excellent op- 
portunity with leading aggressive CBS 
station in Palm Springs, California. 
Experience in console operation and 
quality commercial delivery a neces- 
sity. Apply in person for audition in 
Palm Springs, La Fonda Hotel Sunday, 
July 8, starting at 2 P.M. 



Technical 



WANTED 

Chief Engineer 

Directional Antenna Experience New Sta- 
tion * Top Job For Bight Man Send Com- 
plete Besume and picture * WBBB Inc. 
P. 0. Box 91 Mt. Clemens, Mich. 



"ANNOUNCER" FOR HIRE 

Top man, with excellent selling voice and 
know how — available to give your station 
"another voice" at fraction of cost of regular 
employee — no social security, no "paid va- 
cations", never gets sick. 

He is your tape voice for commercials. Get 
new accounts with this new voice. Different 
voices available for competitive accounts. 
Inexpensive service for local stations. Min- 
imum cost is monthly order for 12 spots at 
$2 each, plus $2 handling and mailing charge. 
E. L,. Roskelley, Producer, Irving (Dallas), 
Texas. 



TELEVISION 



Help Wanted 



Technical 



KERO-TV 
1420 Truxtun Avenue 
Bakersfield, California 

STUDIO SUPERVISOR 

Need engineer capable assuming duties 
studio supervisor — strong maintenance 
background BCA equipment. Permanent 
position agressive VHF STN. Provide 
resume training, experience references, 
availability to Director Engineering. 



California Opportunity 

• Studio Technical Supervisor 

• Studio Technician 

Wire immediately 

KVIP Redding, Calif. 



FOR SALE 



Equipment 



TOWERS 

RADIO— TELEVISION 

Antennas — Coaxial Cable 

Tower Sales & Erecting Co. 
6100 N. E. Columbia Blvd., 
Portland 11, Oregon 



WANTED TO BUY 



Equipment 



| FM TRANSMITTER 

3 to 10 kw, complete, for cash. 
Send all details, condition and 
| price. Box 624G, B'T. 



(Continues from page 102) 

WAZL-FM Hazleton, Pa.— Seeks mod. of cp 
(which authorized changes in licensed station) for 
extension of completion date. 

KGW-TV Portland, Ore.— Seeks mod. of cp for 
extension of completion date. 

WTVQ (TV) Pittsburgh, Pa.— Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

WKJF-TV Pittsburgh, Pa.— Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

WACA-TV Camden, S. C— Seeks mod. of cp 
for extension of completion date. 

KNTJZ-TV Houston, Tex.— Seeks mod. of cp for 
extension of completion date. 

WOOK-TV Washington, D. C— Seeks mod. of cp 
for extention of completion date. 

KEPR-TV Pasco, Wash.— Seeks mod. of cp for 
extension of completion date. 

KIMA-TV Yakima, Wash. — Seeks mod. of cp for 
extension of completion date. 

License to Cover Cp 

WAGA-FM Atlanta, Ga. — Seeks license to cover 
cp which authorized changes in licensed station. 

KDKA-FM Pittsburgh, Pa.— Seeks license to 
cover cp which authorized changes in licensed 
station. 

Renewal of Licenses 
KGAS Carthage, Tex.; KMCO Conroe, Tex.; 
KXOL Fort Worth, Tex.; KVKM Monahans, Tex.; 
WWHI (FM) Muncie, Ind. 

Renewal of Licenses Returned 
KTXJ Jasper, Tex. (Signed by Gen. Mgr.); 
KRCC (FM) Colorado Springs, Colo. (Improperly 

filed.) 



June 26 Decisions 

BROADCAST ACTIONS 

By the Broadcast Bureau 

Actions of June 22 

WGBB Freeport, N. Y.— Granted authority to 
operate trans, by remote control from 44 S. Grove 
St. 

KHUM Eureka, Calif. — Granted license cover- 
ing change of facilities, installation of DA-N and 
change trans, location. 

WPNX Columbus, Ga. — Granted license to 
cover cp which authorized P-A-N and charge 
trans, and studio locations. 

WSTL Eminence, Ky. — Granted license for am 
station. 

KHIL Fort Lupton, Colo. — Granted license for 
am station. 

WRLD Lanett, Ala. — Granted license to cover 
cp to replace expired cp which authorized 
changes in ant. system. 

WFBF Fernandina Beach, Fla. — Granted license 



SERVICES 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Laurence News Features proudly an- 
nounces three of America's top news and 
music stations are the latest outlets to 
engage our corps of foreign correspond- 
ents. 

KSEK — Pittsburg, Kansas 
K.VMA — Magnolia, Ark. 
WHBI — Newark, N. J. 

These enterprising stations will begin 
broadcasting exclusive air-expressed 
tape reports and interviews from the 
news-capitols of the world by their own 
foreign correspondents Sept. 1. All 
broadcasts are personalized with station 
call letters and sponsor ID's . . . for 
full information and audition tape, pro- 
duced especially for your station, write. 

Laurence News Features, Inc. 
Washington Bureau 
Burlington Hotel 
Washington, D. C. 



INSTRUCTION 



FCC l»t PHONE LICENSES 
IN 5 TO 6 WEEKS 

WILLIAM B. OGDEN — 10th Year 
1150 W. Olive Ave. 
Burbank, Calif. 

Reservations Necessary All ("lasses - 
Over 1700 Successful Students 



Page 108 • July 2, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



covering increase in power and to operate trans, 
by remote control from 2nd and Atlantic Sts. 

KEOK Fort Dodge, Iowa — Granted license for 
am station. 



Actions of June 21 

WNES-FM Central City, Ky.— Granted license 
for fm station. 

KSD-TV St. Louis, Mo. — Granted cp to change 
trans, location and make ant. and other minor 
equipment changes. 

WBSE-FM Hillsdale, Mich.— Granted mod. of 
cp to change ERP from 1 kw to 740 w. 

Following were granted extensions of comple- 
tion dates as shown: KLIX-TV Twin Falls, Idaho, 
to 1-15-57; WWLP (TV) Springfield, Mass., to 10- 
1-56; KILT El Paso, Tex., to 1-1-57. 

Actions of June 20 

WMCD Welch, W. Va. — Granted license cover- 
ing increase in power. 

Actions of June 19 

WNES Central City, Ky. — Granted license cov- 
ering erection of new am tower and side mount 
proposed fm ant. near top. 

WJHP-TV Jacksonville, Fla.— Granted license 
for tv station and to specify trans, location as 
4038 Phillips Hwy., near Jacksonville. 

WBEN-TV Buffalo, N. Y.— Granted license cov- 
ering changes in facilities. 

Following were granted extensions of comple- 
tion dates as shown: WKNB-TV New Britain, 
Conn., to 1-15-57; WBLU Salem, Va., to 9-1-56; 
WPRT Prestonsburg, Ky., to 9-20-56; KOEL Oel- 
wein, Iowa, to 8-31-56; WGRF Aguadilla, P. R., 
to 9-12-56. 

Actions of June 18 

KTTS-FM Springfield, Mo.— Granted license 
for changes in licensed station. 

WABT Birmingham, Ala. — Granted license cov- 
ering changes in facilities of existing station. 

WFMY-TV Greensboro, N. C— Granted license 
to cover cp which authorized changes in facili- 
ties of existing tv and to specify description of 
studio and trans, location as Phillips Ave. at 
White (not a move). 

WVEC-TV Hampton, Va.— Granted extension of 
completion date to 1-4-57. 

June 26 Applications 

Accepted for Filing 
License to Cover Cp 

KCCT-FM Corpus Christi, Tex.— Seeks license 
to cover cp which authorized changes in licensed 
station. 

Modification of Cp 

KVAN-TV Vancouver, Wash.— Seeks mod. of 
cp for extension of completion date. 

WLTV (TV) Wheeling, W. Va.— Seeks mod. of 
cp for extension of completion date. 

Renewal of Licenses 
KSTB Breckenridge, Tex.; KEEN Carrizo 
Springs, Tex.; KERC Eastland, Tex. WVSH (FM) 
Huntington, Ind. 

Remote Control 
WGBB Freeport, N. Y.; WQXF Oxford, N. C. 



June 27 Decisions 

ACTIONS ON MOTIONS 
By Commissioner John C. Doerfcr 

WLOX Biloxi, Miss.— Granted petition for ex- 
tension of time to and including August 1 to file 
exceptions to initial decision in ch. 13 pro- 
ceeding, Biloxi. Action June 26. 

Broadcast Bureau — Granted petition for exten- 
sion of time to and including June 29 to file com- 
ments to petition to enlarge issues filed by Hunt- 
ington-Montauk Bcstg. Co., Deer Park, L. I., 
N. Y., in am proceeding re its application. Action 
June 26. 



By Chief Hearing Examiner 
James D. Cunningham 

WPGA West Point, Ga.— Ordered that hearing 
will be held Sept. 10 re application for mod. of 
cp. Action June 21. 

Florida West Coast Broadcasters Inc., St. Pe- 
tersburg, Fla. — Granted petition for intervention 
in proceeding re am applications of Polly B. 
Hughes, Tampa, Fla., and Holiday Isles Bcstg. 
Co., St. Petersburg Beach, Fla.; petitioner is 
made party to proceeding in capacity of inter- 
vener. Action June 21. 

Willimantic, Conn.— On chief hearing exam- 
iner's own motion, ordered that oral argument on 
petition of Robert A. Mensel, Willimantic, to 
accept appearance filed late in proceeding re its 
am application, et al., will be held on June 25, 
at 9:30 a.m. Action June 22. 

KTBB Tyler, Tex.— Granted motion for post- 
ponement from June 25 to July 2 when exhibits 
shall be exchanged among parties in proceeding 
re its am application. 

WCOC-TV Pachuta, Miss. — By memorandum 
opinion and order denied June 18 "Petition For 
Leave To File Supplement To Opposition To Pe- 
tition To Enlarge The Issues" in ch. 7 proceeding 
Pachuta-Laurel. Action June 25. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



By Hearing Examiners 
James D. Cunningham and Herbert Sharfman 
WKNB-TV New Britain, Conn.— Upon oral re- 
quest of WHNC-TV New Haven, Conn., and with 
consent of other parties in proceeding re applica- 
tions for mod. of cp of station WKNB-TV and for 
transfer of control from Julian Gross, et al., to 
NBC, continued prehearing conference, sched- 
uled for June 22 indefinitely and to date to be 
fixed by subsequent order. Action June 21. 

By Hearing Examiner Herbert Sharfman 
WEXL Royal Oak, Mich.— Upon oral request of 
counsel for station WEXL and with consent of 
counsel for applicants Paul A. Brandt, West 
Branch, Mich, and Livingston Bcstg. Co., Howell, 
Mich., ordered that prehearing conference sched- 
uled for July 6 is continued to July 18 at 2 :00 p.m. 
Action June 26. 

KAKJ (TV) Reno, Nev.— On hearing exam- 
iner's own motion, ordered that hearing date in 
the matter of revocation of television cp of 
KAKJ (TV) is continued from July 13 to July 
23. Action June 26. 

By Hearing Examiner Basil P. Cooper 
News On The Air Inc., Port Clinton, Ohio — 

Granted June 20 pleading requesting that date 
presently specified for exchange of certain ex- 
hibits be changed from June 21 to July 30, and 
date for further prehearing conference is changed 



from July 9 to Sept. 20. Action June 21. 

Fresno, Calif.— Pursuant to agreement reached 
at June 6 evidentiary hearing, ordered that re- 
vised Exhibit 1 and affidavit clarifying certain 
testimony submitted on behalf of applicant, B. L. 
Golden, Fresno, are received in evidence and 
record is closed. Action June 22. 

By Hearing Examiner Hugh B. Hutchison 

Entiat, Wash— Granted motion filed June 18 by 
counsel for Commission for extension of time 
to and including June 21 to file proposed findings 
of fact and conclusions in matter of cease and 
desist order to be directed against EAO-TV Co., 
Entiat. Action June 21. 

By Hearing Examiners 
Hugh B. Hutchison and Jay A. Kyle 
Niles, Mich. — Pursuant to prehearing confer- 
ence held June 13 with counsel in proceeding re 
am applications of Voice of Berrien County, Niles, 
and Lake Broadcasters, St. Joseph, Mich., ordered 
that exchange of exhibits will be accomplished 
not later than Sept. 5, and that hearing is con- 
tinued from July 16 to Sept. 10. Action June 22. 

By Hearing Examiner H. Gifford Irion 
KP7A Yuma, Ariz. — Denied petition for indefi- 
nite continuance of hearing scheduled to com- 
mence on June 25 in ch. 13 proceeding, Yuma. 



UPCOMING 



JULY 

July 10: TvB overall advertiser-agency tv pres- 
entation, Coconut Grove, Hollywood. 

July 12: TvB presentation, Gold Room, Fair- 
mont Hotel, San Francisco. 

AUGUST 

Aug. 17-19: West Virginia Broadcasters' Assn., 
late summer meeting, Greenbrier Hotel, White 
Sulphur Springs, W. Va. 

SEPTEMBER 

Sept. 11-12: CBS Radio convention. Hotel Pierre, 
New York. 

OCTOBER 

Oct. 1-3: National Electronics Conference & Ex- 
hibition, Hotel Sherman, Chicago. 

Oct. 4-5: Central Region AAAA Meeting, Hotel 
Blackstone, Chicago. 

Oct. 7-10: Western Region AAAA Meeting, Hotel 
Del Coronado, Coronado, Calif. 

Oct. 29-30: Second annual RAB Nat'l. Radio Ad- 
vertising Conference, Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, 
New York. 



NOVEMBER 

Nov. 27-28: AAAA Eastern Annual Conference, 
Hotel Roosevelt, New York. 



NARTB CONFERENCES 



Region 5 (Minn., N. D., 

East S. D., Iowa, 

Neb., Mo.) 
Region 7 (Mountain 

States ) 
Region 8 (Wash., Ore., 

Calif., Nev., Ariz., 

T. H, Alaska) 
Region 6 (Kan., Okla., 

Tex. ) 

Region 2 (Pa., Del., 
Md.. W. Va., D. C, 
Va., N. C., S. C.) 

Region 1 (New Eng- 
land) 

Region 4 (Ky., Ohio, 
Ind., Mich., 111., Wis.) 

Region 3 (Fla., Ga., 
Ala., Miss., La., Ark., 
Tenn.. P. R.) 



Sept. Nicollet Hotel 

17- 18 Minneapolis 

Sept. Utah Hotel 

20-21 Salt Lake City 

Sept. St. Francis Hotel 

24- 25 San Francisco 

Sept. Okla. Biltmore 

27-28 Okla. City 

Oct. Shoreham Hotel 

11-12 Washington 

Oct. Somerset Hotel 

15-16 Boston 

Oct. Sheraton Lincoln 

18- 19 Indianapolis 
Oct. Dinkler- 

25- 26 Tutwiler 

Birmingham 



BROADCASTING 

I Ff 



THE NEWSWEEKLY OF RADIO AND TELEVISION 



TELECASTING 1735 De Sa ^ es ^ treet * ^- Washington 6. D. C. 
PLEASE START MY SUBSCRIPTION WITH THE NEXT ISSUE. 



□ 52 weekly issues of BROADCASTING • TELECASTING $7.00 

□ 52 weekly issues and BROADCASTING Yearbook-Marketbook 9.00 

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Please send to home address 



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AIR MAIL SERVICE AVAILABLE ON ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS AT POST- 
AGE COST. WEST COAST SUBSCRIBERS ADD $41.60 TO ANNUAL 
SUBSCRIPTION RATE. COST TO OTHER LOCALITIES ON REQUEST. 



July 2, 1956 



Page 109 



editorials 



Is It A Crime To Be Honest? 




EN Philadephia radio stations are under federal indictment 
for agreeing to adhere to sound business practices. 



If that sounds screwy, don't blame us. Blame the Sherman Anti- 
trust Act. 

The stations, all members of the Philadelphia Radio and Televi- 
sion Broadcasters Assn.. were indicted for allegedly agreeing not 
to deviate from their published rate cards. 

The government cannot object, of course, to any station's unilat- 
eral decision to stick by its published prices. But a joint agreement 
among several stations to do so is a violation of the law — even 
though stations individually set their own rates. Or at least that is 
the contention of the U. S. attorney general. 

In Philadelphia we have a good example of how well-meaning 
businessmen can be ambushed by legal technicalities while en route 
to a perfectly lawful objective. 

Like good radio broadcasters everywhere, the Philadelphians were 
trying to sell advertising as though it were a desirable commodity, 
not distress merchandise to be unloaded at panic prices. The mistake 
of the Philadelphia stations — if indeed they made one — was to 
present a united front in defense of their rate cards. 

It is altogether probable that some advertisers may seek to use the 
Philadelphia indictment as an argument against the maintenance of 
rates. If so, we fervently hope that broadcasters will not be misled. 

The grand jury's indictment in no way pertains to the practice of 
dealing openly and honestly and at card rates. It was aimed solely 
at the alleged agreement among several broadcasters. 

The "Seventh" Report & Order 

THE least that can be said for the FCC's tv allocations "report 
and order" of last week is that the Commission did the best it 
could with what it thought it had. The most: that it is a first, if 
somewhat hesitant, step in attempting to meet the critically danger- 
ous "economy of scarcity" issue in television allocations. 

What the FCC majority has done will be damned or praised, 
depending upon how applicants and competitors are affected. Those 
are normal reflexes. Anyone adversely affected will regard the FCC's 
action as cruel and inhuman. The FCC, however, will argue that 
it must look at the public and what will do the greatest good for the 
greatest number. 

The FCC has Congress breathing down its neck. No action could 
have produced an effort by Congress itself to try its inexpert hand 
at allocating. That much may have been averted. 

There are many aspects of the FCC's overall action that appear 
strange indeed. For example, the open invitation to other non- 
broadcast services to come in and bid for vhf spectrum space. And 
the proposed assignment of two vhf's to non-commercial educa- 
tional where they will do the least good for the smallest number, 
if they're ever used at all. Or the incongruity of pulling a couple of 
vhf assignments out of the table of allocations with no apparent 
places to go. 

But what the majority did was the minimum step it felt it could 
take in applying "uniform criteria" to all areas. It seems to have 
missed here too. It should be remembered, however, that nothing 
yet is final; that this is proposed rule-making. Those "comments" 
the FCC requests will practically inundate its staff, we predict. 

The long-range project looking toward a Utopian all-uhf tv 
world, is wishful at this writing. It probably won't be acted upon 
by any member of this Commission. It is years away. In the interim 
it is to be hoped that scientific genius will come up with develop- 
ments that will make this all-uhf program feasible. 

There's the other side of the coin. The short range "interim" 
action, which could bring 13 cases of deintermixture, has to com- 
mend it the recognition that separations and standards will be 
maintained, avoiding indiscriminate drop-ins that could demoralize 
existing service. Of equal significance is the recognition that there 
must be uhf if the scarcity enigma and all the evils it portends are 
to be dispelled. That should trump the hands of those who espouse 
public-utility rate regulation, including Sen. John W. Bricker (R- 
Ohio). 

We question whether all or even most of the proposed changes in 
Page 110 • July 2, 1956 




Drawn for BROADCASTING • TELECASTING by Sid Hlx 

"Who would think an antenna would take so much servicing!" 



this initial batch of deintermixtures will occur. All parties will get 
their day in court. Nearly all the cases came by split votes. A swing 
of a vote might be sufficient to change the picture. And a new com- 
missioner (T. A. M. Craven who succeeds E. M. Webster) will be 
in on them. 

Last week's action was an about-face for the majority which acted 
last Nov. 10 for "one-shot" rule-making, now superseded. Comrs. 
Hyde and Bartley held out then, but for somewhat different 
reasons. A couple of weeks ago the sentiment was for wholesale 
drop-ins, with uhf all but abandoned. The new action, whatever the 
evident short-comings, rejects down-grading and recognizes uhf 
in tv's future. This is a combination of the original thinking of 
Mr. Hyde combined with the crash program for uhf espoused by 
Chairman McConnaughey. 

The FCC majority tried to look at the whole broad picture. Some 
people are hurt; others helped. These are penalties of all risk busi- 
nesses, and broadcasting is peculiarly sensitive because the most 
precious asset — the license — is subject to omissions and commis- 
sions of government. 



Two Communicators 

THE "engineering guard" on the FCC changes this week. Comr. 
E. M. Webster ends his distinguished nine-year tenure as a 
member of that agency. He turns over mythical command as watch- 
dog of the megacycles and the kilowatts to his old friend and 
colleague, T. A. M. Craven, who moves in where he left off 12 years 
ago. 

Comr. Webster retires from the FCC at 67, but it's our guess 
he won't retire as an active, vibrant personality in communications. 
He tried to retire several times from the Coast Guard but was called 
back to active duty, winding up as a commodore, whereupon he 
promptly became a private communicator, and then accepted a call 
back to the FCC. 

Comr. Craven, at 63, is young for his years. He served his 
country as a naval officer, and has been in on allocations since his 
junior lieutenant days in the 20's. He will fit in admirably on those 
specialized assignments handled by his predecessor. 

Comr. Webster is an expert in international communications. He 
is highly respected by foreign communications administrations. He 
is a diplomat-engineer. In his "quasi-retirement" we are certain he 
will have opportunities to serve his government again and again on 
special missions in the sensitive and important field of international 
communications. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 





Channel 11 • NBC in Maryland 



in a red-hot sports town 

SPORTS PAGE 



'grand-slammer" in sales! 



Here's the fellow who's earned the confidence of the Baltimore sports fan. He's Joe Croghan, our Radio 
and TV Sports Editor. Joe's "SPORTS PAGE" has a tremendous following of avid sports fans, eager for 
the early evening run-down . . . with facts, unbiased commenting, and interviews with sports personalities. 
It's the third leg of our powerful News-Weather-Sports presentation at 6:45 p.m. with news and sports 
sponsored respectively by American Beer and Shell Oil Co. 

"SPORTS PAGE" is now available for sponsorship — Monday thru Friday 
6:50 to 7:00 p.m. — and it's a terrific opportunity! 




WE'LL TALK TO YOU IN TERMS OF 






Nationally Represented by Edward Petry Co. 




o more 




rating 
point! 



The dominant station serving 

Petersburg and Central Virginia 



mond, 



Number of TV homes 
in Grade B area 



TV homes per rating point 
projected to Grade B area 



WXEX-TV | 


205,000 


2,050 


STATION B 




HI 




STATION C | 


i ^^^^^ 


1 



• WXEX-TV delivers 16.9% more TV homes than Station B— 17.3% more than Station C. 

• WXEX-TV gives you a bonus of better than 2 TV homes with every 12 homes you buy. 

• Station B is now operating on interim low power and tower. On this basis, the Grade B area of 
WXEX-TV delivers 58.3 more TV homes than does Station B. 

Service contours of stations considered are for maximum power and tower calculated 
by Kear & Kennedy (consulting radio engineers, Washington, D. C.) from information 
on file with FCC, and based on latest available ARF figures updated to June 1, 1956. 



. NBC BASIC— CHANNEL 8 w . 

Tom Tinsley, President Irvin G. Abeloff, Vice Pres. 

National Representatives: Select Station Representatives in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington. 

Forjoe & Co. in Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas, Atlanta. 



35c PER COP' 





IDEX 



re 70 



N THIS ISSUE: 



Radio Spot Billings 
Well Above 1955 

Page 31 



two Years to Color 
or Agencies — C&W 
Page 32 



Tv Best for Autos, 
Ivertest Study Shows 
Page 39 



Broadcasters Doubt 
CC Plan Workable 

Page 52 



!C Pays $16,000,000 
: or Baseball Rights 
Page 79 




year 




o more 




rating 
point! 



The dominant station serving Richmond, 

Petersburg and Central Virginia 





Number of TV homes 
in Grade B area 


TV homes per rating point 
projected to Grade B area 


WXEX-TV 


205,000 | 


2,050 


STATION B 


1 75,400 


■ m 


STATION C 


1 74,800 


1,748 | 



• WXEX-TV delivers 16.9% more TV homes than Station B— 17.3% more than Station C. 

• WXEX-TV gives you a bonus of better than 2 TV homes with every 12 homes you buy. 

• Station B is now operating on interim low power and tower. On this basis, the Grade B area of 
WXEX-TV delivers 58.3 more TV homes than does Station B. 

i 

Service contours of stations considered are for maximum power and tower calculated 
by /Kear & Kennedy (consulting radio engineers, Washington, D. C.) from information 
on 'file with FCC, and based on latest available ARF figures updated to June 1, 1956. 




Tom Tinsley, President 



NBC BASIC— CHANNEL 8 



Irvin G. Abeloff, Vice Pres. 



DIO AND TELEVISION 



National Representatives: Select Station Representatives in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington. 

Forjoe & Co. in Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas, Atlanta. 




Thousands of square miles — 190 counties in 5 states — IVa million 
people — 660,950 families with radios, 98% penetration — and 

most of those radios, most of the time, are tuned to 

WNAX-570 

the most effective and economical media buy to cover all of rich Big Aggie Land* where 
TV means 'Taint Visible — one of the more important markets in the U. S.; ranks 6th in 

effective buying power. Call your Katz man. 

(All right, so we can't spell. But a lot of people with a lot of money 
to spend sure listen to our radio station — and buy accordingly.) 













1 llffllXHRfc \ ** 1 N N 1 * ° ' 










WNAX-570 • YANKTON, SOUTH DAKOTA 










* BIG AGGIE LAND 


CBS Radio. A Cowles Station. Under the same management as KVTV, 
Channel 9, Sioux City, Iowa. Don D. Sullivan, Advertising Director. 




Published every Monday, with Yearbook Numbers (53rd and 54th issues) published in January and July by Broadcasting Publications, Inc 1735 
DeSales St., N.W., Washington 6, D. C. Entered as second class matter March 14, 1933, at Post Office at Washington, D. C, under act of March 3, 1879. 



LANCASTER, PENNA. 



Among the television markets foremost in 
the manufacture of food and kindred 
products, the Channel 8 Multi-City Market 
ranks sixteenth, based on production 
figures for America's top 100 counties 
(SALES MANAGEMENT ' 'Survey of Buying Power" 
—May 10, 1956) Food manufacturing is just 
one of the many widely diversified indus- 
tries which make the WGAL-TV Channel 
8 market of first importance in your adver- 
tising planning. 

STEINMAN STATION 

Clair McCol lough, Pres. 

Representative 

the MEEKER company, inc. 

New York Los Angeles 

Chicago San Francisco 



BC AND CBS 



CHANNEL 8 MULTI-CITY MARKET 




316,000 WATTS 



July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



closed circuit: 



SCHISM • Look for announcement this 
week that Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. 
radio stations will cut away from NBC — 
at least to extent of independent operation 
during daytime. WBC stations expected to 
make move are WBZ Boston, KYW Cleve- 
land, WOWO Fort Wayne and pioneer 
NBC affiliate— KDKA Pittsburgh. WBC 
for some time has been critical of NBC 
Radio operations. 

B«T 

FULL PLANS for NBC Radio's successor 
program to substitute for Monday-Friday 
Weekday service which goes off air July 27 
[At Deadline, July 2] are expected to be 
revealed this week. In addition to already- 
known plan to program Bandstand (to fea- 
ture name bands and to start July 30) for 
two hours in morning, NBC understood to 
be aiming dramas, daytime serials and mu- 
sic for afternoon two-hour segment now 
occupied by Weekday. Afternoon portion, 
like morning Bandstand probably will be 
sold on same basis as Weekday: one-min- 
ute, 30-second, and six-second participa- 
tions with compensation to stations also on 
Weekday basis. 

B»T 

INTROSPECTION • Crosley Broadcasting 
Corp., subsidiary of Avco, is getting organ- 
izational once-over from Paul Mulligan & 
Assoc., New York, management consul- 
tants, as part of over-all Avco appraisal or- 
dered by Chairman-President Victor Em- 
manuel. Firm has been in Cincinnati about 
fortnight, and has just completed appraisal 
of appliance and electronic divisions. 

B»T 

BBDO, New York and its client, General 
Mills, Minneapolis, are huddling with all 
three tv networks for half-hour evening 
time, for start in fall. General Mills is ex- 
pected to buy new Louis G. Cowan Produc- 
tions quiz show package, One Giant Step. 

B«T 

STILL LOOKING • Whether anything 
comes of it or not, Senate Permanent Inves- 
tigating Committee is pursuing its study of 
purported influence in tv cases by Murray 
Chotiner, former campaign manager for 
Vice President Nixon. While only one case 
— involving ch. 12 in Fresno — so far has 
been mentioned, it's whispered that others 
also are being scrutinized. As for Fresno 
(grant went to KFRE over KARM but 
FCC has proposed deintermixture of mar- 
ket), committee counsel still are conducting 
inquiry, subpoenaing new records in effort 
to ferret out further information. 

B»T 

SUBSCRIPTION TELEVISION interests 
aren't happy about NBC's purchase of five- 
year rights to World Series and All-Star 
baseball games (see story, page 79). That 
deal and NBC's solid arrangement for 
broadcasts of Rose Bowl football games 
deprive toll tv advocates of top sports 
events on which they were counting as 
major box-office attractions if and when 
subscription tv were authorized. 



PLOT THICKENS • Philadelphia federal 
grand jury has added executives of RKO 
Teleradio Pictures Inc. to list of witnesses 
in its investigation of NBC-Westinghouse 
station exchanges [B«T, July 2, June 25]. 
Jury subpoenaed RKO Teleradio for infor- 
mation regarding reported conversations 
with NBC to acquire Teleradio's WNAC- 
TV Boston. 

B»T 

MEANWHILE NBC-RCA executives were 
said to be under order to appear before 
same grand jury this week. Those on list 
were said to be Brig. Gen. David Sarnoff, 
RCA chairman; Robert W. Sarnoff, NBC 
president; Joseph Heffernan and Charles R. 
Denny, NBC vice presidents. 

B«T 

ACTORS IN OWNERSHIP • Transcon- 
tinent Television Corp., which recently ac- 
quired WSVA-AM-TV Harrisonburg, Va., 
and awaits FCC approval of its application 
for WHAM-AM-TV Rochester, N. Y., 
from General Dynamics Corp. for $5 mil- 
lion, is about to acquire show business 
glamour in its corporate structure. Robert 
Montgomery, who doubles as President Ei- 
senhower's tv coach; Franchot Tone, whose 
father is senior vice president of Carborun- 
dum Co. of Niagara Falls, and Ray Bolger, 
Hollywood-Broadway personality, are in 
process of becoming minority investors in 
Transcontincnt, which plans to expand its 
tv holdings. President and operating head 
of Transcontincnt is David C. Moore, (for 
ownership, see B«T, April 2). 

B»T 

TOTAL of 300,000, or 10-fold number of 
color tv sets that existed last Jan. 1. now 
being projected by NBC's planning and 
research department for next Jan. 1 . NBC's 
figures, which are circulated to advertisers 
and agencies, also forecast one million sets 
by Jan. 1, 1958, 12.5 million by 1961. 

B»T 

DEED IS DONE • Formal contract was 
signed in New York Friday whereby Crow- 
ell-Collier Pub. Co. acquires KFWB Holly- 
wood from Harry Maizlish for stock, cash 
and notes amounting to about $2,350,000, 
highest price on record for regional outlet. 
Paul Smith signed as president of newly 
formed KFWB Broadcasting Corp., with 
Mr. Maizlish to become vice president of 
Crowell-Collier upon FCC approval of 
transaction, for which application will be 
filed this week. (See story, page 58.) 

B»T 

ABC is in quandry regarding political con- 
vention coverage in some top U. S. mar- 
kets, among them Pittsburgh, St. Louis, 
Boston. Limited vhf stations in those cities 
owe primary allegiance to CBS and NBC. 
ABC had plan to get its coverage into these 
markets by tie-in with educational vhf out- 
lets, but when non-commercial ch. 13 
KETA (TV) Oklahoma City withdrew its 
petition, FCC unanimously refused to "en- 



tertain" ABC-only request to waive rules 
permitting educational outlets to carry full 
ABC coverage, commercials and all. Situa- 
tion is now at impasse as ABC seeks an- 
other educational station to participate in 
its petition to FCC. 

B«T 

BROADCASTERS AT BAT • Insiders are 
betting that new ownership of Detroit 
Tigers will be broadcast-connected, what 
with three of eight bids having radio-tv as- 
pects. Among bidders are syndicates which 
include George B. Storer, president of 
Storer Broadcasting Co.; John E. Fetzer of 
Fetzer Broadcasting Co. and Fred Knorr, 
WKMH Dearborn, with associates; and 
Harold F. Gross, WJIM-AM-TV Lansing 
and associates (see story, page 70). 

B»T 

HOT POTATO coming up before FCC 
this week involves many uhf grantees who 
haven't yet begun to build. Commission 
at beginning of year threatened to make uhf 
grantees applying for extensions show some 
signs of building; this was postponed last 
January to July 16. Big question now is 
should Commission be lenient about ex- 
tensions, since uhf future is still uncertain, 
or should it begin to crack down on grounds 
future of uhf is assured by Commission's 
allocations report two weeks ago. One 
clement in favor of crackdown, according 
to some staff sources, is that deletion of few 
uhf grants here and there might permit 
uhf channel switches to be made without 
show cause and other legal motions. 

B«T 

GIVING IT AWAY • Radio-tv women's 
commentators seem to be fair game for free 
product plug pitches in beauty preparation 
field. Another example comes to light in- 
volving Noreen Inc.. Denver manufacturer 
of color hair rinses and other products. No- 
reen has followed lead of Helene Curtis 
Industries in soliciting commentators for 
free product mentions in guise of news 
[B»T, June 18] sending scripts to over 
110 radio-tv stations in medium and large 
size markets. Acceptance is described as 
good, with three stations showing interest 
for every two not returning cards. Neither 
Noreen nor Beauty Products Ltd., distribu- 
tor organization, both headed by Harry L. 
Baum Jr., is using paid broadcast time. 
Agency is Bradley Lane Adv., Denver. 

B»T 

MANEUVERING and marketing strategy 
were involved in recent purchase by Pabst 
Brewing Co. of It's Polka Time, starting on 
ABC-TV Friday. Pabst originally wanted 
to take WBKB (TV} Chicago show in only 
two or three markets but finally agreed to 
buy it on 19 ABC-TV (northeastern leg) 
stations on seven months' test basis. If it 
proves successful, Pabst is represented as 
willing to pick up property for 52 weeks 
under three-year pact. In discussions, which 
involved Leo Burnett Co., Pabst agency, 
was ABC President Robert E. Kintner. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 5 





March-April, 1956 
Metro Pulse: WHB 1st 
360 out of 360 

!/4 hours in and out of home, 
Mon.-Fri. 6 a.m.-midnight 

WL± March, 1956 

% Area Nielsen: 

11 WHB 1st 

I every time period, 

1st all day and night 
42% share of audience 
Mon.-Sat. 6 a.m.-midnight 



Latest available 
Area Pulse: WHB 1st 
263 out of 288 

hrs. . . . with 25-2nd place 
l /g hrs., Mon.-Sat., 6 a.m.-6 p.m. 



Feb.-May, 1956 

K. C. Hooper: WHB 1st 

248 out of 260 V* hrs. 

1st all day with 
43.5% share of audience 
Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. 
Sat. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. 



Dominate? And how! Listen to the way 
Kansas City looks the way Blair tells it — 
or talk to WHB General Manager George 
W. Armstrong. 



WHB 



10,000 watts-710 kc 
Kansas City 

* Transfer subject to FCC approval. 



CONTINENT BROADCASTING COMPANY 

"The Storz Stations" — Todd Storz, President 



WDGY, Minneapolis-St. Paul 
Represented by 
Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



KOWH, Omaha 
Represented by 
H-R Reps, Inc. 



WHB, Kansas City WTIX, New Orleans WQAM,* Miami 
Represented by Represented by Represented by 

John Blair & Co. Adam J. Young, Jr. John Blair & Co. 



at deadline 



ATTACKS ON VHF GRANTS RENEWED 
FOLLOWING FCC'S ALLOCATIONS REPORT 



IN WAKE of FCC's allocations report, three 
requests were filed in U. S. Court of Appeals 
in Washington to rehear arguments in deinter- 
mixture cases involving Madison, Wis.; Evans- 
vills, Ind., and Albany, N. Y. 

At same time Friday, Commission issued 
final decisions changing allocations in Nash- 
quitsa (Martha's Vineyard), Mass.; Pueblo- 
Alamosa, Colo.; Clarksdale-Greenwood, Miss.; 
Calumet-Marquette, Mich., and Clarkston. 
Wash.; issued proposals to change assignments 
in Youngstown-Pittsburgh-New Castle, Pa.; 
Woodward-Elk City, Okla., and Anderson-In- 
dianapolis, Ind.; and denied petitions seeking 
changes in Roswell-Artesia, N. M., and Houma, 
La. 

Court pleadings were filed by ch. 27 WKOW- 
TV Madison seeking rehearing on its appeal 
against FCC ch. 3 grant to WISC-TV there; by 
ch. 62 WFIE (TV) Evansville asking to be re- 
heard in its appeal against FCC ch. 7 grant to 
WTVW (TV) there, and by ch. 35 WTRI (TV) 
Albany, N. Y., asking further argument in its 
appeal against allocation of ch. 10 to Vail 
Mills, N. Y. FCC was upheld in its right to 
issue vhf grants in court's decision last month 
[B»T, June 11]. 

Essence of pleadings in Madison and Evans- 
ville cases is that FCC has "effected a dramatic 
about-face." Originally Commission said de- 
intermixture was nationwide problem; two 
weeks ago it proposed 13 individual deinter- 
mixtures including Madison and Evansville. It 
also has issued vhf grants in Peoria and Spring- 
field, 111., but forbade construction pending out- 
come of deintermixture proposals in those 
cities. Thus, say Madison and Evansville uhf 
stations, FCC should withdraw grants in those 
cities, or at least modify them so stations can't 
begin operating. They asked court to reverse 
last month's ruling and remand case to FCC. 



RKO Pathe Integrates 
East, West Studio Units 

INTEGRATION of production facilities of RKO 
Pathe studios on East and West Coasts for 
making of motion pictures for tv by RKO Pathe- 
Tv, division of RKO Radio Pictures, is being 
announced today (Mon.) by Fred Ahern, super- 
visor of tv operations, after two weeks of con- 
ferences at RKO's home office in New York. 
Details were worked out by Daniel T. O'Shea, 
RKO's president; Jay Bonafield, head of RKO- 
TV in East; Mr. Ahern, and Douglas Travers, 
production executive. 

In new setup, production staff at New York 
will have access to optical and camera effects 
of west coast studio, along with personnel and 
technical facilities of art and hairstyling depart- 
ments and 10 fully-equipped sound stages. Mr. 
Ahern said RKO Pathe-Tv will produce tv 
series, single programs of varying lengths and 
commercials ranging from spot announcements 
to "extended advertisements." (Both studios also 
are engaged in commercial and industrial 
movies). Facilities at RKO Pathe-Tv in East 
will be made available to outside tv film pro- 
ducers when not being used by RKO, similar to 
arrangement now in effect on West Coast. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



WKOW-TV also officially protested to FCC 
June 20 grant of special temporary authority 
for commercial operation to WISC-TV in 
Madison; asked also that Commission suspend 
ST A or move WISC-TV to ch. 21 or other 
uhf channel pending outcome of deintermixture 
petition. WISC-TV now operating on regular 
schedule. WTVW in Evansville is scheduled 
to begin commercial operation in September. 

WTRI Albany asked court for further argu- 
ment in order to acquaint it with new aspects 
of Vail Mills, N. Y., ch. 10 drop-in. FCC has 
proposed to delete ch. 10 from Vail Mills. De- 
cision still awaited from court. 

Final decisions changing table of allocations 
were made in following (see story, page 52): 

• Ch. 6 to Nashquitsa (Martha's Vineyard). 
Mass. 

• Ch. 3 moved from Pueblo to Alamosa, 
Colo. 

• Ch. 6 moved from Clarksdale to Green- 
wood, Miss. 

• Ch. 13 moved from Calumet to Marquette. 
Mich. 

• Chs. 34 and 40 allocated to Clarkston, 
Wash. 

Proposals included following, with comments 
due Aug. 3 I : 

• Ch. 33 in lieu of ch. 73 in Youngstown; 
ch. 22 in lieu of ch. 47 in Pittsburgh, and/or 
ch. 45 from New Castle, Pa., to Youngstown, 
Ohio. 

• Ch. 8 moved from Woodward to Elk City, 
Okla.; ch. 35 to replace ch. 8 in Woodward. 

• Ch. 26 in lieu of ch. 61 in Anderson. Ind.; 
ch. 77 for ch. 26 in Indianapolis. 

Requests to move ch. 10 from Roswell to 
Artesia, N. M., denied as was petition to assign 
ch. 1 1 to Houma, La. In latter case, FCC said, 
petitioners can file comments in New Orleans 
deintermixture case. 



More Changes at KNX-CPRN 

GORDON MASON, program promotion mana- 
ger for KNX Los Angeles and Columbia Pacific 
Radio Network, named national sales repre- 
sentative in KNX-CPRN sales department, 
succeeding William Weller. promoted to account 
executive earlier in week (story, page 80). 
Robert M. Fairbanks, formerly sales promotion 
assistant at KNX-CPRN, succeeds Mr. Mason 
with new title of merchandising manager. 



FIRST PLUNGE 

CLOROX CHEMICAL Co. (Clorox), 
Oakland, Calif., planning to use televi- 
sion for first time with estimated $2 mil- 
lion budget allocated for campaign start- 
ing July 22 in over 38 markets. Its agen- 
cy, Honig & Cooper Co., San Francisco, 
is planning to clear station list beginning 
this week. Television Bureau of Adver- 
tising has been known to have worked 
closely with agency and advertiser for 
past year. 



• BUSINESS BRIEFLY 

TEST FOR TULIPS • Associated Bulb Grow- 
ers of Holland, N. Y., said to be considering 
radio for first time this fall, through Ander- 
son & Cairns, N. Y. Importer of Dutch tulip 
bulbs plans to launch three-week spot radio test 
campaign at height of planting season in four 
to five as yet undetermined markets. 

PAID PLUGS • Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
("Somebody Up There Likes Me" film), N. Y., 
launching heavy radio-tv spot campaign in all 
major metropolitan markets, July 16 through 
August. Agency: Donahue & Coe, N. Y. 

COLD SEASON • Gold Medal Candy Corp. 
(Cocilana Co.), Brooklyn, N. Y., for new medi- 
cated cough drops (Cocilana Cough Nips) 
through Emil Mogul Co., N. Y., planning to 
utilize radio spot participations on personality 
programs, starting this fall. Initial distribution 
and advertising for product will cover New 
York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts 
and Connecticut. (For other cold remedy busi- 
ness, see page 33.) 

TV FOR ANTENNAS • Foster & Davies, 
Cleveland, will place tv spot campaign for Alli- 
ance Tennarotor (rotating antenna for tv sets), 
starting in August on stations carrying political 
coverage of conventions and election. Fuller 
& Smith & Ross, Cleveland, was incorrectly 
identified as Tennarotor agency in B«T July 2. 

TWO FOR MJ&A • MacManus, John & Ad- 
ams, N. Y.. effective Aug. 1 will receive two 
new accounts — Riggio Tobacco Co.'s Regent 
Size cigarettes, with advertising budget of ap- 
proximately $2 million, and Good Humor Co., 
with estimated budget of nearly $1 million. H. 
L. Hartman Co., N. Y., has been agency for 
Regent and David Mahoney Inc. (absorbed 
by MJ&A) was agency for Good Humor. 

JELL-O IN 80 • General Foods (Jell-O), N. Y., 
planning three-week radio spot drive starting 
Aug. 1 in about 80 markets. Young & Rubicam, 
N. Y., is agency. 

REMINGTON BUYING • Remington Arms 
Co. (guns and ammunition), Bridgeport, Conn., 
reportedly ordering 10-week spot tv cam- 
paign on 50 stations, starting in September 
and using two participations per week on hunt- 
ing, fishing and sports shows. Remington also 
preparing spot radio campaign in Alaska, using 
three announcements per week on six stations 
for 22 weeks, starting end of July. Agency: 
BBDO, N. Y. 

MORE FOR PM • Philip Morris Inc. (ciga- 
rettes), N. Y., which started television spot an- 
nouncement campaign in 50 markets July 1, 
is expanding that schedule in 15 additional 
markets, spending approximately $600,000 for 
Class A 20-second spots. Contract runs for 
52 weeks. TvB has long been proposing ex- 
pansion for Philip Morris, and had compiled 

(Continues on page 9) 
July 9, 1956 • Page 7 



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Page 8 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



PEOPLE 



at deadline 



Sindlinger Reports Again 
On Allen-Sullivan Duel 

STEVE ALLEN improved his competitive po- 
sition against Ed Sullivan substantially in sec- 
ond clash of their Sunday evening tv shows 
July 1, but Sullivan still outdrew him, accord- 
ing to data collected last week by interviewers 
of Sindlinger & Co., who calculated that Sulli- 
van show got 54% of combined audience and 
Allen program 46%, due largely to 10,661,000 
channel-hoppers who spent most of hour with 
Allen but switched to Sullivan for some of 
time. This backed up Sindlinger prediction 
made before broadcast [B«T, July 2]. 

Asked about Trendex rating report, which 
gave edge to Allen with rating of 20.2 to Sul- 
livan's 14.8, Albert E. Sindlinger, president, 
told B»T that his survey covered entire coun- 
try, but that if only major markets were con- 
sidered his finding would be reversed as Allen 
is most popular in larger cities. For yesterday's 
telecasts, Mr. Sindlinger Friday estimated Sul- 
livan would have total of 25,492,000 viewers 
and Allen total of 18,023,000. 

Closed-Circuit Tv System 
To Pre-Test Shows, Spots 

CLOSED-CIRCUIT system for pre-testing tv 
programming and commercials with viewers at 
home will be launched on July 17 when Tele- 
studios Inc., New York, will send its initial pro- 
gram to group of 500 families in Wave Crest 
Gardens, middle income housing development 
in Far Rockaway, Queens, L. I. Participating 
in program will be Kenyon & Eckhardt, Leo 
Burnett and third advertising agency still to be 
determined (also see story page 34). George 
Guild, Telestudio's president, believes his closed 
circuit audience research system is only one to 
pre-test complete family units at home within 
framework of their regular tv viewing habits. 

Stevens Named Partner 
In McKenna & Wilkinson 

APPOINTMENT of David S. Stevens as part- 
ner in McKenna & Wilkinson, Washington, 
D. C, communications law firm, was an- 
nounced Friday by James A. McKenna Jr., 
senior member. Firm name will be unchanged. 

Mr. Stevens joined M&W three years ago 
from FCC where he was chief of New & 
Changed Facilities Branch, Aural Facilities 
Div., Broadcast Bureau. 

KVVG Resumes Operation 

KVVG Tulare, Calif., has resumed normal op- 
eration following unexpected padlocking Tues- 
day afternoon by Treasury agents for delin- 
quent taxes, General Manager Ron Freeman 
told B«T Friday. He said station had planned 
to pay taxes at end of quarter and at no time 
has refused to pay. He noted that Internal 
Revenue official at settlement Thursday (when 
KVVG returned to air) learned Treasury failed 
to credit April payment made by station on 
total $5,500 due. 

KVVG has application before FCC for trans- 
fer of 100% ownership from Joseph J. Justman 
and M. B. Scott Inc., Beverly Hills agency, to 
James Stacy, movie producer [B»T, July 2]. 



TWO TO GO 

ONLY two more FCC meetings sched- 
uled before Commission recesses for 
summer hiatus. Originally last FCC 
meeting before recess was scheduled for 
Aug. 1, with resumption Sept. 5. New 
schedule sets July 18 as last meeting and 
resumption Aug. 29. Majority of Com- 
mission traveling to San Francisco week 
of July 22 to attend annual convention 
of National Assn. of Railroad & Utilities 
Commissioners. These include, it's un- 
derstood, Chairman McConnaughey and 
Comrs. Doerfer, Mack, Bartley and 
Hyde. There will be one commissioner 
on duty to handle routine and emergency 
matters during recess. 



BUSINESS BRIEFLY 

(Continues from page 7) 

special research to show advantages in deliver- 
ing extra homes. N. W. Ayer & Son, N. Y., 
is agency. 

CO-SPONSORS • Toni Div., Chicago, of Gil- 
lette Co., Boston, to co-sponsor Big Story with 
American Cigar & Cigarette Co. (Pall Mall) on 
alternate Fridays, 9-9:30 p.m. EDT, on NBC- 
TV, starting July 13. North Adv., Chicago, is 
Toni's agency; Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & 
Bayles, N. Y., is Pall Mall's. 

DAYTIME TV • Alberto Culver of Hollywood 
(V-05 hairdressing), Calif., has purchased 13 
alternate Tuesday quarter-hours of It Could Be 
You (Mon.-Fri., 12:30-1 p.m. EDT) and Mod- 
ern Romances (Mon.-Fri., 4:45-5 p.m. EDT) 
on NBC-TV, starting Oct. 9. Agency: Geoffrey 
Wade, Chicago. 

DAYTIME RADIO • The Nestle Co. (instant 
coffee), White Plains, N. Y., set to launch day- 
time spot radio campaign shortly in 12 major 
markets, using up to 20 spots per day in some 
markets. Campaign to run 5-7 days per week, 
depending on market. Agency: McCann-Erick- 
son, N. Y. 

UNDERWOOD TO K&E • William Under- 
wood Co. (deviled ham, other canned prod- 
ucts), Watertown, Mass., with $500,000 radio- 
tv budget, originally scheduled to go from 
BBDO, Boston, to Hermon W. Stevens Adv., 
same city, July 31, is expected instead to ap- 
point Kenyon & Eckhardt, Boston. Frank S. 
Christian, vice president at Stevens, to K&E as 
regional manager, succeeding Norman Mc- 
Kenzie, resigned. Ellen Stillman, account execu- 
tive on Underwood at Stevens, also joins K&E. 
Merchants National Bank also will join K&E. 

ON THE MARKET • NBC-TV understood to 
be offering six weeks of co-sponsorship of 
Buddy Hackett Show to advertising agencies in 
attempt to solve problems involving Helene 
Curtis. Although Curtis had been signed as 
co-sponsor with American Cigar & Cigarette 
Co. (Pall Mall), latter objected to one of Curtis' 
products (Stopette, a deodorant). Now Curtis 
wants to get out for budget reasons. 



MARTIN F. BENNETT, director of RCA re- 
gional operations since October 1954, elected 
vice president in charge of merchandising at 
RCA, it was announced Friday by Brig. Gen. 
David Sarnoff, RCA board chairman, following 
meeting of board. Mr. Bennett will be respon- 
sible for distribution and regional offices of 
RCA, advertising and sales promotion, as well 
as economic planning. 

CHARLES F. HUTCHINSON, executive vice 
president, Chambers & Wiswell Inc., Boston, 
has left that agency and is setting up his own 
firm there. It's understood that Mr. Hutchin- 
son's new agency already has "half a dozen" 
accounts, several of which are accompanying 
him. Details expected to be announced shortly. 

APPOINTMENTS of SEYMOUR (HAP) 
EATON, RICHARD A. BALDWIN and 
ROBERT B. BERSBACH as regional sales 
supervisors for NBC-TV Films to be announced 
Monday by Edward A. Montanus, central sales 
manager. Mr. Eaton has been assigned to north 
central area; Mr. Baldwin to south central and 
Mr. Bersbach to Chicago. 

ADDITIONS to staff of Norman, Craig & 
Kummel, N. Y., include: JAMES M. SHTVAS, 
formerly with WABD (TV) New York, as 
agency radio -television producer; THOMAS 
STAFFORD, formerly with Remington Rand, 
to Ronson account group; WILLIAM G. 
BAKER, to marketing department, and L. J. 
McGRADY assigned to Toledo as Willys ac- 
count executive. 

DONALD DAVIS and VICTOR SACK to 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, N. Y., as account execu- 
tive and producer, respectively, in commercial 
production department. 

A. W. FARGO JR., vice president and account 
executive, Charles W. Hoyt Co., N. Y., elected 
chairman. New York council, American Assn. 
of Advertising Agencies, succeeding BRYAN 
HOUSTON, chairman of Bryan Houston Inc.. 
N. Y., who resigned from council following 
election to AAAA board. 

JOHN T. SHANNON, account executive, Ken- 
yon & Eckhardt, Friday appointed vice presi- 
dent and regional manager in agency's new At- 
lanta office. 

GEORGE B. RICHARDSON, account execu- 
tive. Young & Rubicam. San Francisco, elected 
vice president and account supervisor. 

LOUIS L. ERGMANN, radio-tv director since 
1951. Robert W. Orr & Assoc., Friday elected 
vice president in charge of radio-tv. 

THOMAS F. O'NEIL, board chairman of RKO 
Teleradio Pictures and Mutual, will be subject 
of cover story in July 16 issue of Newsweek 
magazine. 



FCC Takes Back Leesburg Am 

FCC Friday rescinded its June 6 grant of new 
am at Leesburg, Va., to Richard Field Lewis 
Jr. Commission, in setting aside grant (1290 kc, 
1 kw daytime), said that there vyas indication of 
interference between Lewis station and proposal 
of WHVR Hanover Pa. (1280 kc, 1 kw local 
sunset, 500 w nighttime directional), to increase 
daytime power to 5 kw, now in hearing. Mr. 
Lewis had petitioned to intervene in WHVR 
hearing. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 9 



the week in brief 



RADIO SPOT ON INCREASE 

Monthly spot radio billings report 
launched by Station Representatives 
Assn. shows May 1956 27% ahead of 
May 1955, with, first five months of 
this year up 17% over same period 
of last year 31 

COLOR'S ON ITS WAY 

Gerald W. Tasker, research vice presi- 
dent of Cunningham & Walsh, tells 
B»T that color set sales will boom in 
1957 and by 1958 color tv will "assume 
importance as an advertising me- 
dium" 32 

COLD REMEDIES MAP CAMPAIGNS 

Increased use of radio and television 
for cold remedy advertising seen as fall 
campaigns are planned 33 

AGENCIES PRE-TEST TV FARE 

N. W. Ayer sets up a color laboratory, 
Kenyon & Eckhardt develops a port- 
able testing machine and BBDO installs 
a closed circuit video system, all with 
purpose of trying out tv programs or 
commercials before they are broad- 
cast 34 

THE MEANING OF RATINGS 

Statistical error adds latitude to rating 
figures and to cost-per-thousand and 
complicates timebuying. Jerome M. 
Sachs of Doyle Dane Bernbach ex- 
plains what happens and what to do 
about it .34 

NEW PROOF TV CAN SELL AUTOS 

Advert est survey for NBC supports 
findings of ABC-TV and TvB studies 
that television is best advertising me- 
dium for automobiles and best liked by 

dealers 39 

IS FCC SERIOUS? 

Broadcasters doubt that Commission 
really expects tv to move into uhf or 
that more than two or three markets 
will be deintermixed 52 



departments 

Advertisers & Agencies 32 

At Deadline 7 

Awards 91 

Closed Circuit 5 

Colorcasting 43 

Editorials 106 

Education 92 

Film % 46 

Film Maker 28 



PAPERWORK' DELAYS FILING 

Crow ell-Collier applications for station 
acquisitions are being held up by "un- 
finished paperwork," but company still 
expects to begin operating its 10 radio- 
tv stations by end of year 58 

KVOO-TV'S $600 COLOR SYSTEM 

Station engineering staff develops meth- 
od for broadcasting black-and-white 
slides in color 64 

THERE'S MONEY IN MULTIPLEXING 

Fulltime multiplexing pays off for 
KTKT-FM Tucson and opens avenue 
to previously untouchable business, 
Tom Wallace Jr., chief engineer, re- 
ports 72 

NBC'S $16 MILLION BASEBALL BUY 

Network signs five-year contract for ex- 
clusive radio-tv rights to World Series 
and All-Star Games, 1957-61, at $3,- 
250,000 per year 79 

NO POLITICAL RULE CHANGE SEEN 

Bills designed to change rules for radio- 
tv treatment of election year broadcasts 
by parties and candidates seem likely 
to die in committee as Congress ad- 
journment nears 82 

POLITICAL PACE ACCELERATES 

Chicago broadcasters and facilities 
people step up activities with opening 
of Democratic National Convention 
only five weeks off 84 

SET SALES RISE IN MAY 

Retail sales of radios (not including 
auto sets) topped April sales by 20%; 
tv set sales are also up for month .87 

COLOR SALES PACE QUICKENS 

Sylvania analysis of tv receiver pur- 
chases over last 18 months shows 40,- 
000 color sets sold in second quarter of 
this year, compared to 1,000 in first 
quarter of 1955 88 



For the Record 98 

Government 52 

In Review 14 

International 90 

Lead Story 31 

Manufacturing 87 

Networks 79 

Open Mike 20 



Our Respects 26 

Personnel Relations . . 78 

Playback 48 

Political Broadcasting. 82 

Professional Services 78 

Program Services 50 

Programs & Promotion 93 

Stations 58 

Trade Assns. 87 



coming in h»t the texas market story 

Another in B»T's continuing series on U. S. economic development. July 23 



Page 10 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting Publications Inc. 

Sol Taishoff 
President 



Maury Long 
Vice President 



H. H. Tash 
Secretary 



B. T. Taishoff 
Treasurer 




BROADCASTING 
TELECASTING 




THE BUS I NESS WEEKLY OF RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Published Every Monday by Broadcasting 
Publications Inc. 

Executive and Publication Headquarters 
Broadcasting * Telecasting Bldg. 
1735 DeSales St., N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 
Telephone: MEtropolitan 8-1022 
EDITOR & PUBLISHER: Sol Taishoff 
MANAGING EDITOR: Edwin H. James 
SENIOR EDITORS: Rufus Crater (New York), J. 

Frank Beatty, Bruce Robertson 
NEWS EDITOR: Fred Fitzgerald 
SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR: David Glickman 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Earl B. Abrams, Lawrence 

Christopher (Hollywood) 
ASST. TO MANAGING EDITOR: Donald V. West 
ASSISTANT EDITOR: Harold Hopkins 
STAFF WRITERS: Ray Ahearn, Jacqueline Eagle, 
Dawson Nail, Munsey Slack, Lamar Underwood 
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS: Hilma Blair, John Sheldon, 

Ann Tasseff 
SECRETARY TO THE PUBLISHER: Gladys L. Hall 

BUSINESS 

VICE PRESIDENT & GENERAL MANAGER: Maury Long 
SALES MANAGER: Winfield R. Levi (New York) 
SOUTHERN SALES MANAGER: Ed Sellers 
PRODUCTION MANAGER: George L. Dant 
TRAFFIC MANAGER: Harry Stevens 
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: Wilson D. McCarthy 
ADVERTISING ASSISTANTS: M. Gwen Moore, Jessie 
Young 

AUDITOR-OFFICE MANAGER: Irving C. Miller 
ASSISTANT AUDITOR: Eunice Weston 
SECRETARY TO GENERAL MANAGER: Eleanor Schadi 
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CIRCULATION & READER'S SERVICE 

MANAGER: John P. Cosgrove 
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SENIOR EDITOR: Rufus Crater 
AGENCY EDITOR: Florence Small 
ASST. NEW YORK EDITOR: David W. Berlyn 
NEW YORK FEATURES EDITOR: Rocco Famighetti 
STAFF WRITERS: Frank P. Model, Selma Gersten. 
Beverly Berl 

Business 

SALES MANAGER: Winfield R. Levi 
SALES SERVICE MANAGER: Eleanor R. Manning 
EASTERN SALES MANAGER: Kenneth Cowan 
ADVERTISING ASSISTANT: Donna Trolinger 

CHICAGO 

360 N. Michigan Ave., Zone 1, CEntral 6-4115 
MIDWEST NEWS EDITOR: John Osbon 
MIDWEST SALES MANAGER: Warren W. Middleton, 
Barbara Kolar 

HOLLYWOOD 
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ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Lawrence Christopher 
WESTERN SALES MANAGER: Bill Merritt, Virginia 
Bialas 

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James Montagnes 

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION 
Annual subscription for 52 weekly issues: $7.00. Annual 
•ubscription including BROADCASTING Yearbook (53d 
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ADDRESS CHANGE: Please send requests to Circulation 
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*Reg. U. S. Patent Office 
Copyright 1956 by Broadcasting Publications Inc. 



Broadcasting 



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The KOMO-TV news staff was first at the crash scene. In 
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But the quality of KOMO-TV leadership extends beyond "firsts." Speed and 
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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 11 




LEADING TV ADVERTISERS RUSH TO SIGN 

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THE VIC DAMONE SHOW 

THE PRODUCERS of The Vic Damone Show, 
which premiered last Monday as the summer 
replacement for December Bride, have a fine 
if somewhat unorthodox idea for their pro- 
gram: Vic Damone is a singer, so his program 
should give him ample opportunity to sing. 
He is not a comedian, so the comedy routines 
should be left to others on the show. Since 
presumably most of his viewers will be those 
who like to hear and see the popular songs of 
the day sung by the popular singers of the 
day, Vic's guests should include at least one 
top feminine singer. 

Adherence to this formula got the new 
series off to a good start, if a pleasant, low- 
pressure half-hour is what is wanted — and 
after having spent the preceding half-hour 
watching the new Charles Farrell series, it 
was precisely right for this viewer. Spring 
Byington, welcoming Vic as her summer re- 
placement, was graciously scatter-brained; 
Buddy Hackett was loudly comic; Shirley Jones 
was sweetly soprano; Pier Angeli (Mrs. Da- 
mone) was proudly wifely and Vic himself was 
in fine voice and had plenty of chance to dis- 
play it. 

In the Vic Damone Show, CBS-TV has a 
good means of luring many televiewers away 
from the Robert Montgomery dramas on NBC- 
TV and providing a ready-made audience for 
its own Studio One productions. 

Production costs: Approximately $25,000. 
Sponsored by General Foods Corp. (Maxwell 

House Coffee) through Benton & Bowles, 

on CBS-TV, Mon., 9:30-10 p.m. 
Star: Vic Damone. 

Producer-director: Don Appel; music by Tutti 
Camarata. 

LISTENING POST 

ABC RADIO'S initial broadcast of Listening 
Post, a new pre-convention political summary 
Sunday evening series that will be aired up 
to the time of the August conventions, used less 
of the immediacy that radio can offer and more 
of the incidental or obvious associated with the 
political scene as of July 1. 

ABC and Newsweek correspondents pooled 
their efforts to sum up the candidates in the 
running for the Democratic nomination for 
President. An unexciting portrayal, the recap 
at least served to emphasize there are many 
contenders — apparently all willing to serve on 
the Democratic ticket. Unfortunately, the par- 
ticipating correspondents had to stick fast to 
summary since the week preceding had been 
rather dull in both political camps. 

Production costs: Approximately $2,000. 

Broadcast July 1 by ABC Radio, sustaining, 
7:35-8 p.m. EDT, the first of a weekly series. 

Producer: Bryson Rash, ABC, Washington. 
Program introduced by Malcolm Muir, chair- 
man of Newsweek's editorial board. Par- 
ticipants included Mr. Rash: Ernest K. 
Lindley, Robert H. Fleming (Chicago), Sam- 
uel Shaffer, Kenneth Crawford, all News- 
week; Richard Rendell, ABC, Washington; 
C. W. Orcutt, Knoxville News Sentinel, and 
Herbert Trask, St. Louis Post-Dispatch. 

THE CHARLIE FARRELL SHOW 

"FARRELL, veteran film star, will play him- 
self, owner of the exclusive Racquet Club in 
Palm Springs, in a comedy series which will 
explore the problems of the inhabitants of the 
resort." So reads the CBS-TV news release 
heralding this summer series. And as far as it 
goes it is an apt description. But it fails to 



mention that the story line, of last Monday's 
opener at any rate, is more silly than funny, 
even when judged by situation comedy stand- 
ards of silliness — even, in fact, when judged by 
summer replacement situation comedy stand- 
ards. 

The high point of the show was the escape of 
three grown men, dressed only in hospital half- 
length gowns, from a hospital in a laundry 
hamper. If the other installments are of the 
same caliber, the series will be no threat to 
/ Love Lucy, which it replaces for the summer. 

Production costs: Approximately $30,000. 

Sponsored by Procter & Gamble Co. (Lilt) 
through Grey Adv. and General Foods 
through Young & Rubicam on alternate 
week basis on CBS-TV, Mon., 9-9:30 p.m. 

Produced by Hal Roach Studios. 

Star: Charles Farrell. Featured players: 
Charles Winninger, Richard Deacon, Leon 
Askin, Ann Lee, Kathryn Card. 

Creative producer: Gordon B. Hughes; studio 
producer: Hal Roach Jr. 

"CYPRUS TODAY" 

ALL THAT WAS physically missing in way 
of props during last Sunday's You Are There 
was the small sign reading "CBS-TV Studio 
41." It mattered little. With or without that 
distinct Murrow-touch, the program was still 
a capsule See It Now. 

If the 30 minutes allowed them wasn't suf- 
ficient time in which to spell out the full im- 
plications of the EOKA's "Enossis" or "union 
with Greece" demand, it did serve CBS news- 
men Cronkite and Smith's purposes to bring 
a distant battleground into clearer focus. True, 
the editors glossed over the salient fact that 
the Cypriote muddle is more diplomatic in 
nature than nationalistic (skipping the entire 
House of Commons debate on the exiling of 
Archbishop Markarios, relying only on the 
views of Military Governor Sir John Harding as 
representative of the West), but at the same 
time, they crammed what little time there was 
with gripping scenes of bloodshed and rioting 
and with dispassionate commentaries on what's 
at stake on all three sides — Greece, Turkey and 
England. 

In keeping with You Are There's traditional 
impartiality, newsmen Smith and Cronkite 
steered clear of controversy, pointed up only 
that it is "extremely hard" to take sides in 
this ironical struggle among three NATO 
partners, inasmuch as all factions stand on 
solid argumentive grounds, and furthermore 
that the U. S. owns copper mines that provide 
l A of Cypriote income. As a departure from 
the routine format (". . . instead of taking you 
back in time, we will take you away in 
distance . . ."), "Cyprus Today" was indeed 
on time. 

Production costs: Approximately $30,000. 

Sponsored by Prudential Life Insurance Co., 
Hartford, Conn., through Calkins & Holden, 
N. Y., on CBS-TV, Sun., 6:30-7 p.m. EDT. 

Produced by CBS News & Public Affairs for 
Prudential; producers: Les Midgely and Bill 
Weinstein; director: Vent Diamond; narra- 
tors: Walter Cronkite and Howard K. Smith. 

KAISER ALUMINUM HOUR 

WITH THE advent of the Kaiser Aluminum 
Hour last Tuesday in the spot formerly occu- 
pied by Pontiac's Playwrights '56, tv got its 
fourth aluminum sponsor (the others being 
Aluminium Ltd., Reynolds and Alcoa) and rid 
itself of that pointless appendix, the third act. 
It's high time, too, and here's a salute to 



Page 14. • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 






pay 50% less . . . 
get 50% more ! 

In Philadelphia, when you buy 
twelve 10- or 20-second an- 
nouncements per week any- 
where on the wrcv-tv schedule, 
wrcv-tv's "12-50 plan" gives 
you an immediate 50% discount 
on all "B," "C" and "D" 
time announcements ! 

WRCV-TV 'S NEW ' ' 12-50 DIVIDEND 

plan" gives you an extra bonus 
of 50% — one station break in 



what a 
combination 

for 
saving ! 



kind for every two purchased 
between 9 a.m. and 5 :59 p.m., 
Sunday through Saturday ! 

This money-saving combination 
delivers over 5 million sales im- 
pressions per week . . . for as 
little as 13^ per thousand ! Get 
the details today, from . . . 

WRCV-TV-3 



SOLD BY I.MSCl SPOT SALES 



mfi][H TELEVISION'S LEADERSHIP 
W* , STATION IN PHILADELPHIA 
TED WALWORTH, JR., Sales Manager 




Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 15 



SUPERMARKET! 

$160 MILLION 
WORTH OF GOODS 
SOLD LAST YEAR IN 
METROPOLITAN MACON! 

Here's dramatic proof that Macon is truly 
the supermarket of fast-expanding Middle 
Georgia. The Macon market, with a 41.6% 
increase in retail sales during the past five 
years, topped all but three of the nation's 
top 25 markets in sales growth. Macon 
retailers last year rang up a total of nearly 
$160 million in sales. This industrially- rich, 
agriculturally-prosperous area is on the 
move . . . and fast! 

TWO STATIONS— AND TWO ALONE 
GIVE YOU OVER-ALL COVERAGE 

WMAZ and WMAZ- 
TV continue to domi- 
nate Middle Georgia's 
broadcast audiences. 
Your audience surveys 
document this . . . time 
and time again. And 
there's a reason for 
this, too . . . 

GOOD BROADCASTING 
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE 

Add it up : Imaginative local programming. 
Top network offerings. Middle Georgia's 
finest facilities. Skillful promotion. Results 
command 'the attention of all Middle Georgia. 

THESE STATIONS 
MOVE MERCHANDISE: 



WMAZ 

10,000 Watts-940 Kc-CBS 
MEMBER: GEORGIA BIG 5 

WMAZ-TV 

Channel 13-CBS-ABC-NBC 

Represented 
Nationally by: 

AVERY- KNODEL, INC. 




IN REVIEW 



Worthington Miner for lobbying that bill 
through to safe passage. 

Though at times "The Army Game" by 
Loring D. Mandel and Mayo Simon tended to 
resemble a cross between Calder Willingham's 
"End as a Man" and Jim Moser's Medic series, 
it turned out to be one of the most powerful 
studies of man's psychiatric disintegration to 
hit television. There is litttle point in re-hash- 
ing the story of the Oedipus-complexed draftee 
striving for a Section 8 discharge since, if 
it seemed far too involved for even the writers, 
how are we to explain it here? Suffice to say, 
it was a far cut above the run-of-the-mill 
Freudian epics on tv that have driven one tv 
critic to refer to it as "couch 4" instead of 
channel 4. 

With annual sales of $330 million and profits 
of $40 million for the fiscal year ending May 
1956 (to quote Fortune), Kaiser Aluminum 
& Chemical Corp. could well afford the best in 
its initial tv effort. This they did: at their dis- 
posal throughout the series will be Mr. Miner, 
Fielder Cook, George Roy Hill and Franklin 
Schaffner, banded together as "Unit Four." 
For "Army Game," they had a top notch cast 
comprising, among others, Paul Newman, Pat 
McVey and Edward Andrews. At this clip, 
Kaiser Hour promises to be the sleeper of the 
season. 

Only one complaint: Some sponsors, notably, 
George Romney of American Motors Corp., 
are born actors, and should be utilized when- 
ever possible in the institutional advertising 
portions of the program. Henry J. Kaiser is a 
born genius and industrialist. Let's leave it at 
that, fellows. 

Production costs: Approximately $45,000. 

Sponsored by Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical 
Corp. through Young & Rubicam on NBC- 
TV, alternate Tuesdays, 9:30-10:30 p.m. 
EDT. 

Opener: "The Army Game" by Loring D. 
Mandel and Mayo Simon. Cast: Paul New- 
man, Pat McVey, Edward Andrews, George 
Grizzard, Frank Campanella, Philip Abbott, 
James Pritchett, Burt Brinckerhoff, Haila 
Stoddard, Betsy Meade and others. 

Executive producer: Worthington Miner; pro- 
ducer-director: Franklin Schaffner; assoc. pro- 
ducer: Joseph Dackow; script editor: Marian 
Searchinger; casting: James Merrick; pro- 
gram supervisor: Joseph Cuneff. 

PRESS CONFERENCE 

MARTHA ROUNTREE acted kind of flustered 
at the debut of her new news, and newsworthy, 
show last Wednesday night. And well she 
might. Already it has become controversial 
within the journalism field. 

According to Miss Rountree's own announce- 
ment, only those government figures who have 
news breaks to announce will be invited as 
guests on her program. This has pricked the 
aplomb of newspaperdom — to the quick. Even 
the august Editor & Publisher showed its ten- 
der skin in anguished remonstrances about the 
awful idea of a government official saving a 
public announcement for a tv appearance. 

Well, we can sympathize with our pen-and- 
pencil pals, but we don't know whether we'll 
go along wholeheartedly with their plaint. The 
first Press Conference was a dilly and we won- 
der only if Miss Rountree can keep it up. Her 
cast was top notch. Attorney General Herbert 
Brownell Jr. was quizzed by such Washintgon 
journalistic notables as Richard L. Wilson, 
Cowles; Lyle C. Wilson, UP; Raymond P. 



Brandt, St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Ruth S. Mont- 
gomery, New York Daily News; Paul Wooten, 
New Orleans Times-Picayune; Marguerite Hig- 
gins, New York Herald Tribune; David P. 
Sentner, Hearst newspapers, among a host of 
others. 

And news was made. Mr. Brownell an- 
nounced officially the filing of the antitrust 
complaint against General Motors. He was 
questioned about his thoughts on Supreme 
Court vs. state's rights, President Eisenhower's 
attitude toward renomination in the light of his 
recent operation, the attacks on Chief Justice 
Warren, the Donovan book, subversion in gov- 
ernment, the Charles E. Wilson-Air Force 
fracas, civil rights, etc. 

It was undoubtedly a straight, hard-hitting, 
unstaged news conference. 

Miss Rountree even helped write headlines; 
she recapitulated the news at the close of the 
program — thus not only stealing the newspaper 
boys' dispatches, but helping the desk men 
compose their heads. 

Production Costs: Approximately $12,000. 
Sponsored by Corn Refining Products, through 

John J. O'Leary Assoc. on NBC-TV, Wed., 

8-8:30 p.m. EDT. 
Executive producers: Martha Rountree and 

Oliver M. Presbrey; director: Victor Guidice. 

JOE AND MABEL 

BY OCCUPATIONAL nature, cab drivers 
seem ever ready, willing and able to comment 
on most any subject and offer uninhibited solu- 
tions to pressing problems — at the drop of a 
flag or click of a meter. Cab drivers have prob- 
lems, too, and one of the oldest facing the male 
species since Adam and Eve — avoiding the 
clutches of an altar-minded female — is the for- 
mat for CBS-TV's new Joe and Mabel series. 

The initial program, June 26, dealt with 
Joe's efforts to keep his girl without letting 
her become his wife in too short a time. He 
is determined to remain single until he has 
$750 in the bank, put there by his own efforts, 
and for 30 minutes he resisted first a $500 re- 
ward for returning a bag of jewelry left in his 
cab and then a $500 fee for appearing on a 
tv show in order to prevent his $250 savings 
from reaching the $750 mark so fast. Included 
in the cast of characters was ever-loving Mabel, 
obviously modeled on Adelaide of "Guys and 
Dolls," and an irate boss, wise-cracking mother 
and pestiferous little brother, all replicas of the 
same roles in a dozen other situation comedies. 

Whether by intent or accident, CBS-TV has 
unveiled a program that conceivably could do 
for cabbies on tv what Jackie Gleason did for 
bus drivers and Phil Silvers for Army ser- 
geants. At least, the ingredients are there and 
the format promises possibilities, despite an 
overly-cute first script. As situation comedy, 
however, the show moves sprightly along, not- 
withstanding those "tired blood" commercials 
for Geritol. 

Production costs: Approximately $32,000. 

Sponsored by Pharmaceuticals Inc. (for Geritol) 
through Edward Kletter Assoc. Inc., CBS- 
TV, on Tues., 9-9:30 p.m. EDT. 

Producer-writer: Alex Gottlieb; director: Ezra 
Stone; music supervisor: Raoul Krauschaar. 

Program based on characters created by Irving 
Gaynor Neiman. 

Cast: Larry Blyden as Joe; Nita Talbot as 
Mabel, and Louella Gear, Michael Mann, 
Norman Feld, Ralph Dunn, John Shellie, 
Shirl Conway and Dick Van Dyke. 



Page 18 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




You can't turn 
back time . . . 




that's why . . . 
no one can catch up with 



WKY-Tl 



In 1920, WKY was Oklahoma's first radio station. 

WKY-TV was also Oklahoma's first TV station (1949). 

All these years, we've been building audience loyalty. You can't duplicate 
this any more than you can turn back time. 

Sure, we're first in the ratings. But more important, 

we offer you a share in the lives of our audience. 

So why just talk TO people? Talk WITH them. 

Sell from inside the family circle. 



Owned and Operated by 

THE OKLAHOMA PUBLISHING CO. 

The Daily Oklahoman • Oklahoma City Times 

The Farmer-Stockman • WKY Radio 

WSFA-TV, Montgomery, Ala. 

Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 





Station 




KIDDER, 
PEABODY 
CO.— 

Has an established re- 
lationship with most 
of the important 
sources of investment 
capital in the country. 



• Maintains close con- 
tact with all phases 
of the Television and 
Radio industry. 



We invite the 
station owner to 
take advantage of 
this dual coverage 
when considering 
the sale of his 
property. 



3 MITT 



KIDDER, 
PEABODY & CO. 

FOUNDED 1865 

NEW YORK BOSTON PHILADELPHIA 
CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO 

Offices and correspondents in thirty other 
principal cities in the United States 

Address inquiries to: 
ROBERT E. GRANT 
Kidder, Peabody & Co. 
First National Bank Building 
Chicago 3, Illinois 
Telephone ANdover 3-7350 



OPEN MIKE 



Como Kick 

EDITOR: 

I got quite a kick out of the item on page 
35 of your June 11 issue titled "Six Advertisers 
Signed for Fall Como Program." I am curious 
to know if the information regarding the Gold 
Seal Co. and their advertising agency was ob- 
tained from a release from NBC. 

The reference to Gold Seal Co. and their 
agency is quite incorrect. They are located in 
Bismarck, N. D., and we are their advertising 
agents and have been for the past ten years. 
They manufacture "Glass Wax" and "Snowy" 
bleach. Don't you think a correction would be 
in order? 

B. E. Howard, Vice Pres. & Acct. Sup. 
Campbell-Mithun Inc. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

[EDITOR'S NOTE: Mr. Howard's surmise is right. 
NBC-TV reported Gold Seal's renewal of The 
Perry Como Show through North Adv., Chicago, 
rather than Campbell-Mithun, Minneapolis, as it 
should be.] 

Police Report 

EDITOR: 

It has come to my attention that your report 
of the radio promotion involving Twin Cities 
stations [B«T, June 18] was misleading in several 
particulars. The point which concerns the Min- 
neapolis Police Department is the claim that 
20 policemen were needed to handle the crowd 
at the traffic bottleneck (Hennepin and Lyndale) 
where people were looking for the WDGY prize 
check. 

The true facts are these: We feared that the 
clue naming that intersection would draw 
enough searchers to paralyze traffic in that 
critical point, and so we watched the situation 
closely. At no time was the crowd big enough 
to impede traffic seriously; even during the rush 
hour when the clue was broadcast. 

One park policeman was on duty nearby, and 
one squad car assigned to that part of town 
patrolled the area from time to time. Fortu- 
nately, the situation never became critical, and 
it was not necessary to detail extra officers, as 
the article indicated. 

The Minneapolis Police Department is grate- 
ful to the responsible broadcasters who have 
used their facilities over the years to provide 
essential public services. These stations enjoy 
the respect and confidence of the people. They 
undoubtedly could jam up traffic if they chose 
to exert their influence in that way, but they 
have achieved the reputations they enjoy through 
service — rather than dis-service — to the listen- 
ing public. 

E. I. Walling, Supt. 

Police Department, Minneapolis, Minn. 

[EDITOR'S NOTE: B«T's report was based on in- 
formation received from the stations conducting 
the treasure hunts, WDGY Minneapolis and 
KOWH Omaha.] 

FM: Future Medium 

EDITOR: 

... I have noticed with considerable interest 
the amount of space you've recently given dif- 
ferent parties to express their views on fm. . . . 
It seems to me that fm is the big hole in which 
to look through into a big part of radio's fore- 
seeable future. 

Everyone in the industry knows there are 
close to a thousand am grants under considera- 
tion by the Commission right now. The am band 
is practically saturated. As soon as am alloca- 
tions have reached the jumping off place, and 
it is bound to come, there'll be no place to go 
for the would-be radio station owner . . . 

Fm was struggling along, I am told, and 
making little gain. Am gave it no assistance un- 
less the am station had an fm transmitter sitting 



in it. Still the am transmitter, its big brother, 
gave it little encouragement. To make matters 
worse, up jumped "John Conquer All" television 
which was going to make radio obsolete, an- 
tiquated and chase it off the ether . . . Where 
was fm while all this was going on? Being used 
for old transcription discards, dust racks, old 
program logs, etc. Fm transmitters gradually 
shut down and were being advertised for a 
song. What now? I would like to think am 
stands for an "always medium." Fm will emerge 
from a place where it has stood for a "forgotten 
medium" to a new and rightful place as the 
"future medium". 

How will this be accomplished? By some of 
the manufacturers waking up to the fact that 
they must now develop an inexpensive am-fm 
receiver. The manufacturer can produce an fm 
set with built-in antenna, in the same cabinet 
with an am. To say it can't be done is sheer 
fantasy . . . 

Robert B. Holloman 
WWCS Bremen, Ga. 

Outdoors Indoors 

EDITOR: 

I want to thank you for your understanding 
story about myself and my television series Ad- 
venture Out of Doors [B«T, June 4]. It is re- 
freshing to see a leading magazine reporting an 
enterprise that is relatively small in the industry. 

It is my hope that your story may alert both 
stations and sponsors to the fact that there are 
small producers like myself who are trying to 
do a certain kind of job in and for tv. I have 
often said: "Adventure Out of Doors is no big 
spectacular, yet it will attract an enthusiastic 
audience which will welcome the outdoors in- 
doors!" 

I believe that the real future of my hunting, 
fishing and wildlife series is still ahead as color 
comes into its own because the outdoors is color 
itself. 

Jack Van Coevering 

Van Coevering Productions 

Chicago 

Permission Granted 

EDITOR: 

Beginning later this month, we plan to publish 
a bi-weekly newsletter for our clients and 
prospects among agencies and advertisers. 

Our newsletter, Film Clips, will discuss 
current production at Keitz & Herndon and 
will include short quotations of new ideas and 
pertinent information on film production from 
the leading trade magazines. 

May we have your permission to quote from 
Broadcasting • Telecasting? We will, of 
course, give a credit line to your publication 
for any quotation we use. 

Larry F. Herndon Jr. 

Ptnr. and Sis. Mgr. 

Keitz & Herndon, Dallas, Tex. 

Sales Aid 

EDITOR: 

Many times I have noticed accounts which 
I couldn't ever seem to sell. All at once for 
some reason they would call and want spots. 
Invariably I would discover their company had 
sent them some spots and pointed out the value 
of radio. 

If some organization could work on the large 
companies to each send out such a brochure, 
pointing to radio's advantages in both large and 
small markets, I believe it would give radio 
quite a spurt. A salesman can talk 'til he's blue 
in the face and not get anywhere, but these 
little booklets sent to some merchants are really 



Page 20 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



it's a 
matter of 

balance.. 



Strength, too. But the successful weight lifter 
starts in the center— not just at one end. 

Likewise, astute advertisers seeking profits in 
our Upper Ohio Valley, look to WSTV-TV, with 
its tri-state coverage of over one million 
television sets . . at Steubenville-Wheeling, 
humming hub of 1 1 bustling counties. By the 
selves, they're chocka-block with nearly two 
billion spending money, half a billion 
retail sales. 



lalf a bil 



But — SEVEN of these 11 bulge with 
64% of the buying power, 61 % of 
the television families. AND TELE- 
PULSE SHOWS WSTV-TV SMOTHERING 
COMPETITION IN THE WHOLE BIG 
SEVEN! 



No w 



Jowa^araun^oVSTV^^STneonT^u^j 

means to capture this superabundant market. 
Get a firm grip on your share today — lift your- 
self a record-smashing load of sales! Get 
details, too, from Avery-Knodel about our big 
Pittsburgh plus! 



CBS-ABC AFFILIATE 





IN PLUMB CENTER OF INDUSTRIAL STEUBENVILLE-WHEELING 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



WE 



HEARTILY 
RECOMMEND 
AND 
ENDORSE 



Carolyn Skotdar Gfssociates 



30 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK 16, N.Y. 



KTVO 



CHANNEL 



3 



OTTUMWA, IOWA 

James J. Conroy, President 



'OPEN MIKE- 



effective. It will help the companies by having 
their outlets more advertising minded and it will 
certainly help radio. 

John W. Ecklin, Gen. Mgr. 
KLOV Loveland, Colo. 

Good Works 

EDITOR: 

. . . Your Yearbooks are among the most 
useful reference books we have in our office. 
Rev. Clayton T. Griswold, D.D. 
Executive Director, Dept. of Radio & Tv 
Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 
New York City. 

Proposal 

EDITOR: 

Everyone is familiar with the difficulties that 
the movie industry is now having nationwide 
because of television. Everyone in the broad- 
casting industry knows that radio was having 
the same difficulty. However, I have never had 
any qualms about radio being able to pull out 
of it and that seems exactly to be what is hap- 
pening at the present time. 

I propose this, the movie industry making 
available to the am broadcasting industry an 
edited version of their sound track on all of 
their better movies free of charge to any station 
all over the country that wants them. 

For example, they have the technical know- 
how in Hollywood and they could take the 
sound from say, "The Conqueror", edit the long 
visual scenes, dub in appropriate music and 
you have a top notch radio show of approxi- 
mately one and one-half hours. Breaks could be 
inserted in these shows of 30 seconds and one 
minute. The movie industry could release these 
shows approximately 60 days before the show- 
ing of the film and you have a ready made 
audience champing at the bit to see the show. 
R. D. McGregor, Gen. Mgr. 
KBNZ La Junta, Colo. 

Testimonial 

EDITOR: 

You said some pretty nice things about my 
former boss, Robert W. Carpenter, in the July 2 
issue of B«T, but you left out the most im- 
portant thing to me. 

Your "Our Respects" column could have in- 
cluded that Bob is one of the best guys to work 
for in all of New York. He's the least phony, 
most down-to-earth human being I ever had 
the pleasure of working for. And in my seven 
years in New York radio I had some dandies. 
John Buning 

WTSP St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Australian Invitation 

EDITOR: 

. . . The Melbourne Time Club extends a 
warm welcome to any American radio execu- 
tives who may be coming to Australia for the 
1956 Olympic Games. 

We are a body of station sales managers, 
sales executives and representatives, engaged 
in the sale of radio time and programs. Our 
primary objective is the furtherance of good 
public relations between advertising agencies, 
their clients and ourselves. 

It is our intention to extend honorary mem- 
bership of the Time Club to our overseas 
visitors who are also engaged in commercial 
radio, so that mutual benefits may be obtained 
from these contacts. 

We should be happy to hear from anyone 
proposing to visit these shores. 

G. S. Fawcett, Hon. Secy.-Treas. 
The Time Club 
Melbourne, Australia 



Page 22 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 23 



WFMY-TV 

holds the Greensboro 

50-county AREA spellbound • I 




11 city weighted composite TREHDEX report - April, 1956 



DAYTIME — sets in use, 18.1 

AVERAGE AVERAGE 

RATING SHARE 

WFMY-TV 1 2.6 69.6 

second station 2.5 13.8 

third station 0.7 3.9 

fourth station 1 .4 7.7 

all others 0.9 5.0 



NIGHT-TIME -sets in use, 47.0 

AVERAGE 



WFMY-TV 
second station 
third station 
fourth station 
all others 



RATING 
27.8 
9.1 
3.1 
4.1 
2.4 



AVERAGE 
SHARE 
59.1 
19.3 
6.6 
9.8 
6.0 






TRENDEX proves it 



Our Pied Piper of The Piedmont rates the warmest welcome in 
these 11 key communities — as well as all the others — making 
up the rich Greensboro market-place! The weighted composite 
Trendex Report for April shows WFMY-TV's average daytime 
rating at an impressive 12.6! That's five times better 
than the next-best station! And night-time? A whopping 27.8 
— over three times the latter's average rating! 



IN FACT — according to the same Trendex — WFMY-TV 
produces a higher average daytime . . and a higher 
average night-time . . rating in these 1 1 cities than 
ALL of the region's nine other stations put together! 

Here's resounding evidence of how WFMY-TV's mighty 100,000 watts 
on Channel 2 has a boarding-house reach extending across 50 
North Carolina and Virginia counties. Glowing proof, too, that WFMY-TV's 
seven years of carefully-planned local originations and arresting CBS-TV 
programs make it the undisputed television favorite of the rich Piedmont. 

And what an area this Piedmont is! Alive with growing industry . . packed 
with nearly two-and-a-half billions of spending money . . thronging with 
more than two million customers . . and vibrant with selling opportunities! 

There's only ONE station that can deliver ALL of it for you. WFMY-TV, of 
course! Fall in behind our Pied Piper's profitable footsteps and whistle 
yourself up a handsome share of its super-sales. Your Harrington, 
Righter and Parsons man knows the tune. Call him today! 



tuf my-tv 




GREENSBORO. N. C. 

Represented by 

Harrington, Righter & Parsons, Inc. 
New York — Chicago — San Francisco — Atlanta 




Now In Our 
Seventh Year 




More 

FARM FAMILIES 
LISTEN TO.., 
BELIEVE IN... 
AND ARE 
INFLUENCED BY 

tctvro 





GAD 10 

THAN ANV 
OTHER RADIO 
STATION IN 
THE 

TWO BILUON 
DOLLAR 

MARKET? 

my? 

Because only KWTO maintains 
a full-time Farm Service Director 
and Assistant ... a modern ex- 
perimental farm . . . a policy of 
programming that works for and 
with farmers, County Agents, 
Home Economists, 4-H and Fu- 
ture Farmers and AG students to 
keep them constantly informed 
and entertained. 

FOR PROOF OF KWTO LEADER- 
SHIP AND COMPLETE INFOR- 
MATION, CALL, WIRE, WRITE: 

The 

. Ozark's 
y J Farm 
Service 
Station 
1121 S. Glenstone- 
Springfield, Mo. 

'Home of the OZARK JUBILEE" 
■ 

Represented Nationally 
By JOHN E. PEARSON CO. 




our respects 



to JOHN ELROY McCAW 



BROADCASTING brims over with stories 
of young men who have parlayed ideas and 
sweat into business empires, but few surpass the 
achievements of Elroy McCaw in the decade 
following World War II. 

Now identified with the ownership of three 
tv and six radio stations, Mr. McCaw was the 
31 -year-old owner of little KELA in Centralia, 
Wash., when he was called to active duty in 
Washington in 1942 as a second lieutenant in 
the Air Force. His service rise was meteoric. He 
soon became assistant executive officer to Air 
Force Chief Gen. Hap Arnold, and then ex- 
ecutive officer to Brig. Gen. H. M. McClelland, 
in charge of Air Force Communications, with 
rank of lieutenant colonel. 

During his military activity, Col. McCaw 
decided that, once out of uniform, he would 
embark upon radio station operation in other 
areas. He soon demonstrated his prowess as 
a negotiator and as an excellent judge of 
people. He had the knack of selecting the 
right people for the appropriate slots. 

Today, Mr. McCaw owns KTVW (TV) Seat- 
tle-Tacoma in his own name; 100% of KORC 
Mineral Wells, Tex.; 75% of KTVR (TV) 
Denver, 75% of WINS New York. 50% of 
KELA Centralia, 50% of KYA San Francisco, 
33%% of KALE Richland and KYAK Yaki- 
ma, both Wash., and 25% of KONA (TV) 
Honolulu. Mrs. McCaw owns KAPA Raymond, 
Wash. 

As a high school student in Aberdeen, 
Wash., he dabbled in breadboard circuits in 
his spare time. During his senior year he 
worked parttime at KXRO Aberdeen, then 
and now operated by Harry R. Spence. After 
graduation in 1929 he worked a year for West- 
ern Electric Co., installing switchboard equip- 
ment around the Northwest and receiving his 
first-class engineer's ticket. 

Back in school at Grays Harbor Junior Col- 
lege, in the Aberdeen area, he again worked at 
KXRO as operator-announcer. From junior 
college he moved eastward to Washington State 
College, at Pullman, where he specialized in 
radio engineering and business administration. 
Again he worked in a radio station on the side, 
finally becoming manager of non-commercial 
KWSC on the campus. He graduated in 1943. 

Having served at both commercial and non- 
commercial stations, Mr. McCaw showed a 
preference for the former. He and a cousin, 
Robert McCaw, started work on a plan to 
establish a regional network in the Northwest 
along the order of the Yankee Network in New 
England. It never got off the ground. 

Not discouraged, Mr. McCaw applied for a 
broadcast license in Centralia, Wash., receiving 
the grant in 1937. At that point he had achieved 
a major goal — ownership and operation of his 




own station. He ran this project successfully 
until 1942, when he joined the Air Force. 

In the Pacific, Mr. McCaw had a hunch that 
led, after the war, to a second broadcast pro- 
ject. With his friend, Jack Keating, whom he 
had met while in service, he applied for a 
broadcast license in Honolulu. KPOA went on 
the air in October 1946. Because of the long 
water haul from the mainland, the KPOA 
owners set up a recording service called Radio 
Central. They bought the State Dept. radio 
studios in the Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, 
and ran the program recording operation, with 
transcriptions shipped by air to KPOA. 

A few years later Mr. McCaw bought KYA 
San Francisco from Dorothy Schiff. This tied 
in naturally with the KPOA operation and the 
setup was headquartered in the Fairmont. 
About the same time Mr. McCaw joined with 
Hugh B. Terry, Ted Gamble and others in the 
purchase of KLZ Denver. He later added KILA 
Hilo, Hawaii; KRSC Seattle, KYAK Yakima, 
KALE Richmond and KORC Mineral Wells, 
Tex. Mr. Keating was joint owner of KPOA, 
KYA and KILA. 

When he contracted to buy WINS New York 
from the Crosley interests. Mr. McCaw sold his 
KLZ and KPOA interests to stay within the 
FCC multiple-ownership regulations. The group 
had been built up from earnings of the stations. 

KTVR, the former KFEL-TV Denver, is 
owned by Gotham Broadcasting Corp. (WINS) 
and Founders Corp., headed by John Shaheen. 
KONA (TV) was one of the early economic 
casualties in television, having started in 1952 as 
KGMB-TV. With the Honolulu Advertiser, 
Messrs. McCaw and Keating bought the station, 
changing the call letters to KONA. "I have con- 
siderable faith in the future of major-market 
independent television stations," Mr. McCaw 
said. KTVR and KTVW are independents. 

His confidence in radio's future is voiced 
in this manner. "Radio's opportunity to serve the 
public is actually expanding and by and large 
radio has successfully adapted itself to the 
impact of television." 

John Elroy McCaw was born Sept. 15, 1911, 
in Colfax, Wash., in the eastern part of the 
state. His father was a civil engineer. After 
starting KELA in Centralia he married the 
former Marion Oliver, of that city. They have 
four children — Bruce 10, Craig 7, John 5 and 
Keith 2Yz. 

In Seattle he is active in civic and business 
affairs. Affiliations include Seattle Golf & 
Country Club, Phi Sigma Kappa (college), 
Washington Athletic Club, Seattle Yacht Club 
and a state government reorganization move- 
ment. Industry activities include Radio Adver- 
tising Bureau board and two years as president 
of Washington State Broadcasters Assn. 



Page 26 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




Advertising in 

which radio television publication 
has the most impact on you? 



This spring a research firm* asked 4,584 radio, tv 
and advertising executives to check which of seven 
trade papers delivered the most advertising im- 
pact. 57.1% chose B»T. Runner-up: 18.7%. 
None of the other five was mentioned by as 
much as 6%. 



* Erdos and Morgan; survey was "blind" with 
sponsorship undisclosed. 1,936 replies were 
received. Complete summary upon request 
to B«T. 




Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 27 




• re laxin ' at home 




or rollin' on the road . . . 
FLINT TUNES TO 

134 MWSCASTS 

A WEEK on WKMF 



every hour 
°n the hour 



'J " ° nd Wi,h tha * ™ny newscasts WKMP - 

: e :" m ,hinks « — - e ^i^ Q nr, F,int! when any °- e 

news ,e 3o(ar , y , eyery houf "« f the s,a»,on that gives him 




SAVE. 

up to 




15% 



Slf U i n9 2or Mt "-e of 

w^u OWerful S ' a «ons 
WKMH WKMF VWHM imcam 

BUY ANY 3 S S f AVE ,5 % 

BUY ANY 2 STATIONS. 'save 



WKMF 



E| /; ed A- Knorr, P res . 
t'don Garner, Mg. Direct 



FLINT, 
MICHIGAN 




Page 28 • ^ 9> m( . 




BERNARD L. SCHUBERT 



film 

maker 




MAKING Fir iwe * 

business with Bernard I. tut" h strict, y 
ness means «2K? « S ? h ubert, but busi- 

ability" of the fi,m # a " ention to "sell- 
m«*h a. 4 ^maS ofS° n f ^ Sp ° nsor « 
For years Well known f the Producer. 

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«>to tv at an early da'te ^ be ? pIun S ed 
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Born Aug 26 1Q17 • £ fi,m Programming, 
bert waf saturated ^ith ^ Y ?*' Mr ' Schu - 
the start. hS ZLTL^ bUSiness fr °m 
Professional eSS's £Z F* ? m fa the 
Played summer stock he a ' S ° 

He attended the II n f u 
year before jumpL into £ nn h SyIvania ** a 
In 1937 he ioined the Phill PS hTo^ W ° rJd - 
nation in charge of exnln , P ^° rd or S an - 
Property rights^ varTo^dia^kf ^ ^ 
magazines, books anH „ , lke movies, 

In 1939 he be car ne 1alS m 1 S DOt radio - 

thi Tw° n ss iFP^z sx ed 

hims^f/Svelopg .cJT ^ b ™*™ for 
of the Falcon ?L^ Z r Spy > Ad ™ntures 
Mrs. North A iZf m l M *' Malone > Mr - & 
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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 29 



I 



Tallest antenna in the Central South— 
1756' above average terrain! 



KTHV HAS: 



Basic CBS affiliation — Channel 11 — 
316,000 watts! 



KTHV HAS: 



Central South's finest and most com- 
plete television facilities — completely 
new building, four camera chains, two 
large studios, 20' revolving turn-table, 
fully-equipped kitchen, etc.! 



Ask your Branham man for the new 
KTHV coverage story! 



316,000 Watts Channel 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 
B. G. Robertson, General Manager 

AFFILIATED WITH KTHS, LITTLE ROCK, AND KWKH, SHREVEPORT 



BROADCASTING 

TELECASTING 

July 9, 1956 Vol. 51, No. 2 



RADIO SPOT SALES REPORTED 
RUNNING WELL AHEAD OF 1955 

• National spot last May was 27.5% more than year before 

• Station Representatives Assn. issues first regular report 

• SRA says sales reflect resurgence of national spot radio 



RADIO TIME sales of national spot in the first 
five months of this year ran more than 17% 
ahead of the corresponding Jan. -May period 
of last year. 

The spurt in time sales was evident in each 
of the five months, with the highest percentage 
gain in May and the second highest peak in 
February, according to Station Representatives 
Assn.'s long-awaited and first report totaling 
time sales of national spot radio [B»T, May 14]. 
As characterized by SRA, the compilation re- 
flects the "resurgence" of national spot radio. 

Release of the figures by SRA today (Mon- 
day) means that for the first time executives 
in the broadcast business, including media re- 
search, timebuying and selling, as well as ad- 
vertisers, will have available on a regular basis 
monthly dollar figures charting the volume of 
national spot radio. These are net time sales 
after all frequency and promotional discounts 
but before deduction of commissions to agen- 
cies and representatives. 

The data highlighted the following informa- 
tion: 

• A total of $54,258,000 was registered in 
time sales of national spot in radio for the 
January-through-May period of 1956, or 17.8% 
more than the $46,071,000 for the correspond- 
ing months last year. 

• Volume in May was $11,632,000, or an 
increase of 27.5% above the $9,124,000 re- 
corded that month in 1955. 

• National spot's "index" in radio for May 
was plotted as 117.7, using 1954 — latest FCC 
figures available cover 1954 — as the base year. 

• Last year's dollar volume — $114,066,000 
— was a little more than $6 million below 
that of 1954, but this year's total as of last 
May has been running nearly 12% above. 

• While the average increase for the five 



months was 17.8%, three of the months — 
January, February and May — had percentage 
jumps over that level. 

• The highest total for the five-month period 
was recorded in March. This total— $11,699,- 
000 — topped any of the monthly totals during 
1955. 

SRA's dollar volume figures are supplied by 
its membership — encompassing most of the 
radio stations in the U. S. They represent 
gross billing before agency commission but in- 
clude discounts, thus approximating the infor- 
mation that is gathered by FCC and released 
by the government agency on an annual basis. 
However, the Commission's report usually is 
about one year behind — e.g., the 1955 figures 
probably will not be reported by FCC until 
December 1956. 

SRA's first report of dollar volume had a 
little more than one month's delay— May being 
the latest month compiled. In April, television 
Bureau of Advertising released the first of its 
regular quarterly reports on spot television time 
computed at gross one-time rates [B«T, 
April 16]. 

Publishers Information Bureau for some 
time has issued a monthly gross billing com- 
pilation for tv network business on about a 
month's delay but last summer discontinued 
publication of similar totals for network radio. 
Both TvB's and PIB's computations are gross, 
at the one-time rate (before discounts) and be- 
fore agency commission. 

The national spot radio "index" when trans- 
lated means that as of May 1956 this year's 
sales were running 11.7% above the base year 
of 1954, the latest year for which FCC has 
released its figures. According to FCC, spot 
radio in 1954 totaled $120,168,000. 

Adam Young Jr., SRA's president, inter- 



preted the just released figures as indicative 
that the association's long-time efforts to fur- 
nish agencies and advertisers with a current 
picture of spot radio had "borne fruit." Said 
Mr. Young: 

"It is reassuring to all to note the splendid 
recovery of spot radio after two years of de- 
cline. We appreciate the renewed faith that ad- 
vertisers and agencies are showing in this 
growing medium. We are particularly indebted 
to the account executives and media depart- 
ments of agencies for their spot research and 
recommendations to clients." 

Mr. Young thought it "not surprising that 
many advertisers have been enamoured of 
the newest and very productive medium, tele- 
vision, to the partial neglect of the power 
and record of success of spot radio." This, he 
conceded, even when taking into account "the 
amazing current growth in the number of radio 
stations, up to 2,858 in 1,400 markets, and the 
high figures of radio sets sales, both home and 
auto [which] tended to be ignored in part." 

But, he emphasized, "the resurgence has been 
in effect now for eight months, so that radio is 
again moving toward its proper place in the 
media spectrum." 

Lawrence Webb, SRA's managing director, 
reported that interest has been widespread in 
the advertising world since the association an- 
nounced its project in May. He reported that 
many requests had been received for detailed 
figures of the use of spot radio by advertisers 
and brands, but explained that such data could 
only be compiled from station records, al- 
though "we hope that a way will be found to 
solve the problem of gathering and publishing 
these facts." Mr. Webb noted a demand, too, 
for a monthly index figure on spot tv similar 
to what now is being supplied for spot radio. 

Information received from SRA members, 
which supplied both past and current figures, 
was turned over to Price-Waterhouse & Co., 
New York, a professional accounting firm, 
which then processed the raw data. 

When it announced the project last May, 
SRA had predicted that publication of the dol- 
lar volume figures on national spot for the 
whole radio industry would "eliminate the con- 
fusion and guesswork which have been prev- 
alent in advertising circles for too many 
years." 



MONTHLY COMPARISON OF NATIONAL SPOT RADIO TIME SALES 





1956 


1955 


GAIN 


JANUARY 


$10,192,000 


$ 8,556,000 


19.1% 


FEBRUARY 


11,031,000 


8,890,000 


24.1% 


MARCH 


11,699,000 


10,190,000 


14.9% 


APRIL 


9,704,000 


9,311,000 


4.2% 


MAY 


11,632,000 


9,124,000 


27.5% 


TOTAL 


$54,258,000 


$46,071,000 


17.8% 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 31 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



COLOR TV DOOR TO OPEN WIDE 
BY 1958-59, TASKER PREDICTS 

C&W vice president says a million or more color sets needed before 
advertisers will make extensive use of medium and soon after that 
figure is reached, may become one of the nation's top advertising 
tools. Predicts color will be major factor in two years. 



COLOR TV within two years will become 
a major factor of importance in the adver- 
tising plans of agency clients. By 1958, it 
should reach the stage that black-and-white 
television entered six years ago, and soon 
after, may be one of the nation's top adver- 
tising mediums. 

These observations go a long way toward 
answering the big question of when color 
will find the door wide open — and not just 
ajar— at the top level conference room of 
Mr. Advertiser and Mr. Media Selector. 

The man who has come up with answers 
is one of the top researchers along New 
York's agency row: Gerald W. Tasker, a 
vice president and the director of research 
of Cunningham & Walsh. Mr. Tasker has 
been the guiding light for the past eight 
years of C & W's highly-publicized and 
widely-circulated Videotown Survey, an an- 
nual study of the effect of tv on living habits 
of a populace adjudged to be typical of the 
nation. The locale actually is New Bruns- 
wick, N. J. 

In a special interview with B«T, Mr. 
Tasker presented a look to color tv's future, 
basing his observations on the continuous 
evidence available in past Videotown sur- 
veys and on a special study C&W conducted 
only last April, a couple of months before 
color set makers announced new reductions 
in color receiver prices. 

As noted by Mr. Tasker, the Videotown 
study is not precisely a year-to-year affair, 
but actually a running study that is put to 
use from time to time as the occasion war- 
rants. As in the case of color tv in April 
this need often triggers a special look-see at 
Videotown. 



In essence, Mr. Tasker feels: 

• The balance of this year "will see the 
end of the pioneering period" in color tele- 
vision. 

• The next year (1957) "will probably 
be an interim period as 1948 (and into 
1949) was for black-and-white sets. Sales 
of color sets will be booming, but saturation 
will be low — under a million sets." 

• By 1958, "color television will assume 
importance as an advertising medium." 

What happens, meanwhile? In this interim 
— the pre-mass circulation period — "adver- 
tisers are using color telecasts partly to de- 
velop techniques and partly for the prestige 
value derived from being first in this exciting 
new medium." 

From the picture painted by Mr. Tasker, 
one visualizes color tv ownership as a rocket, 
accelerating in speed as it goes on upward, 
then finally bursting outward as it reaches 
the height of its climb. Somewhere along 
that arrowing route, advertisers will be ready, 
willing and able to pick up the tab on a 
basis similar to black-and-white sponsorship. 
The best estimate — sometime between 1958 
and 1959. For then, he says, "there should 
be rapid development and from then on, 
momentum." 

Mr. Tasker thinks in terms of a million 
or more color sets before advertisers can 
consider the medium to be important enough 
to consider and in terms of circulation, a 
total that can stand up to that of a weekly 
consumer magazine. 

Although Mr. Tasker is well aware that 
"the consumer's investment in his black and 
white set" will be one of the "chief retarding 
factors" in color tv's progress toward satu- 



ration, the medium itself "will stimulate the 
replacement rate." 

Says Mr. Tasker: "Set manufacturers are 
announcing vastly improved color tv sets at 
reduced prices. More programs and a great- 
er variety of programs are being telecast in 
color. Chicago's WNBQ (NBC-owned sta- 
tion) is telecasting in color on a full time, 
local basis. Dealers are becoming more en- 
thusiastic, less fearful of the service prob- 
lem." 

Then, he reflects: "All of this mounting 
pressure is bound to break down the public's 
apathy and awake their latent interest in 
owning a color tv set." 

Cunningham & Walsh, he recalls, started 
to "take the pulse" of color tv in 1950 via 
the Videotown survey which for that year 
reported only 8% of the New Brunswick 
set owners were thinking about replacing 
their tv receivers by purchasing color. 

A "false start" in color tv set off a special 
Videotown hunt in December 1950, Mr. 
Tasker observes. The "false start" is Mr. 
Tasker's term, which he uses now to describe 
the lack of color tv interest which occurred 
in spite of widely circulated news reports 
late that year of "the imminence of color tv." 

In the December 1950 survey, 451 fami- 
lies were interviewed on "interest" in color. 
It was found that 80% knew "something" 
about the proposed methods of colorcasting 
but "practically no one had yet seen a color 
telecast." 

Mr. Tasker says the survey found nearly 
everyone who had a tv set then felt the 
"fairly recent" investment in a monochrome 
receiver was "too big to justify replacing the 
set in the near future." Subjectively, set 
owners interviewed felt about color television 
as they would about color motion pictures — 
"they would never select a movie only be- 
cause it had color." People thought story- 
plot and star were far more important, al- 
though color added to their pleasure in see- 
ing the movies — "it would do the same thing 
in the case of color television. But, color 
telecasting was so much a thing of the future 
that interest in buying a color set was prac- 
tically non-existent." 

The ensuing years 1951-1953 were a pe- 
riod of lessening "publicity about the avail- 
ability of color sets," sidetracking them even 
further into the future. Again, Videotown 
annual reports (Nos. 4, 5 and 6) reflected 
the pattern by showing "apathy on the part 
of consumers — color wasn't even mentioned 
as a possibility," according to Mr. Tasker. 

A "slight revival of interest" was noted in 
Videotown report No. 7 in 1954 with about 
8% of tv owners having seen at least one 
color telecast and 9% of those planning a 
receiver replacement asserting they would 
buy a color set if it became available. This 
degree of interest was about double that of 
1950. By last year's study, a jump in figures 
was discernible. Then, more than twice 
(17%) the number of Videotowners had 
seen a color telecast "and most reported 
very favorably on it." A temporary damper, 
however, was the high price of color sets 
coming on the market. Wanted was a 20- 
inch screen at a $300 to $350 cost. 

Videotown's first color milestone, how- 
ever, was last fall when the World Series 



COLOR INTEREST STIRS IN 
C & W'S VIDEOTOWN 

A LONG HARD LOOK at the exterior of a 
Videotown video household is taken by a 
Cunningham & Walsh researcher before ring- 
ing the doorbell and entering to ask the family 
about their viewing habits, their satisfaction 
with their present monochrome set or sets and 
their plans, if any, for the acquisition of a color 
receiver. On the basis of the reports of this 
and other C&W interviewers, Gerald W. 
Tasker, vice president and research director of 
the agency, concludes that color tv today is 
where black-and-white television was in 1949, 
just on the verge of transition from a novelty 
to a household necessity. Cunningham & Walsh 
is in a position to draw comparisons between 
now and then; it has been studying the effects 
of television on Videotown (New Brunswick, 
N. J.) for the past eight years. 




Page 32 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




C & W'S TASKER 



was telecast in color. C & W sent its re- 
searchers to New Brunswick to interview 
dealers on how much interest the series had 
stimulated in color buying. About half of 
the dealers had color sets for sale "but prac- 
tically no sales had been made." 

The dealers, themselves, "were still very 
bearish on the prospects," unenthusiastic 
about the quality of reception and "afraid 
of the high cost of repairs." But the dealers 
reported some interest was being stimulated 
among consumers by the increasing number 
of color telecasts. Color telecasts of the 
scries in bars excited interest. 

C & W Videotown surveyors revisited the 
dealers last April. This is what they found, 
according to Mr. Tasker: A total of 18 color 
sets was sold in the Videotown area. Eleven 
were in private homes; seven were in bars. 
Four were in the city proper, actually in 
bars, with the remainder in Videotown's 
surrounding small towns and out in the 
country. 

Who are the families with color in the 
Videotown area? Generally, they are in the 
older age groups, of middle or high income, 
and in executive or professional groups with 
a below average number of young children. 

Mr. Tasker notes that seven of the 1 1 
color set families had three tv sets in opera- 
tion. Three of the breadwinners in the 11 
families were electrical engineers with a 
smack of professional interest in color, and 
one was completely in the tv field. Three 
families had not seen color until their sets 
arrived. Of the remainder, the families were 
divided about equally in seeing their first 
colorcast at a bar or at a dealer. Every 
buyer, except one, had purchased the set 
late last year. 

These observations lead Mr. Tasker to 
emphasize the correlation between the trend 
of last spring with that of the 1949 interest 
in tv just when the medium was to begin a 
rapid development. He imparts this general 
statement from the April report: "The color 
set owners in Videotown testify to an in- 
creasing interest among their friends remi- 
niscent of the early days of television." 

The existence of color sets in bars at the 
early stage of color development recalls to 



Mr. Tasker's mind, the similar bar and grill 
use of black-and-white receivers in the early 
days of tv. But the agency researcher, after 
visiting all seven bars, found a difference: 
In April, the sets were being used as much 
or more for black-and-white telecasts than 
for color even when color was on the air. 
Bartenders told C & W's researchers that the 
clientele whetted their tv thirst on favorite 
detective stories or sports events rather than 
on spectaculars. One of the bartenders was 
ready to chuck the color receiver out. The 
fact that the World Series in color made such 
a hit in the bars bore out this desire to stick 
to familiar tavern programming — color or 
not. 

Next Videotown report will be made by 



Spot planning still in confer- 
ence stage, although Grove 
Labs, Vick Chemical and Mon- 
ticello Drug already are cast- 
ing about for availabilities. 

COLD REMEDY advertisers, traditionally 
heavy users of radio and television, last week 
were beginning to shape up plans for air sched- 
ules coinciding with the sniffle season next fall. 

A B«T check of some of the major advertisers 
in this category showed that, in the main, spot 
planning was still in the conference stage, al- 
though at least three sponsors — Grove Labs, 
Vick Chemical and Monticello Drug — were 
known to be casting about for spot availabilities. 

Preliminary estimates suggest a continued 
increase in the heavy use of the air media by 
the "cold" accounts, with traditional emphasis 
on spots and network participations. 

Client by client, current plans break down 
as follows: 

Grove Labs (Four Way cold tablets), St. 
Louis, will spend approximately $1.2 million 
in a campaign to be launched early in October. 
Grove will increase its budget about 10% over 
last year's outlay. The '56 schedule will include 
one-minutes, chain breaks and ID's on about 
150 television stations and early morning spots 
to be placed on nearly 200 radio stations. 
Contract will run from 20 to 26 weeks. Agency 
is Harry B. Cohen. New York. 

Anahist Co., Yonkers, N. Y., has not yet 
started to clear time, but it is understood that 
its agency. Ted Bates Inc., New York, has 
recommended a spot campaign this fall. Client 
approval of the recommendation is expected 
within the next 10 days. Last year Anahist em- 
ployed a television spot announcement schedule 
in about 100 markets and participations in sev- 
eral radio network shows. 

Musterole Co. (Musterole), Cleveland, 
through Erwin Wasey & Co., New York, nor- 
mally starts its fall buying about this time of 
the year. However, the business was sold re- 
cently to A. Plough Co., Memphis, with conse- 
quent indecision whether Wasey or Plough's 
own agency, Lake, Shapiro & Scott, Memphis, 
will handle the advertising. The issue is ex- 
pected to be resolved shortly, with Musterole's 
fall spending plans known by the end of July. 

Grove Labs (Bromo Quinine cold tablets). 
St. Louis, through Benton & Bowles, New York, 
is expected to develop its fall plans by next 
week. 

National Brands Div. of Sterling Drug 

(Bayer aspirin), New York, will continue its 
present radio and television spot campaign in 



C & W this fall, probably in September. Re- 
searchers now are preparing to invade New 
Brunswick to feel the tv pulse of set owners, 
dealers and others. What does Mr. Tasker 
feel about the new report? 

"All the evidence of price reductions, in- 
creased dealer activity, the growing schedule 
of color telecasts and the success of sales 
drives in various cities indicate that the hap- 
penings in Videotown are still typical of the 
country, and that ownership of color sets 
will increase rapidly." 

He adds: "We expect to find a marked 
increase in interest in color in this year's 
survey!" And as Videotown goes, he feels, 
so goes the nation. 



more than 100 markets on its regular 52-week 
contract. 

Pharmaceutical Inc. (Geritol), through Ed 
Kletter Assoc., New York, traditionally a late 
starter in its purchase of fall spots, once again 
will hold off action until late in August. 

Seeck & Kade Inc. (Pertussin), New York, 
through McCann-Erickson, New York, similarly 
will reserve action on its fall plans until the 
end of August when M. Kade, president of the 
firm, returns from a European trip. Last year 
Pertussin used spot announcements in 100 radio 
and about a dozen television markets. 

Luden's Inc. (Luden's cough drops), Reading, 
Pa., through J. M. Mathes, will start sponsor- 
ship of a quarter hour of Captain Kangaroo, 
Saturday mornings on CBS-TV. 

Monticello Drug (666 cold remedy), Jackson- 
ville, Fla., already is clearing availabilities 
through its agency, Charles B. Hoyt, in 200 
southern radio stations, starting Oct. 1 and 
running through March 1957 [B»T, June 25]. 

Vick Chemical Co. (cough syrup, inhalator, 
throat lozenges), through Morse International. 
New York, is planning to use approximately 15 
radio and 30 television markets for a 13-week 
fall campaign. 

Vick Chemical Co. (Vick Vaporub), New 
York, through BBDO, New York, is expected 
to make its fall plans definite by next week. 
A plans meeting at the agency will be held early 
this week. Vick probably will continue its par- 
ticipations on Mickey Mouse Club on ABC-TV. 

Campbell-Mithun Seeking 
Free Plugs for New Show 

CAMPBELL-MITHUN Inc., Minneapolis, is 
seeking free merchandising and promotion '"as- 
sistance" in the form of spot announcements 
from the 119 tv stations scheduled by Pillsbury 
Mills to carry its Stars of the Grand Ole Opry 
film series starting about Sept. 1. 

The promotional announcements have been 
requested by the agency to herald the start of 
the series, the possible personal appearances of 
the troupe in those markets and local contests 
next January or February. Solicitations for the 
plugs (minimums of 30 and 40), along with 
"any other assistance you can give us," have 
been mailed to all stations involved . in the 
estimated $500,000 gross sale deal negotiated 
by Pillsbury last May [B«T, May 28]. 

Arthur Lund, vice president and radio-tv di- 
rector of Campbell-Mithun, told B»T Thursday 
reaction to the requests has been "extremely 
good" and nearly complete. Most of the sta- 
tions are in smaller markets, he added. A 
similar project was conducted by Pillsbury 
last year, he said. 



COLD REMEDIES MAP FALL CAMPAIGNS 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 33 



TV MATERIAL IS PRE-TESTED 
BY NEW AGENCY EQUIPMENT 

• Three advertising firms set up individual methods: 

• N. W. Ayer establishes its own 'color laboratory' 

• Kenyon & Eckhardt develops portable testing machine 

• And BBDO purchases a closed circuit video system 



THREE top advertising agencies — N. W. Ayer 
& Son, Kenyon & Eckhardt and BBDO — are 
moving simultaneously although along some- 
what different paths in the direction of pre- 
testing tv material before programs and/or 
commercials are placed on the air. 

The three agencies reported last week on in- 
dividual activity and latest arrangements. In 
general these are: 

• N. W. Ayer (Philadelphia and New York) 
— establishment of a "color laboratory" to test 
color tv material and to train its people in 
using the medium. 

• Kenyon & Eckhardt, New York — develop- 



ment of a new device, a portable tv commercial 
testing machine, as an economical and quick 
way to pre-test tv commercials before they go 
on the air. 

• BBDO, New York — purchase of a closed 
circuit tv system for pre-studio testing and audi- 
tioning. 

Other radio-tv active agencies have been en- 
gaged in pre-testing. For example, J. Walter 
Thompson, New York, is a veteran in the pre- 
testing of commercials via its own facilities. 
Another agency, McCann-Erickson, currently 
is setting up its closed-circuit system for similar 
purposes. 



N. W. Ayer announced its contract with SRT 
Television Studios in New York will provide it 
with both black-and-white and color tv facilities. 
The agency will conduct a three-part program 
under the general supervision of Thomas H. 
Calhoun, head of tv programs and production. 
The agency estimates the tv equipment to be 
made available by SRT is worth $500,000. In- 
cluded is a new RCA live color camera chain. 

First part of the program will be made up of 
the testing of commercials, packaging and art 
materials before cameras and live auditions for 
talent, all directed by David M. Crandell, super- 
visor of tv production at Ayer. As explained 
by the agency, this phase will provide guidance 
on proper use of color to get a "natural and 
effective picture." 

Second phase will be a commercial color 
course for agency people under the direction of 
Donald S. Hillman, former NBC-TV producer- 
director and now a member of the agency's 
television directing staff. The course begins the 
middle of this month and will include lectures 
in Ayer's studio in New York (30 Rockefeller 
Plaza) by network executives, creative experts 
and speakers from commercial studios. Subjects 
to be covered include present and future devel- 



PLAYING THE ERRORS IN RATINGS 



By Jerome M. Sachs 

RATINGS and the resultant cost-per-thousand are the tools of 
our trade. But, like any other product of a sampling study, 
ratings are figures with a statistical error that can be calculated. 

Ignoring these errors, which are implicit in all survey results, 
has led to some remarkably silly behavior. When a rating falls 
from a 40 to a 35 there is a great demand for improvement. 
The difference between 40 and 35 may be of significance to a 
client agency, network or station. But, the apparent difference 
may not be a real one . . . the difference may be a statistical 
error. 

When a survey is taken and it is reported that 40% of all 
tv homes in an area viewed a given program, this does not mean 
precisely 40% ... it means approximately 40%. The range of 
this "approximately" — the upper and lower limits — is the calcu- 
lated statistical error. These limits are always expressed with an 
associated degree of reliability called the degree of confidence. 

The degree of confidence is expressed as a percent. For in- 
stance, 99.7% confidence tells us that if we repeated this survey 
the results would be within the established limits 99.7 times out 
of 100. Likewise, 95% confidence means that we should expect 
to be correct 95 times out of 100 ... 68% means 68 times out 
of 100. 

In terms of odds 99.7% confidence is like betting $369.40 to 
$1; 95% confidence is like betting 21 to 1 odds, 68% is a $2.15 
to $1 favorite. 

Now that we understand the meaning of statistical error and 
confidence limits, let's see what a rating really means. 

(It should be understood that the size of the sample in relation 
to the entire population does not affect its projectability. That 
is, a properly selected sample of 400 in New York with 4,439,- 
880 tv homes has the same projectability as does a properly 
selected sample of 300 in Portland, Ore., with 313,070 tv homes.) 

Let's take these two cites, New York and Portland, and ex- 
amine two extreme ratings in each market. In New York we 
will work with a 4.0 and a 40.0 on a sample base of 400 tv 
homes. In Portland we will work with the same 4.0 and 40.0 
on a sample base of 300 tv homes. 

The following tables show upper limits and lower limits for 
two sample sizes with varying degrees of confidence. Remember 
the upper limits are the highest extremity of the "approxi- 



mately"; the lower limits are the lowest extremity of the 
proximately." 

TABLE I 



ap- 



UPPER AND LOWER LIMITS 



City 

Portland 
New York 
Portland 
New York 



City 
Portland 
New York 
Portland 
New York 



City 
Portland 
New York 
Portland 
New York 



Sample Size 
300 
400 
300 
400 



Sample Size 
300 
400 
300 
400 



Sample Size 
300 
400 
400 
400 



99.7% Confidence 
Rating 
4.0 
4.0 
40.0 
40.0 



Upper Limits 

7.4 

6.9 
48.5 
47.4 



TABLE II 
UPPER AND LOWER LIMITS 



95% Confidence 
Rating 
4.0 
4.0 
40.0 
40.0 



Upper Limits 

6.3 

6.0 
45.7 
45.0 



TABLE III 
UPPER AND LOWER LIMITS 

68% Confidence 
Rating 
4.0 
4.0 
40.0 
40.0 

charts 



Upper Limits 

5.T 
5.0 
42.8 
42.5 



Lower Limits 

0.6 

1.1 
31.5 
32.7 



Lower Limits 

1.7 

2.0 
34.3 
35.0 



Lower Limits 

2.9 

3.0 
37.2 
37.5 



these 



let's 



examine even the more 
. . let's see what a 40.0 



On the basis of 
closely the meaning of approximately 
rating really means. 

On a sample base of 400 a 40.0 rating is somewhere between: 



99.7% 
Confidence 

47.4 
32.7 



95% 
Confidence 

45.0 
35.0 



68% 
Confidence 

42.5 
37.5 



It becomes apparent that as the degree of confidence is in- 
creased so is the range in which the rating might fall. Although 
68% confidence gives us the narrowest limits it affords too little 
confidence . . . 99.7% is best but the limits are far too great. 
We will therefore use 95% confidence limits, since this certainly 
gives a high enough degree of confidence and still keeps a rela- 
tively narrow range. 

Translated into cost-per-thousand this means that in New York 
a Class "AAA" spot with a 40.0 rating that cost $2,050 has a 
cost-per-thousand of $1.15. With 95% confidence this $1.15 
means somewhere between $1.03 and $1.32. 

In Portland, Ore., a Class "AAA" spot with a 40.0 rating that 
cost $200 has a cost-per-thousand of $1.60. With 95% con- 
fidence his $1.60 means somewhere between $1.40 and $1.86. 

Assuming that we could get 4.0 rating at one tenth the cost of 



Page 34 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



opment of color programming, audience for 
color telecasts, cost and budgeting, technical and 
engineering developments, uses of live produc- 
tion, film and slides, and problems of design, 
art work, makeup and wardrobe in preparing 
material for color tv. Supplementing the lec- 
tures will be workshop sessions at SRT's studios. 
The agency said the lectures and question-and- 
answer periods would be recorded, then edited 
and compiled in a printed report for Ayer and 
its clients. 

A coaxial cable will be installed between 
SRT's studios and the Ayer office in New York 
to permit closed-circuit testing of material. This 
latter facility makes up the third phase of the 
program. 

In announcing Ayer's move, James E. Hanna, 
vice president in charge of the agency's radio-tv 
department, cited the "growing importance of 
color as well as black-and-white tv" in the ad- 
vertising plans of the agency's clients. Said Mr. 
Hanna: "The investments which clients make in 
television are so great that we believe it is vital 
to pre-test many types of material quickly and 
carefully before putting it on the air. Color will 
bring new problems, and these cannot be solved 
properly at desks, drawing boards or around a 



conference table. 

"These can only be solved by actual work 
before a color camera and study of the results 
on a receiving set. In the past, such testing 
could only be done occasionally, by courtesy cf 
the networks or stations equipped to transmit 
color. The arrangement with SRT Television 
Studios puts testing on a regular, businesslike 
basis." 

Simply described, K&E's new testing device — 
shaped like a large automatic coffee vending 
machine — contains a continuous recording 
mechanism which registers the viewer's reac- 
tions to a tv commercial before actual showing 
to the public. The reactions permit the tv pro- 
ducer to evaluate the commercial's efficiency. 

As invented by K&E's senior vice president 
in charge of marketing services, G. Maxwell 
Ule, the machine, for which a patent has been 
applied, has a rear-view projector that throws 
a filmed commercial onto a screen at eye-level. 
The viewer records his reactions to the com- 
mercial at the moment he sees and hears it by 
an adjustable lever. If the viewer likes the com- 
mercial, he moves the lever to the right; if he 
dislikes it, the lever is moved to the left — the 



more intense the reaction, the farther he moves 
the lever. 

According to K&E, the machine will be made 
available to clients and can be set up at super- 
markets, department stores and other "high 
traffic" areas for more typical test audiences. 
Reactions are recorded on a tape that can be 
analyzed. 

The machine is on view — and will be through 
August — as a feature of a special Ford Motor 
Co. (a K&E client) testing exhibit at Grand 
Central Station in New York, a display of vari- 
ous electronic devices being put to use by the 
auto maker. 

Mr. Ule told B«T the machine "helps us 
overcome the language problem. Language is 
the biggest barrier in communications. People 
simply cannot express themselves audibly. They 
can't tell you outright whether they like some- 
thing or not. Now they can tell us in a non- 
verbal way." Mr. Ule, who had been thinking 
of such a testing device over the past 10 years, 
developed it especially for K&E, explaining, it 
"reflects" the viewpoint of the agency "we are 
trying to build. . . . Build a better gadget, you 



the 40.0 rating we would assume the cost-per-thousands to be 
equal. But this is how it works out. 



TABLE IV 
UPPER AND LOWER LIMITS 



Market 

New York 

Portland, Ore. 



Rating 

40.0 

4.0 
40.0 

4.0 



Cost 

$2,050. 

205. 
$ 200. 
20. 



CPM 

$1.15 
1.15 
1.60 
1.60 



Upper 
Limit CPM 

$1.32 
2.31 
1.86 
3.76 



Lower 
Limit CPM 

$1.03 
.77 
1.40 
1.01 



Now which is the better buy . . . the 4.0 rating for $20 or the 
40.0 rating for $200? 

Note that the 4.0 rating may vary by as much as 50% . . . the 
40.0 rating may vary by as much as 12.5%. (The higher the 
rating the lower the percent of variance. Conversely, the lower 
the rating the higher the percent of variance.) 

Thus far we have discussed rating and the resultant cost-per- 
thousand in only two markets. But the cost-per-thousand varies 
market to market depending of course on the cost-per-spot in 
relation to the number of tv homes in the coverage area in rela- 
tion to the ratings possible. 

cpM== Cost Per Spot 

Thousands of Tv Homes In Area x rating % 

By virtue of stations not always scaling their prices in relation 
to the number of tv homes covered, the cost-per-thousand has 
a built-in bias. For instance, $200 could buy one "AAA" spot 
in Indianapolis with 597,130 tv homes. The same $200 buys one 
"AAA" spot in Portland with only 313,070 tv homes. Portland 
has an inherent cost-per-thousand of almost twice Indianapolis. 

To illustrate this point we have selected 38 markets and have 
arranged them in descending order of tv homes. We took the 



JEROME M. SACHS is a time- 
buyer with Doyle Dane Bernbach, 
New York, on the Max Factor 
and Gallo Wine accounts. He 
started in the agency field some 
11 years ago with J. D. Tarcher 
& Co., New York. After a five- 
year hitch there, he went into 
the Army for two years. Return- 
ing to civilian life, he joined Cecil 
& Presbrey, and later was asso- 
ciated with Franklin Bruck Adv. 
before moving to Doyle Dane 
Bernbach six months ago. 




highest one-time Class "AAA" rate in each market. To illustrate 
the rating possible we selected the rating of the # 1 5th ranking 
show in each market, and then calculated the cost-per-thousand. 



TABLE V 

Highest 





lx Rate 


Rating 








Class 


of 15th 






No. Tv 


"AAA" 


Show in 


Homes 




Homes 


Spot 


Market 


Reached 


CPM 


4,439,880 


2,050 


26.4 


1,172,130 


$1.75 


2,072,600 


750 


27.5 


569,970 


1.32 


1,982,430 


650 


27.5 


569,970 


1.32 


1,713,600 


650 


26.0 


445,540 


1.46 


1,373,760 


550 


25.7 


353,060 


1.56 


1,131,760 


500 


31.0 


350,850 


1.43 


1,123,170 


300 


28.7 


322,350 


.93 


1,020,280 


400 


47.3 


482,590 


.83 


753,570 


330 


30.2 


227,580 


1.45 


630,400 


300 


26.2 


165,160 


1.82 


597,130 


200 


36.8 


219,740 


.91 


592,820 


350 


24.4 


144,650 


2.42 


590,460 


330 


28.2 


166,510 


1.98 


542,090 


200 


27.0 


146,360 


1.37 


540,390 


225 


25.0 


135,100 


1.67 


500,100 


190 


35.3 


176,540 


1.08 


470,350 


175 


37.8 


177,790 


.98 


461,730 


190 


46.5 


214,700 


.88 


445,030 


220 


27.9 


124,163 


1.77 


430,990 


190 


25.0 


107,750 


1.76 


371,330 


200 


35.9 


133,300 


1.50 


358,740 


225 


42.6 


152,820 


1.48 


356,840 


130 


30.8 


109,900 


1.18 


313,070 


200 


31.0 


97,050 


2.06 


305,460 


180 


26.7 


81,560 


2.21 


304,150 


225 


48.0 


145,990 


1.54 


290,680 


180 


40.3 


117,144 


1.54 


290,190 


225 


31.2 


90,540 


2.49 


287,820 


160 


32.5 


93,540 


1.71 


286,275 


175 


31.5 


90,180 


1.94 


283,520 


200 


35.0 


99,230 


2.01 


259,150 


150 


25.8 


66,860 


2.24 


221,630 


170 


34.2 


75,800 


2.24 


213,605 


140 


32.5 


69,420 


2.02 


169,150 


150 


29.7 


50,240 


2.99 


168,690 


125 


30.4 


51,280 


2.44 


146,330 


137.50 


33.0 


48,290 


2.85 


91,360 


65 


38.8 


35,450 


1.83 



Rank City 

1. New York 

2. Chicago 

3. Los Angeles 

4. Philadelphia 

5. Detroit 

6. Boston 

7. San Francisco 

8. Pittsburgh 

9. St. Louis 

10. Milwaukee 

11. Indianapolis 

12. Washington, D. C. 

13. Minneapolis-St. Paul 

14. Atlanta 

15. Dallas-Ft. Worth 

16. Louisville 

17. Dayton 

18. Schenectady 

19. Houston-Galveston 

20. Seattle-Tacoma 

21. Syracuse 

22. Toledo 

23. Sacramento 

24. Portland, Ore. 

25. San Diego 

26. Miami 

27. Jacksonville 

28. Oklahoma City 

29. Rochester 

30. Tulsa 

31. Omaha 

32. Denver 

33. San Antonio 

34. Richmond 

35. Salt Lake City 

36. Tampa-St. Petersburg 

37. Spokane 

38. Duluth-Superior 

Notice the range in the cost-per-thousand. Pittsburgh (#8) 
comes up with 83 cents cost-per-thousand. Salt Lake City (#35) 
shows a cost-per-thousand of $2.99. Notice, too, that the higher 
cost-per-thousands seems to appear in the smaller markets. 

This is by no means the end of the story. We have dealt only 
with individual spot ratings and their costs-per-thousand. Other 
problems arise when ratings are added to yield total rating points 
per station or market. And, too there are the problems of au- 
dience duplication and frequency. 

What we have hoped to do is: 

(1) Point out that ratings are certainly a useful barometer 
of program popularity. But we must always keep the 
plus and minus of our confidence intervals in mind. 

(2) Cost-per-thousands are an excellent index of spot ef- 
ficiency. But we must beware of comparing cost-per- 
thousands with built-in-bias. Only cost-per-thousands 
within the same market are comparable. 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 



Page 35 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 




A COLOR LABORATORY for regular testing of television material 
and training of staff members has been set up by N. W. Ayer & 
Son through a contract signed with SRT Television Studios in 
New York. In the color control room watching a test are (I to r) 
David M. Crandell, Ayer supervisor of tv production; SRT President 
John F. Gilbert; Donald S. Hillman, an Ayer tv director, and 
Norman P. Tate, head of art for the agency. The laboratory also 
will be used for black-and-white television. 




A PORTABLE tv commercial testing machine has been developed 
by Kenyon & Eckhardt. The machine contains a continuous re- 
cording mechanism which registers the viewer's reaction to a tv 
commercial before it actually is shown to the public. Here Laura 
Riordan "talks back" to a commercial on the machine at a 
Ford Motor Co. exhibit in New York City, and G. H. England, 
Ford's director of consumer research, watches the machine reg- 
ister her reaction. 



get a better team, and consequently, better 
advertising." 

The machine, hand-manufactured for $2,500, 
has a patent pending in Mr. Ule's name, and 
should a sufficient number of agencies express 
a collective interest in it, Mr. Ule said, "we 
may make it available to other shops, in time." 
Present plans, however, call for its exclusive 
use by K&E and its clients. It is designed to 
handle one commercial on a continuous basis 
("we'd be defeating the premise of individual 
attention on one given commercial if we'd run 
a string of spots," Mr. Ule said) which will be 
changed after three days, and is adaptable for 
either black-and-white or color film. 

K&E notes that once viewers' reactions are 
analyzed by the agency's research department, 
producers can then determine what segments 
of the commercial create interest and accept- 
ance; learn what "creates positive and negative 
reactions," and decide which to eliminate from 
the commercial. 

Supplementary Questionnaire 

Mr. Ule also suggested that even though the 
machine seems to provide accurate reflection of 
viewers' reactions to a commercial, a supple- 
mentary questionnaire is desirable to get at the 
reasons in back of the reactions. To date, more 
than 1,000 persons have given their reactions to 
the machine in a three-months testing period at 
the Jersey Tire Co., appliance store in Plainfield, 
N. J., and at Quackenbush department store at 
Paterson, N. J. 

In these tests, a questionnaire asked the view- 
er who had manipulated the machine's lever, 
what the commercial showed and told about the 
product; whether he rated it "better, poorer or 
on an average" with other commercials and why; 
whether he remembered the brand name; what 
specific parts of the commercial he liked or 
disliked; whether he planned to buy the prod- 
uct as a result of the commercial, and what 
were his past buying habits concerning the 
particular product. 

The new closed-circuit tv system acquired by 
BBDO was purchased from General Precision 
Lab, Pleasantville, New York. 

According to Robert Foreman, BBDO's vice 



president and director for radio and television, 
the equipment will provide for pre-studio test- 
ing and auditioning. 

Mr. Foreman said BBDO will use the equip- 
ment for "preliminary checks" on art work, 
photographs and package designs to see how 
these items register on black-and-white tv. Ac- 
cording to Mr. Foreman, the new system is "a 
logical part of the agency's tv equipment." 

Models and actors will be auditioned to test 
them for their "tv looks" via the system, Mr. 
Foreman added. 

Slater Promoted to V. P. 

GEORGE A. SLATER, senior vice president, 
Mullay & Nichols, New York, has been ap- 
pointed to the newly created post of executive 
vice president, it was announced last week. Mr. 
Slater will be responsible for account servicing 
and will share management responsibilities with 
John P. Kelley, president. Mr. Slater has been 
with the agency since 1938 and before that had 
been associated with Ralph J. Jones agency, 
Cincinnati. 



Timely Article 

THE CRASH between Trans-World-Air- 
lines and United Airlines planes produced 
a concentrated three-day spot campaign 
by Reader's Digest, calling attention to 
an article in the July issue of the maga- 
zine on traffic jams in the air. Walter 
Weintz, circulation director of Reader's 
Digest, said that as soon as he heard de- 
tails of the tragedy, he ordered a spot 
radio campaign on CBS Radio stations 
in New York, Washington, Los Angeles, 
San Francisco and Chicago, using 10 an- 
nouncements last Monday and five on 
Tuesday and Wednesday. He added that 
Reader's Digest earlier had produced a 
five-minute free film on the subject of 
traffic jams in the air, which "several 
hundred" tv stations have been using. 



S. F. BREWERY BUYS 
PRO GRID SLATES 

SAN FRANCISCO BREWING Co. (Burger- 
meister beer) plans a one-half million dollar 
radio-tv professional football budget this fall, 
it was announced Thursday by President Henry 
E. Picard, with purchase on Don Lee Broad- 
casting System of all 18 games of the Los 
Angeles Rams and all 18 games of the San 
Francisco Forty Niners. Radio coverage also 
includes International Network, Arizona Broad- 
casting System and several stations in Alaska 
and Hawaii. 

Burgermeister also has purchased CBS-TV's 
professional football package in Los Angeles 
and San Diego, consisting mostly of Rams 
games. Burgermeister had sponsored both the 
Rams and Forty Niners last season on ABC-TV 
in more than one dozen western markets but 
the CBS-TV package this year precludes that 
coverage. Instead, Burgermeister is doubling 
its normal complement of spots in other tv 
markets in addition to football budget which 
includes heavy radio-tv spot promotion sched- 
ule. The radio schedule starts Aug. 11 with an 
exhibition game. Burgermeister places through 
BBDO, San Francisco. 

Brewery Expands Potter Show 
To 15 More Western Markets 

REGAL Pale Brewing Co., San Francisco, 
through Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli there, plans 
sponsorship of a weekly half-hour kinescope 
version of its full-hour Peter Potter Juke Box 
Jury on KRCA (TV) Los Angeles in 15 other 
western markets including Alaska and Hawaii 
effective July 20. Program package may be ex- 
panded to midwestern and eastern markets also, 
KRCA reported. 

To avoid payment of 5% royalty to the 
AFM Music Performance Trust Fund, the kine- 
scope portion will not use live music, but 
recordings put to the jury will be sent to indi- 
vidual stations in advance for synchronized play- 
back with kinescope. Peter Potter, disc jockey on 



Page 36 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



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RANGE RIDER 

Popular western series starring 
Jack Mahoney and Dick Jones 
who perform daring stunts en- 
route to disposing of their ene- 
mies. Tuesday through Friday 
from 6:00 to 6:30 P.M. 





7 O'CLOCK FINAL INNER SANCTUM 

Masterful portrayals by a host of 
accomplished television person- 
alities make these psychological 
dramas top mystery thrillers. 
Monday through Friday from 
11:20 to 11:50 P.M. 



David Stickle presents thorough, 
fact-filled summaries of major 
international, national, and 
Maryland news augmented by 
newsfilm. Monday through Fri- 
day from 7:00 to 7:10 P.M. 



On Maximum Power— Televising Color 



WMARsTV 



CHANNEL 2 SUNPAPERS TELEVISION BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



Telephone MUlberry 5-5670 ★ TELEVISION AFFILIATE OF THE COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. New York, Detroit, Kansas City, Son Francisco, Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas, Los Angele* 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 37 






WISC-TV Channel 3 VHF offers you a 
rich area market! It includes the cream of 
America's Dairyland, the home of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, Wisconsin's Capital 
City of Madison, a northern section of 
^^agricultural Illinois. It is an area of diversi- 
fied industry— a leading medical center. 

.300,170 (1956) 

Total Families 409,800 (1956) 

Total Population 1,389,100 (1956) 

^ m Total Retail Sales $ 1 ,68 1 , 1 47,000 ( 1 955) 

County Coverage 30 (Wise, III., Iowa) 

Power 100,000 Watts 

Antenna Height 1826 Ft. A.S.L. 

/ 

'•b 0ro m / m\ i / ~7 - # c I 

^VO/V / m 1 / / K m E F<-n dd „ 

W / ——/___ m\ C^tri^ i_J3~~n lok<> I O Ay o D lTH^M 

7 7 m_ 4^ ' — 7 — L — __sj2^^^ w 
/ — ■ T^^H^r — / /^s^H 

/ / ^^Br m I //v G r 

Sr-' //ff /d^^ e m«o ISOn f7T—z / r 

■MT / Fr *epor, / *°ckf orcJ /< v_ 

<**o LL / x 7 co " s/ " V^X y 




Represented Nationally by 

PETERS, GRIFFON, WOODWARD, INC. 



OH AM M 



l<VHF 

MADISON, WISCONSI N 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



KLAC Los Angeles since inception of the 
KLAC "Big Five" programming format several 
years ago, will retain only his Saturday and 
Sunday featured spot on the radio station. 
Meanwhile, KLAC has named Bill Silbert, 
formerly on WMGM New York, as disc jockey 
to replace Mr. Potter weekdays. Mr. Silbert 
changes his air name to Bill Bradley. He has 
signed a five-year local radio contract with 
KLAC. 

Last Biow Accounts Signed 

THE last of the former Biow Co. accounts 
found a new agency last week, when Julius 
Wile Sons & Co. (imported liqueurs) and See- 
man Bros. Inc. (White Rose tea and other 
foods), both New York, appointed Anderson & 
Cairns, New York, as their agency. 

Wile, Seeman and the Benrus watch accounts 
were all serviced over a period of 25 years by 
Jack Tarcher, now senior vice president and 
account supervisor of Lennen & Newell. After 
Mr. Tarcher dissolved his agency, the three 
accounts accompanied him to Cecil & Presbrey 
and Biow, now both defunct. C&P folded in 
November 1954, Biow last month. Mr. Tarcher 
resigned Wile and Seeman before joining Len- 
nen & Newell with Benrus this past spring be- 
cause of "product conflict." The two accounts 
will continue to be serviced by Ed Ridley, 
account executive at C&P and Biow on the 
two accounts and who had been with Mr. 
Tarcher for the past 15 years. 

ARB Releases Ad Study 

ADVERTISING Research Foundation last 
week issued Vols. II and III of its Printed 
Advertising Ratings Method study, giving in 
Vol. II advertising ratings obtained by the 
aided recall, recognition and reader interest 
methods, and in Vol. Ill the advertisements 
studied with the ratings for each. 

Vol. I, issued previously, presented informa- 
tion on the number and per cent of people 
claiming to have read the May 16, 1955, issue 
of Life magazine, used as the guinea pig for 
the study. The three volumes, containing more 
than 600 pages and nearly 60,000 figures, rep- 
resent more than $100,000 in research and 
comprise ARF's biggest survey to date, involv- 
ing more than 12,000 interviews. Non-sub- 
subscribers can obtain sets of the three-volume 
report at $500 per set. 

Series Reverts to Color 

NBC-TV's Kraft Television Theatre, now in its 
ninth year and one of the first tv dramatic hour- 
long programs, initiated colorcasting with 
last Wednesday's show. Current plans call for 
the series to be continued live and in color 
through Sept. 5, although the network has indi- 
cated the color schedule may be extended into 
the 1956-57 season. Kraft Foods Co.'s agency, 
J. Walter Thompson Co., as well as NBC-TV, 
pointed out that at least on last Wednesday's 
show, and possibly on others, commercials 
would be in monochrome. 

Sewing Products Drive Set 

ABC-TV's Afternoon Film Festival has been 
chosen by Coats & Clark Sales Corp., New 
York, to promote its threads, zippers and 
needlework products this fall. Participations 
will be used on other tv shows in markets not 
covered by ABC, with the company hoping 
to reach 85% of the nation's tv homes. Kenyon 
& Eckhardt, New York, is Coats & Clark's 
agency. 



ADVERTEST TV TESTIMONIAL- 
BEST FOR SELLING NEW CARS 

Survey for NBC backs results determined in two earlier studies. Tel- 
evision leads all other media as top automobile saleman in every 
question asked, and dealers prefer that type of advertising. 



ADDITIONAL ammunition is being fired this 
week in support of television as the most ef- 
fective advertising medium for automobile sales 
among auto dealers and prospective buyers. 

This latest testimonial for television is under- 
lined in a survey conducted for NBC by Ad- 
vertest Research, New Burnswick, N. J. 
[Closed Circuit, July 2]. In the main, it sub- 
stantiates conclusions reached in recent studies 
conducted separately by ABC-TV and televi- 
sion Bureau of Adv. [B«T, July 2] on televi- 
sion as an advertising medium for automobile 
sales. Highlights of the survey, to be released 
by NBC today (Monday): 

• Television has "a stronger impact on auto- 
mobile dealers and prospects than any other 
medium." 

• Dealers say tv is the most preferred na- 



dealers and 335 customers in dealers' show- 
rooms, according to Mr. Beville. Cities covered 
were Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, 
Cleveland, Columbus, Minneapolis, Nashville, 
New York and St. Louis. On many questions, 
respondents gave multiple choices. 

Highpoints of the dealers' phase of the 
survey: 

Television was listed by 59% of the dealers 
as the medium they believed most effective in 
getting people to visit their showrooms, fol- 
lowed by newspapers, 43%; magazines, 12%; 
all others, 15%; none, 6%. Television again 
was favored by dealers for pre-selling prospects, 
with a total of 59%; newspapers, 36%; maga- 
zines, 21%; all others, 9%; none, 12%. In 
another question, asking dealers which medium 
a certain auto manufacturer should put most" 




What Sent 




Where Dealers 




New Car 




Report Seeing 




Shoppers 




Automobile 




To Showrooms 




Advertising 




Television 


50% 


Television 


84% 


Newspapers . . . 


.16 


Magazines 


73 


Magazines 


13 


Newspapers . . . 


.69 


Radio 


2 


Radio 


30 


Other 


5 


Billboards 


10 


None 


18 


Other 


4 



tional medium in getting people to visit show 
rooms; is the most effective medium in pre- 
selling the prospect and making the dealer's job 
easier; is the one type of advertising most 
strongly recommended above all other media, 
and is the one in which manufacturers should 
increase their budgets. 

• New car prospects say that tv advertising 
"stands out most strongly in their minds," and 
that tv, above all other media, does the most in 
inducing them to look at a particular make of 
automobile. 

Hugh Beville Jr.. vice president in charge of 
planning and development for NBC, revealed 
that the survey was shown last week to leaders 
of the automobile industry in Detroit. Mr. 
Beville reported that the survey, designed to 
provide indications of the comparative effec- 
tiveness for automobile advertising of the 
major national advertising media, was con- 
ducted by Advertest under the supervision of 
Dr. Thomas E. Coffin, manager of research 
for NBC. 

The field research, he said, was carried out 
by Advertest during June 2-5 in 10 major cities 
in the eastern half of the U. S., and included 
dealers and customers of all "Big Three" makes 
(General Motors, Ford and Chrysler) in propor- 
tion to their share of recent passenger car sales. 
Personal interviews were conducted with 128 



of its money into, television again led by 59%; 
newspapers, 38%; magazines, 10%; all others, 
4%; none, 12%. 

Highlights of the consumer part of the 
survey: 

Television scored highest of all media (71%) 
on a question which asked new-car prospects 
to remember the advertising itself and via 
which medium for a particular car make. 
Trailing were magazines, 42%; newspapers, 
40%; all others, 29%; none, 4%. 

Asked which kind of advertising stands out 
"most strongly in your mind," 61% of new-car 
prospects cited television; 22%, magazines; 
17%, newspapers; 10%, all others; none, 3%. 
Queried as to which kind of advertising did the 
most to get the prospect interested in looking 
at a particular make, television led with 50%; 
newspapers, 16%; magazines, 13%; all others, 
7%; none, 18% (see chart above). 

Mr. Beville reported that other conclusions 
reached by the survey were that, although more 
of the automotive advertising budget goes into 
newspapers, the dealers personally notice tv 
advertising more than print advertising for 
their makes and 72% of the dealers interviewed 
felt that tv seems to cause more word-of-mouth 
comment among customers and prospects than 
any other medium. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 39 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



GOING PLACES . . . AND , . , DOING THINGS 



NBC RADIO'S Monitor likes "going places 
. . . and . . . doing things." So does, it 
would appear, American Motors Corp.'s 
Rambler Cross-Country, a six-passenger sta- 
tion wagon which a week and a half ago 
bid fair to smash previously-held stock car 
economy runs when it racked up the 
2,961.42 miles between Los Angeles and 
New York on 92.27 gallons of gas — less 
than five tankfuls at $26.17. 

Expecting this to happen, it seemed only 
logical to American Motors and Geyer Adv. 
New York and Detroit officials that Moni- 
tor should report the running of this econ- 
omy drive to the weekend listener as news 
and as a matter of interest to the week- 
ender who is, after all, a hot sales prospect 
for the Nash Rambler. 

Producer Al Capstaff of Monitor was ap- 
proached with the idea of covering the 
economy run as an editorial feature. 
Geyer's radio-tv director Ray Mauer re- 
ceived, in turn, a total of 20 precious week- 
end minutes, splitting them on a 50-50 basis 
between June 23-24, each segment averaging 
four minutes. No sooner had Monitor sales 
staff caught word of the coverage than 
Geyer ended by buying $6,000 worth of 
commercial time adjacent to the editorial 
features. In addition, Geyer scheduled 
filmed reports of the run on its regular 
Wednesday night Disneyland on ABC-TV, 
for June 20 and June 27 showing. 

Geyer dispatched Detroit tv director Ed 
Rodgers to Los Angeles to supervise filming 
of the June 19 departure, rushed negatives 
through a local film lab and set copywriter 
Jim DeFoe to produce a 90-second com- 
mercial for the next night's Disneyland. 
Then, radio-tv production supervisor Lee 
Emmerich left New York for pre-determined 
locales through which the Rambler was 
scheduled to pass, aided American Motors 
P. R. people in coordinating local-radio-tv- 
press coverage and by the time Monitor went 
on the air, telephoned running commen- 
taries to Mr. Mauer, who was standing by 
at NBC's Radio Central in New York, 
ready to edit tapes and place them on the 
air. Finally, film producer Jim Harkey 
rushed his camera crew to a place in down- 



town Manhattan, ready to flag in the 
Rambler at the finish line, the morning of 
June 25th. 

"Our primary aim," said Mr. Mauer, "was 
to time the running in as close a fashion to 
a news event of the utmost importance. We 
were frankly surprised at the public's re- 
action to this thing. Why, in Columbus 
alone, they were lined up in the streets as if 
a visting general was passing by." 

Mr. Mauer emphasized Geyer used no 
stunts. The Rambler's gas tank, continually 
serviced (through a separate promotional tie- 
in) by Tidewater Oil Co.'s Tydol Flying "A" 
stations in 13 states, was locked immediately 
upon filling by an official of the National 
Assn. of Stock Car Racing, and when it 
came time to halt overnight after a grueling 
13 hours on the road, NASCAR impounded 
the car to prevent tinkering with the carbu- 
retor or gas gauge. No move was made in 
routing the run to avoid normal weekend 
traffic jams or large metropolian area con- 
gestions in such cities as St. Louis and Indi- 
anapolis. A Nash official pointed out that 
the experiment was just that. "Neither we 
nor the Monitor people knew whether 
we'd make it past all the checkpoints," he 
said. 

All commercials placed next to the Moni- 
tor news coverage were keyed to the actual 
running, causing such a local reaction that 
American Motors dealers along the way re- 
ported a sudden increase in showroom traf- 
fic. Said one dealer: "One person admitted 

to me she was all set to buy a until she 

heard of the Rambler's gas consumption on 
Monitor. Imagine — 32.09 miles per gallon on 
overdrive." Added Mr. Emmerich, reporting 
on that motor-happy city, "they loved us 
in Indianapolis!" 

So successful was the reaction to the re- 
port via Monitor, Mr. Mauer reported last 
week, that American Motors bought more 
time segments on NBC the following week- 
end. It'll be sometime before AMC lets 
up on the broadcast accelerator. On the 
planning board now: an intensive, all-media 
campaign on the fact that the Rambler 
Cross-Country really went places . . . doing 
big things. 



Pillsbury Orders 'Mickey 7 

PILLSBURY MILLS Inc., through Leo Burnett 
Co., Chicago, has placed an order for 
26 matching quarter hours of ABC- TV's 
Mickey Mouse Club this fall. Through the net- 
work's central division, Pillsbury will sponsor 
the 5:15-30 p.m. (EDT) segment on alternate 
Thursdays, probably starting Oct. 1, on behalf 
of its various baking mixes. Renewal orders 
by other sponsors for Mickey Mouse Club seg- 
ments — reportedly Miles Labs and Minnesota 
Mining & Mfg. Co. — also are understood to be 
imminent. 

Tootsies Sponsor Parade 

FOR THE second year, The Sweets Co. of 
America (Tootsie Roll candy bars) will be a 
sponsor of Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade 
from New York on NBC-TV (Nov. 22, 11 
a.m.- 12 noon EST). Ideal Toy Corp. had 
signed earlier as a sponsor of the parade. 

AGENCY APPOINTMENTS 

Robert A. Johnston Co., Milwaukee, appoints 
J. Walter Thompson Co., Chicago, to handle 
advertising for biscuit, candy-confectionery, 
and chocolate-cocoa divisions, effective Aug. 1. 

Fieldcrest Mills (textiles) N. Y., names J. Walter 
Thompson, N. Y., for its domestics division, 
effective Oct. 1. 

Knapp-Monarch Co., St. Louis electric appli- 
ance manufacturer and recent purchaser of 
Nesco, to Frank Block Assoc., St. Louis. 

American Motor Hotel Assn., Kansas City, 
Mo., names Jackson, Haerr, Peterson & Hall 
Inc. for special promotions. Agency handled 
special promotions for client during year 
ended Nov. 1955. 

SPOT NEW BUSINESS 

American Pencil Co., N. Y., launching pre- 
Christmas spot tv drive for Venus Paradise 
coloring set in New York, Boston, Cincin- 
nati, Chicago and Los Angeles, starting mid- 
September and ending close to Christmas. 
Agency: Doyle Dane Bernbach, N. Y. 

Parents Magazine, N. Y., planning spot tele- 
vision campaign after Labor Day to promote 
sale of two Parents monthly publications — 
Humpty Dumpty for children 3 to 7 and Chil- 
dren's Digest for those 5 to 12. Number of 
markets still undetermined but David Altman 
Adv., N. Y., specialists in book advertising, un- 
derstood looking for availabilities on children's 
and women's programs. 

NETWORK NEW BUSINESS 

Horpoint Co., Chicago, will sponsor schedule 
of 150 five-minute news segments on NBC's 
Monitor weekend radio service, marking Hot- 
point's first participation on Monitor, starting 
Sept. 8. Agency: Needham, Louis & Brorby, 
Chicago. 

ABC-TV reports new sponsors for Afternoon 
Film Festival (Mon.-Fri.) include Norwich 
Pharmacal (Ungentine), through Benton & 
Bowles, N. Y., for undetermined length, 31 
participations, beginning today (Mon.); Thomas 
J. Lipton Inc. (soups), via Young & Rubicam, 
N. Y., three participations per week for five 
weeks, beginning Oct. 3, Exquisite Form Bras- 
siere Inc., through Grey Adv., three partici- 
pations per week for 13 weeks, starting Sept. 
10. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



| 




THE Rambler Cross-Country crosses the finish line in Manhattan after averaging 32.09 
miles per gallon on its Los Angeles-New York economy run. 



Page 40 • July 9, 1956 



OF ALL THE MEDIA IN PHILADELPHIA 



12 Radio Stations 




3 Newspapers 



4 TV Stations 



KINGS BURGUNDY WINE... A NEW PRODUCT 



USED ONLY 





32.8% 



of the people in Philadelphia 
actually identified their commercial 





dial 
950 



The Station Of 
Personalities 



Represented nationally by Gill-Perna, Inc. 

New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 41 









1 

from Texans in the state's Two 
for your help in making June 

TO THE RADIO-TELEVISION 

Television 



NORTH 

KRLD-TV 

WFAA-TV 

WBAP-TV 

KFJZ-TV 

KLTV-TV 

SOUTH 

KFDM-TV 
KGUL-TV 
KPRC-TV 
KUHT-TV 



TEXAS AREA 

Dallas 
Dallas 
Ft. Worth 
Ft. Worth 
Tyler 

TEXAS AREA 

Beaumont 
Galveston 
Houston 
Houston 



MID-TEXAS AREA 

KTBC-TV Austin 
KCEN-TV Temple 
KWTX-TV Waco 

SAN ANTONIO AREA 

KCOR-TV San Antonio 

KENS-TV San Antonio 

WOAI-TV San Antonio 

COASTAL BEND AREA 

KVDO-TV Corpus Christi 

KRIS-TV Corpus Christi 



Radio 



NORTH 


TEXAS AREA 


KBUD 


Athens 


KALT 


Atlanta 


KFYN 


Bonham 


KCAR 


Clarksville 


KCLE 


Cleburne 


KAND 


Corsicana 


KGKO 


Dallas 


KIXL 


Dallas 


KLIF 


Dallas 


KRLD 


Dallas 


KSKY 


Dallas 


WFAA 


Dallas 


WRR 


Dallas 



KDSX 


Denton 


KVLB 


Cleveland 


KERC 


Eastland 


WTAW 


College Station 


KCNC 


Ft. Worth 


KMCO 


Conroe 


KCUL 


Ft. Worth 


KULP 


El Campo 


KFJZ 


Ft. Worth 


KBRZ 


Freeport 


KNOK 


Ft. Worth 


KGBC 


Galveston 


KXOL 


Ft. Worth 


KLUF 


Galveston 


WBAP 


Ft. Worth 


KGRI 


Henderson 


KGAF 


Gainesville 


KCOH 


Houston 


KSU 


Gladewater 


KLBS 


Houston 


KSWA 


Graham 


KNUZ 


Houston 


KGVL 


Greenville 


KPRC 


Houston 


KHBR 


Hillsboro 


KTHT 


Houston 


KFRO 


Longview 


KTRH 


Houston 


KMHT 


Marshall 


KXYZ 


Houston 


KMAE 


McKinney 


KYOK 


Houston 


KORC 


Mineral Wells 


KSAM 


Huntsville 


KIMP 


Mt. Pleasant 


KEBE 


Jacksonville 


KRRV 


Sherman 


KTXJ 


jasper 


KTAN 


Sherman 


KOCA 


Kilgore 


KSTV 


Stephenville 


KFRO 


Longview 


KTER 


Terrell 


KLTI 


Longview 


KCMC 


Texarkana 


KRBA 


Lufkin 


KOSY 


Texarkana 


KTRE 


Lufkin 


KTFS 


Texarkana 


KSFA 


Nacogdoches 


KTUE 


Tulia 


KOSF 


Nacogdoches 


KGKB 


Tyler 


KOGT 


Orange 


KTBB 


Tyler 


KNET 


Palestine 


KBEC 


Waxahachie 


KLVL 


Pasadena 


KSYD 


Wichita Falls 


KOLE 


Port Arthur 


KTRN 


Wichita Falls 


KPAC 


Port Arthur 


KWFT 


Wichita Falls 


KFRD 


Rosenberg 


KSST 


Sulphur Springs 


KTLW 


Texas City 






KTEM 


Temple 


SOUTH TEXAS AREA 


KNAL 


Victoria 






KVIC 


Victoria 


KIOX 


Bay City 






KRCT 


Baytown 


MID-TEXAS AREA 


KREL 


Baytown 






KFDM 


Beaumont 


KNOW 


Austin 


KJET 


Beaumont 


KTBC 


Austin 


KRIC 


Beaumont 


KTXN 


Austin 


KTRM 


Beaumont 


KVET 


Austin 


KWHI 


Brenham 


KLEN 


Killeen 


KORA 


Bryan 


KCYL 


Lampasas 


KDET 


Center 


KMLW 


Marlin 



THANK YOUS 

Billion Dollar Dairy Industry 
Dairy Month Bigger than ever 

INDUSTRIES OF TEXAS 



KTEM 

KWTX 

WACO 

KMBL 

KTAE 



Temple 

Waco 

Waco 

Junction 

Taylor 



SAN ANTONIO AREA 



KNAF 

KCTI 

KENN 

KERV 

KGNB 

KBOP 



Fredericksburg 

Gonzales 

Kenedy 

Kerrville 

New Braunfels 

Pleasanton 



KCOR 


San Antonio 


COASTAL 


BEND AREA 




KENS 


San Antonio 


KBKI 


Alice 




KEXX 


San Antonio 


KIBL 


Beeville 




KITE 


San Antonio 


KCCT 


Corpus Chr 


sti 


KIWW 


San Antonio 


KEYS 


Corpus Chr 


sti 


KMAC 


San Antonio 


KRIS 


Corpus Chr 


sti 


KONO 


San Antonio 


KSIX 


Corpus Chr 


sti 


KTSA 


San Antonio 


KUNO 


Corpus Chr 


sti 


WOAI 


San Antonio 


KWBU 


Corpus Chr 


sti 


San Marcos 


KURV 


Edinburg 
Falfurrias 




KCNY 


KBLP 




KWED 


Seguin 


KINE 


Kingsville 




KVOU 


Uvalde 


KANN 


Sinton 





There 1 s not enough room on these two pages. ... or in the entire magazine. . . to express the whole- 
hearted appreciation of the Dairy Industry for your help. The biggest June Dairy Month in history was 
an outstanding success because of your readiness to cooperate in reminding the listeners and viewers 
of Texas that the daily use of dairy products is the keystone of health, pleasure and economy. 

We remain ever indebted to individual staff members tvho lent their skills and efforts to our cause. To 
the production, programming and talent personnel of the stations participating. . . and to the "front 
offices" who recognized the merchandising and promotional opportunities of June Dairy Month. . . we 
take pleasure and pride in saying "Thank You" for the 500,000 individuals employed by the Texas Dairy 
Industry. 

That means one of every fifteen employed persons in the state, earning and spending 15% °f a g T *~ 
cultural income, wants to shake your collective hand. For these members of the nation's healthiest, 
growing-est industry. . . and for those of us who were entrusted tvith the pleasant chore of making June 
Dairy Month an event to be remembered. . . we repeat again, "THANKS A MILLION!" 




BILL McDOUGALL 
AGRICULTURAL RELATIONS, LTD. 

for The American Dairy Association of Texas, 
representing the Texas Dairy Farmers 

in cooperation with 
The Dairy Products Manufacturers and 
Retail Outlets serving Texas consumers 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



Dow Chemical Co., Midland, Mich., will spon- 
sor 15-minute post-game Football Scoreboard 
at conclusion of seven of eight National Col- 
legiate Athletic Assn. games on NBC-TV in 
fall. Agency: MacManus, John & Adams, 
Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 

Evangelical Foundation Inc., Phila., through 
Walter F. Bennett & Co., Chicago, has launched 
new Bible Study Hour with Dr. Donald Grey 
Barnhouse, on NBC Radio (8:30-9 a.m. EDT). 

Prudential Insurance Co. of America, Newark, 
N. J., through Calkins & Holden, N. Y., will 
sponsor Air Force on CBS-TV for one hour 
on Nov. 11 and for 26 half-hours thereafter 
on Sundays, 6:30-7 p.m. After that, Prudential 
will resume sponsorship of You Are There in 
same time slot. 

American Chicle Co., N. Y, will sponsor half 
of hour-long Ozark Jubilee which moves from 
Saturdays, 7:30-to-9 p.m. to Thursdays, 10-11 
p.m. EDT on ABC-TV, effective Oct. 4. Sec- 
ond half of show will be co-operative. Agency: 
Ted Bates. 

A&A PEOPLE 

Arnold Blitz, part owner, first vice president 
and chief account executive of H. Richard 
Seller Adv., Portland, Ore., retired and plans 
to move to L. A. in fall. He owned Blitz Adv., 
Portland, until 1955. 

Jack Rafield, formerly vice president, Frank 
Block Assoc., St. Louis, and Steven Parrot, 
assistant account executive, Grant Adv., to 
Grey Adv., N. Y., as account executives; Mari- 
anne Herbert, formerly tv copywriter, Dowd, 
Redfield & Johnstone, N. Y., to Grey as radio- 
tv writer; Karnig Thomasian, formerly art di- 
rector, Mumm, Mullay & Nichols, to Grey 




J. G. MacDANIELS, manager of the Boston factory branch of Studebaker-Packard Corp., 
signs a 26-week contract for the midnight to 1 a.m. portion of the Jerry Howard Show 
on WEEI Boston, Monday through Saturday. Also present (I to r): seated, Jerry Howard, 
dressed as the character he portrays, "Slim Pickin's"; A. R. Marzelli, eastern regional 
manager for the automobile company; standing, Robert N. Sullivan of the Daniel F. 
Sullivan Co., Boston advertising agency; James Marooney, Studebaker-Packard sales 
manager, and Thomas Y. Gorman, sales manager of WEEI. 



art department, and Edward Handman, copy- 
writer, Daniel & Charles, to Grey in similar 
capacity. 




IN LOS ANGELES TV 



WHOSE COMMERCIALS GET MOST EXPOSURE? 

Hooper Index Of Broadcast Advertisers (Based on Broadcast Advertisers Reports' monitoring) 

NATIONAL (NETWORK) INDEX 



Rank Product & Agency 

1. Pillsbury (Leo Burnett) 

2. Betty Crocker (B. B. D. & O.) 



Hooper Index 

Network Total "Commercial of Broadcast 
Shows Networks Units" Advertisers 

4 13 29 

3 1 3% 26 



Rank Product & Agency 

1. Dromedary (Ted Bates) 

2. Pillsbury (Leo Burnett) 



LOS ANGELES INDEX (NETWORK PLUS SPOT) 

Hooper Index 

Network Total "Commercial of Broadcast 
Shows Networks Units" Advertisers 
- 2 15 49 

4 13 38 

3. Betty Crocker (B. B. D. & O.) 3 1 3% 22 

In the above summary, the monitoring occurred the week ending May 11, 1956. 
The Hooper Index of Broadcast Advertisers is a measure of the extent to which a 
sponsor's commercials are seen or heard. Each commercial is assigned a number of 
"commercial units," according to its length.* This number is then multiplied by the audi- 
ence rating attributed to that commercial.** When each commercial has thus been evalu- 
ated, the results for all commercials of each sponsor are added to form the HIBA. For 
further details of preparation, see the basic reports published by C. E. Hooper, Inc., 
Broadcast Advertisers Reports Inc. and American Research Bureau Inc. Above summary 
is prepared for use solely by Broadcasting • Telecasting. No reproduction permitted. 

• "Commercial Units": Commercials are taken from the monitored reports published by 
Broadcast Advertisers Reports Inc. A "commercial unit" is defined as a commercial exposure 
of more than 10 seconds but usually not more than one minute in duration. Four "commercial 
units" are attributed to a 30-mlnute program, and in the same proportion for programs of other 
lengths. A "station identification" equals one-half "commercial unit." 

** Audience ratings for television, both national and local, are those published by American 
Research Bureau Inc. Those for radio are the ratings of C. E. Hooper Inc. In the case of 
station breaks the average of the ratings for the preceding and following time periods is used 
wherever feasible: otherwise, the rating is that of either the preceding or following time 
period, normally the preceding. 



Carl Nichols, copy supervisor on Sunshine Bis- 
cuit Co., Folger coffee, Silvercup bread and 
other accounts, Cunningham & Walsh, N. Y., 
appointed vice president. He has been with 

agency r.ince 1946. 

William A. Rockett, with Chambers & Wiswell 
Inc., Boston, 10 years, named media director. 
Gene Kilham, formerly with WBZ-TV Boston 
and other stations, named radio-tv director of 

agency. 

Robert H. Davidson, with General Foods Corp. 
since 1940 in various sales, marketing and 
advertising posts, named national sales man- 
ager of GF's Jell-0 Division, succeeding 
Charles A. Kolb, recently named director of 
trade relations. 

Herbert Flaig, account executive, WKRC-TV 
Cincinnati, resigned to open advertising agency 
at 617 Vine St., Cincinnati. 

Paul Schlesinger from media supervisor to ac- 
count executive and Rudolph N. Carlson ap- 
pointed assistant merchandising manager at 
Tatham-Laird Inc., Chicago. Katherine Keat- 
ing and Joan Woodside to agency as copy- 
writers. 

John H. Thomas, formerly advertising manager 
of Indian Head Mills Inc., N. Y., named ad- 
vertising manager of Tussy Cosmetiques Div., 
Lehn & Fink Products Corp., N. Y. 

Roger N. Peterson, formerly vice president of 
Peterson & Kempner, to J. M. Mathes Inc. 
as account executive. 

Bernard Lundy promoted from advertising 
copywriter and house organ editor to adver- 
tising supervisor at Mystik Adhesive Products 
Co. (Mystik tape), Chicago. 

Louis B. McFarland, formerly treasurer of 
Webster Groves Trust Co., St. Louis, to ad- 
ministrative staff of Warner & Todd Inc., St. 
Louis agency. 



Page 44 



July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




*mjiLruvirLrLXTj~t_rq 





v / 

(A 




Quiet 

Grandeur. . 



The quiet grandeur of Southern architecture, 
Southern gardens, Southern charm still bespeaks 
itself in old traditions of which the Flag of the 
Confederacy remains an historical symbol. 

In today's industrially-expanding South, 
sentiments may remain in the past, but betting 
money is on the future. 

WRVA-TV is part of this active scene. New to 
1956 Richmond, its guiding traditions of service, 
blueprinted in 1925, are a valued heritage from 
long-established, deeply-respected WRVA Radio. 
To the television families in Richmond, these 
traditions are a powerful catalyst. They mean that 
WRVA-TV belongs to Richmond as no other television 
station ever has — or can. 

Represented nationally by Harrington, Righter and Parsons, Inc. 



WRVA-TV 

Richmond, Va. . ^ 

CBS Basic Channel J_ £ 



C. T. Lucy, President Barron Howard, l ice President and General Manager James D. Clark, Jr., Sales Manager 




Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 45 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



FILM 



Tv Features Radio 

RADIO will be featured on a television 
program — a half-hour show filmed in 
New York last week by The Christo- 
phers. The program, one of a new series 
of 15 tv shows being filmed for the 365 
stations carrying the weekly Christopher 
program in the U. S., Canada and over- 
seas, deals with "Radio's Great Power 
for Good," according to Father James 
Keller, director of The Christophers. 
Participants were Mutual President John 
B. Poor, who discussed "The Far-Reach- 
ing Coverage of Radio"; CBS Radio 
President Arthur Hull Hayes, who spoke 
on "The Rewards of a Career in Radio," 
and Don Durgin, vice president in charge 
of the ABC Radio Network, on "How 
the Audience Helps Strengthen Radio." 



Donald Davis, member of Pepsi-Cola Co. ac- 
count management group, and Victor Sack, 
assistant director of radio-tv production, The 
Biow Co., to Kenyon & Eckhardt, N. Y., re- 
spectively as account executive and commer- 
cial staff producer. 

Connel Murray, former news and communica- 
tions staffer, KNBC San Francisco, to Herman 
Mueller & Assoc., S. F. agency, as publicity 
writer and account executive. 

Robert Bassindale and Thomas Cadden to com- 
mercial department of Tatham-Laird Inc., Chi- 
cago, as writers-producers. Mary Afflick, re- 
cently promoted from producer-writer to com- 
mercial group supervisor at agency, assigned 
to Wander Co. (Ovaltine, Toddy) and C. A. 
Swanson & Sons accounts. 

Lee Ann Weimer promoted to assistant public 
relations director of Grant Adv. Inc., Chicago. 
Pat Flaherty, formerly in Grant's Hollywood 
office, assigned public relations regional ac- 
count executive for Floral Telegraph Delivery 
Assn. and Betty Renegar, formerly on publicity 
staff of Hotel Sherman, Chicago, will handle 
public relations for Grant Drake Hotel ac- 
count, same city. 

John T. Cunningham, assistant director of pub- 
lic relations, Anderson & Cairns, N. Y., to 
Morey, Humm & Warwick, N. Y., as public 
relations account executive. His replacement 
at A&C is Raymond Corder, editor of Uphol- 
stering Magazine. 

Jay Beneman, account executive, Feigenbaum 
& Wermen Adv., Phila. agency, married to 
Susan Adelaide Silberstein. 



McCadden Names Two V.P/s; 
Plans $6 Million for Shows 

PROMOTION of two executives of McCadden 
Productions to rank of vice president was an- 
nounced last week by President George Burns 
with the disclosure that the tv film company 
will invest about six million dollars this next 
season in new and continued program prod- 
uct. 

New vice presidents are Maurice Morton, 
director of business affairs, and Al Simon, 
executive in charge of production. 

Program lineup includes Burns & Allen 
Show, Bob Cummings Show, People's Choice 
and Marie Wilson Show, all CBS-TV; Impact, 
NBC-TV; Courage and Delightful lmposter, 
neither definitely scheduled. 

$1 Million for New Shows 
Earmarked by Screen Gems 

SCREEN GEMS Inc., New York, announced 
last week it has set aside $1 million for the 
development of new tv film programs. The de- 
cision was reached following a series of meet- 
ing among Screen Gems executives in Holly- 
wood. 

A quota of 20 new programs to be developed 
for the 1957-58 season was set at the meetings. 
Ralph Cohn, vice president and general man- 
ager of Screen Gems, reported that production 
on pilots for all new series will begin between 
Setember and December so that completed 
prints will be in the hands of the company's 
sales force no later than January 1957. 

Greene, Lanrerman Upped 
By ABC Film Syndication 

PROMOTION of Joseph F. Greene and Norma 
Lanterman to the newly-created posts of as- 
sistant to the vice president in charge of sales 
and office manager of the central division of 
ABC Film Syndication, respectively, is being 
announced today (Monday) by Don L. Kearney, 
vice president in charge of sales for ABC Film 
Syndication. 

Mr. Greene, formerly client service manager, 
will serve as assistant to Mr. Kearney, handling 
specifically the supervision of the contract de- 
partment, development of new business and 
sales analysis, both domestic and international. 
Miss Lanterman formerly was executive secre- 
tary in the Chicago sales office of ABC Film 
and will continue to make her headquarters in 
that city, reporting to Howard Anderson, sales 
manager of the central division. 

TPA Elects Melzak V. P. 

ELECTION of Vincent Melzak as vice presi- 
dent of Television Programs of America was 
announced last week by Milton A. Gordon, 
TPA president. Mr. Melzak will continue his 
present duties as head of TPA International. 
As vice president, he will work with Mr. 
Gordon on general administrative matters and 
with Michael M. Sillerman, executive vice 
president, in sales coordination and expansion. 

FILM PEOPLE 

John Kelly, station manager of KBRC-TV 
Abilene, Tex., and previously general manager 
of KTXL-TV San Angelo, Tex., appointed 
manager of Dallas office of Official Films Inc., 
N. Y. 

Lou Kravitz, formerly vice president for sales 
and advertising, Filmack Studios, Chicago, to 
Fred Niles Productions, Chicago, as account 
executive. 



Dick Klevickis, previously with Luckoff and 
Wayburn Inc., Detroit advertising agency, to 
creative writing staff of Kling Film Produc- 
tions, Chicago. 

FILM SALE 

Guild FUms Co., N. Y., reports WEWS-TV 
Cleveland has signed to carry Liberace Show 
for two years, extending to October 1958. 

FILM DISTRIBUTION 
UN Radio, N.Y., has entered field of syndicated 
tv production and distribution with availability 
of Guest of Honor film series. It consists of 
five half-hour programs of discussion on world 
problems by leaders of UN countries and, ac- 
cording to UN Radio, has been ordered by 32 
stations throughout the country for summer 
viewing. 

ABC Film Syndication, N. Y., has added "Fire 
Over England" to its "Anniversary Package" 
of feature films, raising to 16 total number of 
features in package. Film was produced by 
late Sir Alexander Korda and stars Laurence 
Olivier, Vivien Leigh, Flora Robson and Ray- 
mond Massey. 

Trans-Lux Television Corp., N. Y., making its 
program guide of more than 600 titles of film 
programs, produced by Encyclopaedia Britan- 
nica Films, available to tv stations and adver- 
tising agencies on request. About 150 pro- 
grams are offered in color. 

FILM RANDOM SHOTS 
Circle Film Labs., N. Y., has been bought by 
Fred Todaro, who joined film processing plant 
last July as superintendent. Name of company 
has been changed to Criterion Film Labs., with 
headquarters at 33 W. 70th St. 

International Sound Studios Inc., N. Y., has 

opened new motion picture sound recording 
studios in mid-Manhattan where it has built 
three sound stages. Firm will begin dubbing 
work shortly on package of 10 foreign motion 
pictures for television and theatrical release. 

Gommi-Tv, N. Y., has been formed to pro- 
duce films for tv and industry by Albert Gom- 
mi, advertising photographer. Offices and stu- 
dios will be located at 305 E. 47th St. Tele- 
phone is Eldorado 5-7650. Firm will concen- 
trate on food and allied products, under direc- 
tion of Ted R. Lazarus, formerly with Donahue 
& Coe and George Blake Enterprises, both 
N. Y. 

Filmack Studios, Chicago, announces new 
live action studio for production of filmed 
commercials in Filmack Bldg. at 1327 S. Wa- 
bash Ave. 



® 




Advance Schedule 
Of Network Color Shows 

(All times EDT) 

NBC-TV 

July 9-13 (3-4 p.m.) Matinee, participating 
sponsors (also July 16-20, 23-27, 30-31). 
July 11 (9-10 p.m.) Kraft Television The- 
atre, Kraft Foods, through J. Walter 
Thompson (also July 18, 25). 
July 15 (5-5:30 p.m.) Zoo Parade, sustain- 
ing (also July 22, 29). 

July 15 (7:30-9 p.m.) Sunday Spectacu- 
lar, "The Bachelor," participating spon- 
sors. 

July 18 (7:30-7:45 p. m.) J. P. Morgan 
Show, sustaining. 

July 19 (10-11 p.m.) Lux Video Theatre, 
Lever Bros. Co., through J. Walter 
Thompson (also July 26). 
July 21 (8-9 p.m.) Julius La Rosa Show, 
participating sponsors (also July 28). 
July 22 (9-10 p.m.) Alcoa Hour, Alu- 
minum Co. of America, through Fuller, 
Smith & Ross. 

July 23 (8-8:30 p.m.) Producer's Show- 
case, "Rosalinda," Ford Motor Co., 
through Kenyon & Eckhardt and RCA 
through Kenyon & Eckhardt, Al Paul 
Lefton & Grey. 

July 29 (9-10 p. m.) Goodyear Playhouse, 
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., through 
Young & Rubicam. 

[Note: This schedule will be corrected to 
press time of each issue of B-T] 



Page 46 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




than you think ! 




' N Uv * 




EEKZSE 

Emm 



Your sales message, wrapped in the WFLA-TV 
audience-building package of unduplicated NBC 
live programming, and delivered to the WFLA- 
TV billion dollar sales area, will produce sales that 
tip the scales high on the volume side! 

The WFLA-TV market is big . . . bigger than 
you think! WFLA-TV blankets the Tampa— St. 
Petersburg Metropolitan market, — AMERICA'S 
36TH RETAIL MARKET* — PLUS a rich 30-county 
area . . . Florida's SECOND MARKET. Here's 
what's in it for you! 

35% of Florida's POPULATION 
34% of Florida's RETAIL SALES 
35% of Florida's FOOD SALES 
31% of Florida's DRUG SALES 



BRADENTON 



SARASOTA 



WFLA-TV gives you intensive coverage of this big, fast-growing year 'round 
market — the only Florida station that delivers unduplicated NBC live programming 
within its 100 mile radius. . . . Your BLAIR-TV man can offer top-rated availabilities. 

* (Figures from Consumer Markets, J 955 and SM Survey of Buying Power, May 1956) 



National Representative 
BLAIR-TV 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 47 



-PLAYBACK- 

QUOTES WORTH REPEATING 



ADVERTISING'S CHAMPION 

Rep. Bob Wilson (R-Calif.), former part- 
ner in Champ-Wilson Advertising Agency, 
San Diego, addressing House of Repre- 
sentatives: 

ADVERTISING, I sometimes think, is 
one of the most maligned and least under- 
stood professions in the country. Admen 
are supposed to know how to use words, 
but we seem to use them to sell every- 
thing under the sun except ourselves. 

I have heard people who should know 
better, including some college professors, 
say the cost of advertising is an unjusti- 
fied burden on the consumer — that it 
raises the prices Americans pay for the 
necessities and luxuries of life. 

How ridiculous that is. Far from cost- 
ing the consumer money, advertising 
saves him millions of dollars a year. We 
can hold the prices of our products down 
only through mass distribution. We can 
obtain mass distribution only by inform- 
ing the maximum number of people of 
just what the products of American in- 
dustry can do for them. That is the 
function of advertising. 

LUXURY OF INTEGRITY 

Sydney W. Head, director of broadcast- 
ing and film services, U. of Miami (Fla.), 
in his book Broadcasting in America 
(Houghton Mifflin Co. Boston): 

OPERATION by the highest standards 
necessarily implies the freedom to make 
decisions. If acceptance or rejection of 
the next proffered account means the 
difference between survival and bank- 
ruptcy, the manager has no real freedom. 
He is governed by expediency; he cannot 
afford the luxury of integrity. 

The range in degrees of freedom among 
stations is tremendous. The manager of 
a station on a favorable channel in a 
rich market without excessive competi- 
tion can afford to set up statesmanlike 
long-term policies which look to the fu- 
ture as well as the present, which work 
toward the building of his station as an 
institution with a distinctive personality, 
good taste, and integrity. In practical 
terms, such policies will result in rejec- 
tion of all advertising of doubtful ethical 
value, discrimination in the selection of 
program material and talent, strict ad- 
herence to time limitations on commer- 
cial copy, scheduling of well-produced 
sustaining features in salable time-seg- 
ments, refusal to make deals in violation 
of published rates, and so on. 

Consider, by contrast, the situation of 
the manager of a station on an unfavor- 
able channel in an over-competitive, lim- 
ited market. He is not sure he can meet 
his payroll at the end of the week. What 
happens when he tells a salesman that the 
client he has just succeeded in selling 
is unacceptable to the station? Can he 



turn down a good prospect because the 
time desired by the advertiser happens to 
have been promised to the PTA? If a 
major sale hinges on an under-the-table 
rebate, can he afford to make a high- 
minded speech about the sanctity of rate 
cards? 

The wide range in what we have 
called "degrees of freedom" means that 
broadcasting is in many ways not at all 
the same thing for all stations and net- 
works. Because of such variations the 
NARTB has never been able to secure 
agreement on standards of practice which 
meet even the already-established stand- 
ards of some stations and networks. It 
simply is not realistic to expect every 
network to be able to meet the same 
standards as NBC, or an unaffiliated uhf 
television station in a small market to 
meet the same standards as a network 
key station in New York. 

Here, then, is a basic socio-economic 
problem created by the system of adver- 
tising support and competitive operation. 
It does not mean, of course, that all 
small, underprivileged stations are by 
definition unethical. Many in radio have 
found a modus vivendi by narrowing 
their service down to meet the needs of 
special groups; by skillful and efficient 
management many such stations offer a 
highly satisfactory service within the lim- 
itations they have marked out for them- 
selves. (No such solution has yet been 
found, however, for the small-scale tele- 
vision operation.) 

TV NO MAGIC BOX 

Sig Mickelson, CBS vice president in 
charge of news and public affairs, speak- 
ing of "The Electronic Revolution in 
Politics": 

WHEN some future historian sits down 
to write the history of the 1956 political 
campaigns, I think it very probable that 
he will build his history around the revo- 
lution in campaign methods brought 
about by the new importance of electronic 
communications. 

This is the first campaign year in which 
television has become the dominant 
medium in the thinking and planning of 
the national committees. The evidence 
is already piling high. 

The President and his advisers are 
planning a "television campaign." Offi- 
cials of both parties have advertised the 
fact that they are tailoring their conven- 
tions to the demands of television. In 
pleading for funds, both national chair- 
men stress the cost of purchasing tele- 
vision time. Candidates in the pre-con- 
vention primaries have moved into doubt- 
ful states with television advisers and 
formulas, some good, some bad, for pre- 
senting television programs. . . . 

I wonder whether the enthusiasm with 
which television is being embraced as 
the 1956 campaign gets under way may 



not lead to disillusionment in the medium 
if that enthusiasm is not tempered with 
some hard political judgment. 

The fact is, that unless used wisely, 
television may not be the magic box 
which, when used, leads the way to the 
politician's Utopia. Ineptitude and care- 
lessness could destroy the magic charm. 

It seems to me there are five principles 
which could very well govern the use of 
television in the year 1956 if television 
is to yield the spectacular results of which 
it is fully capable. They are: 

Rule 1. The candidate or his spokes- 
man should be himself. He should not 
hoke up the act with obvious histrionics. 

Rule 2. Remember that it is the whole 
impression through the campaign that 
counts, not the one created on a single 
program. 

Rule 3. Interest in a candidate cannot 
be created solely on the basis of the ex- 
ternal trappings of showmanship which 
may surround a program. Interest, sym- 
pathy and understanding have to be 
created by the candidate himself or by 
the person speaking in his behalf. 

Rule 4. Do not think of television 
purely as a "showbusiness medium." It 
is essentially a medium of communica- 
tions as are newspapers, magazines, and 
radio and not just a vaudeville stage. 

Rule 5. Recognize television's vast po- 
tential for the communication of ideas. 
Many politicians who would pay hard 
cash to buy time to make a speech on 
television would literally throw away even 
better time by failing to include televi- 
sion reporters and cameramen in their 
plans for coverage of an interesting news 
event or press conference. Those who 
get the most mileage from television will 
be those who learn this lesson early as 
did President Eisenhower when he ad- 
mitted television newsfilm cameras to his 
press conference. 

DON'T FORGET THE SHOW 

Donald H. McGannon, president of West- 
inghouse Broadcasting Co., addressing the 
Catholic Broadcasters Assn. in Boston: 

HUMAN NATURE poses a real chal- 
lenge for the religious or educational 
broadcaster, because many people today 
would rather be entertained than taught 
or inspired. And television and radio 
are constantly striving to develop new 
ways to heighten entertainment values. 
In order to capture and hold the attention 
of an audience of respectable size — in 
fact, even to avoid having a disastrous 
effect on the audience levels of programs 
that follow — a religious or educational 
program must utilize a high degree of 
showmanship, without, of course, com- 
promising the integrity of its message. 
Bishop Fulton Sheen's broadcasts are just 
one excellent proof that this can be done 
successfully. 



Page 48 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



IN INLAND CALIFORNIA (and western Nevada) 




delivers more 
for the money 





These inland radio stations, purchased as a unit, give you more 
listeners than any competitive combination of local stations . . . 
and at the lowest cost per thousand! (SAMS and SR&D) 

More people live in this mountain-isolated Beeline area than in 
all of Colorado. They have over $3V2 billion in spendable income. 

(Sales Management's 1956 Copyrighted Survey) 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA • Paul H. Raymer Co., National Representative 




Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 49 



PROGRAM SERVICES 



Two Radio Stations Sign 
Laurence News Features 

WHBI Newark, N. J., and KVMA Magnolia, 
Ark., are the latest stations to engage a corps 
of foreign correspondents by tape through 
Laurence News Features, New York. 

In the Laurence service, exclusive stories and 
interviews are taped by newsmen in key capi- 
tals of the world, personalized with client- 
station's call letters and city, and rushed to the 
radio station by air express. 

Thesaurus Series Issued 

A NEW, five-minute transcribed radio series, 
Great American Women, featuring actor Basil 
Rathbone, is being sent to RCA Thesaurus sta- 
tion subscribers by the program library service. 

The series of 65 programs, narrations about 
such famous women as Amelia Earheart, Poca- 
hontas, and Grandma Moses, can be used 
either as individual shows or as part of re- 
gular women's programs. 

PROGRAM SERVICE PEOPLE 

Walter Kerr, author-playwright and drama 
critic for New York Herald-Tribune, retained by 
Tv-Radio Workshop of Ford Foundation as 
drama consultant. 

Dick Norman, film director, KPTV (TV) Port- 
land, Ore., to director of Pictures Inc., Anchor- 
age, Alaska, theatrical distributor. Mr. Norman 
is president of Region 17, National Assn. of 
Television Film Directors. 

Robert Saudek, director of Tv-Radio Work- 
shop of Ford Foundation, and executive pro- 
ducer of Omnibus on ABC-TV, will address 
special three-day conference on commercial 
television in relation to education at Harvard 
U. Summer School, Cambridge, Mass., begin- 
ning July 16. 

PROGRAM SERVICE SHORTS 

Community Club Services, Boston sales promo- 
tion firm, has appointed S. W. Caldwell Ltd., 
Toronto, to represent CCS in Canada. 

Cambridge School of Radio & Television Broad- 
casting, New York, has opened new Cambridge 
Television Center, making available to adver- 
tising agencies, production firms, networks and 
independent stations complete rehearsal facili- 
ties, studios for filming commercials, closed 
circuit tv system for sales meetings, audio and 
video recording studio, film editing shops and 
meeting halls. New center is located at 1481 
Broadway (Times Square). 

Aaron Rothenberg & Assoc., Beverly Hills, 
Calif., appointed by MCA-TV to create ex- 
ploitation merchandise for sponsors of Adven- 
tures of Kit Carson tv film series. 

World Broadcasting System has added new set 
of safety jingles by composer Frank Luther to 
service features, bringing to total of 48 num- 
ber of safety songs and jingles available from 
World. 

RCA Thesaurus, N.Y., has signed WACE Chi- 
copee, Mass., WGHN Grand Haven, Mich., 
KNDY Marysville, Kan., and KMRS Morris, 
Minn., as subscribers. 

Castle Newell Productions, specializing in crea- 
tion and production of radio-tv musical back- 
grounds and musical commercials, has been 
re-established at 2501 East Chevy Chase Drive, 
Glendale r Calif., - Mr. Newell has announced. 
For several years he has been supervising music 
instruction in L.A. public schools. 




BUICK's spring fashion commercial is vocalized at Olmsted's by (1 to r) Clyde 
Sechler, Jeff Clark, Ralph Cummings and Gordon Goodman. At controls: Richard 
Olmsted. 



THE PLUSH SIDE OF THE RECORD 



EIGHT hundred thousand dollars laid out 
for a new, bigger, luxury-type studio layout, 
with plans already afoot for further expan- 
sion. That's Olmsted Sound Studios' tangi- 
ble tribute to the strength of the aural 
medium. 

Olmsted, at 1 East 54th St., New York, 
is a radio recording firm whose principal 
business is producing and/ or recording com- 
mercials for advertisers and agencies. It 
would be correct — but misleading — to report 
that its volume today is 1,000% higher than 
a year ago, for Olmsted was just getting 
started a year ago. It is apparent, however, 
that business is good — and good business at 
a commercial recording studio reflects good 
business in radio. 

Headed by Henry C. Olmsted as president 
and his son Richard as executive vice presi- 
dent and chief engineer, Olmsted Sound 
Studios opened for business in January 
1955. By December the firm had to spread 
out, taking an additional floor and thereby 
doubling its facilities. The $800,000 redec- 
orating job which transformed the space into 
plush studios and offices and efficient as well 
as shiny control rooms has just been com- 
pleted. Now Olmsted is getting ready to 
take over still more space. 

In insisting on swank decor for the studios 
and offices, Executive Vice President Olm- 
sted goes on the theory that agency people — ■ 
who are among the chief users of the facili- 
ties — will be more comfortable, and there- 
fore able to work better, in surroundings 
akin to those they have in their own homes. 
Thus he's tried to make the place "home- 
like" from thick-carpeted floor to easy chairs 
to wall prints and fixtures — even to a small, 
emergency bar to which clients may repair 
after long, unsteadying sessions on a 60- 
second spot. 

The length of the Olmsted client list itself 
is a clue to the amount of radio activity that 
is going on generally. It includes most of 
the top agencies, a number of jingles firms, 
at least two radio stations, and the U. S. 
government, among others. Both ABC and 
CBS Radio also are clients. 



Among current agency clients are BBDO; 
McCann-Erickson; William Esty Co.; N. W. 
Ayer & Son; Campbell-Ewald; Leo Burnett 
Co.; Morey, Humm & Warwick; Sullivan, 
Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles; Anderson & 
Cairns; Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shen- 
field; Kenyon & Eckhardt; Kudner; Cun- 
ningham & Walsh; Calkins & Holden; 
Grant, and Buchanan & Co. 

In addition to commercials for use on 
U. S. stations, Olmsted is developing foreign- 
commercials business. Goodall Fabrics, for 
example, taped a commercial in Haitian 
Creole to sell Palm Beach suits to Haitians. 
Griffin Polish, International Salt, and 
Quaker Oats are among those that reach 
Puerto Rico, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, 
Peru, Panama and Venezuela in several 
Spanish dialects recorded by Olmsted. 

The firm also does a sizable amount of 
non-broadcast business. Westinghouse Elec- 
tric Corp., for instance, recorded a "Watch 
Westinghouse" song there and had Olmsted 
play it at the 1956 stockholders' meeting, 
then print up a recording for mailing to each 
of more than 100,000 stockholders. 

From time to time Olmsted's is called 
upon to record the sound track on a 
film — and for one independent tv producer, 
who was peddling a pilot film to agencies, 
the firm made individual recordings for dif- 
ferent agency executives, outlining its merits 
for the clients of each. 




THE executive chiefs at Olmsted. At right 
is Henry C. Olmsted, president; at left, 
Richard B. Olmsted, executive vice presi- 
dent and chief engineer. 



Page 50 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 51 



GOVERNMENT 

INDUSTRY EXPRESSES DOUBTS 
ABOUT FCC ALLOCATION PLAN 

Some comment that Commission acted to relieve pressure from Capi- 
. tol Hill. Attitude of new Comr. Craven is speculated with consensus 
that he's more in favor of uhf. Petitions for changes resume. 



WITH a full week's contemplation of the im- 
port of the FCC's report and order on tv alloca- 
tions under their belts, broadcasters — and those 
who advise them — had two questions on their 
lips last week. They were: 

• Is the Commission serious? 

• What will Craven do? 

The FCC two weeks ago held that the 
best solution for the ills of tv was the eventual 
— but unscheduled — move of tv to the uhf, in 
all or a major part of the country. This was 
predicated on the development of uhf to equality 
to vhf in coverage, equipment costs and de- 
sign. The FCC also issued proposed rule-making 
notices in 13 specific cities, proposing either 
complete or partial deintermixture [BeT, July 2]. 

The majority observation on the FCC's 
action was one of strong doubt that it meant 
what it said. This was particularly strong about 
moving tv to an all-uhf service. 

The word "phoney" was used by more than 
one source. Other comments were more pithy: 

"The Commission is trying to ration revenues, 
programs, and network affiliations." "The 
FCC is bailing out those enterpreneurs who are 
in trouble. That's free enterprise?" "Another 
year of jazzing around!" 

Many comments — all from reputable, in- 
formed sources who for obvious reasons asked 
for anonymity — were phrased to indicate that 
they thought the Commission's document was 
forced by politics— by the pressures from Capi- 
tol Hill. "The Commission was forced to do 
something to get the Hill off its neck," one 
Washington lawyer observed. 

There were some thoughts expressed that in 
perhaps a year or so maybe three or four of 
the 13 cities might be truly be deintermixed. The 
others will never go through, was this reaction. 

One Washington attorney who numbers sev- 
eral successful uhf operators among his clients 
was particularly bitter at the Commission's boost 
in maximum uhf power to five million watts. 
The advantages, at best, are marginal, he said. 
Yet, if one uhf station in a market increases its 
power to the maximum, all uhf stations in that 
market must follow. There is the huge initial 
capital cost, he pointed out, to say nothing of 
the terrific maintenance financial load. 

Questions Coverage Tables 

A consulting engineer raised his eyebrows at 
what he called the "extension" of Grade B 
service implied in the new FCC coverage tables. 
That might be true 20% of the time in ideal 
terrain, he declared. 

Several comments were made about incon- 
sistencies. The Hartford situation was used as 
an illustration by one observer. Ch. 3, he 
pointed out, had been first assigned to New 
London, Conn. After the Sixth Report in 1952 
it was moved to Hartford. Now, he shrugged, 
it goes to Providence. Why? he asked. 

Other inconsistencies, it was pointed out, in- 
volved Norfolk, Va.; Pittsburgh, Pa.; Sacra- 
mento, Calif.; Corpus Christi, Tex.; Spartan- 
burg, S. C, and Raleigh, N. C. In these the 
FCC took no action, but in similar circum- 
stances (Albany, New Orleans), notices of pro- 
posed rule-making were issued. 

From several sources disappointment was 
expressed that the Commission had not pro- 
vided for "squeeze -ins" — low-powered, low- 
antenna height vhfs "in order to provide three 

Page 52 • July 9, 1956 



equivalent services" as one put it. 

All comments were not pessimistic. There 
were some favorable reactions. 

Even if only a few of the 13 "pilot" cities 
are really and truly deintermixed, it will mean 
that uhf remains as an established and operating 
service. This means manufacturers will have to 
continue making uhf sets and "Madison Ave." 
will know that uhf hasn't died. That was one 
advocate's viewpoint. 

If there was any doubt of the Commission's 
sincerity, another observed, its actions in pro- 
hibiting construction in Peoria and Springfield 
should have dispelled that. He referred to the 
June 27 grants of ch. 8 to WIRL Peoria, 111., 
and ch. 2 to WMAY-TV Inc., Springfield, 111. 
The Commission forbade construction until the 
proposed rule-making in those cities. 

In a prepared statement, George A. Mayoral, 
WJMR-TV New Orleans, declared: "The FCC's 
proposed decision looking toward the eventual 
shift of all television broadcasting to the uhf 
region of the spectrum was the only proposal 
that the FCC could have made in view of all 
the problems involved . . . This is a national 
solution to a national problem . . ." 

The attitude of new Comr. T. A. M. Craven 
was the subject of much speculation. It was 
pointed out that five of the 13 deintermixture 
notices were made on four to three votes. These 
were Elmira, N. Y.; Hartford, Conn.; Madison, 
Wis.; Norfolk, Va.; Albany, N. Y. 

It was the consensus, however, that Comr. 
Craven's basic, long time attitude was more 
favorable to uhf than otherwise. It was recalled 
that as early as 1945 he had recommended that 
commercial television operate in the uhf band. 
It was also recalled that in the current alloca- 
tions proceedings, Mr. Craven, in his own 
name, had suggested an allocations plan which 
would have deintermixed all the major cities 
in Zone I except in 10 instances. 

On the other hand, it was felt in some circles, 
Comr. Craven would be loath to disturb vhf 
grants made after long and expensive hearings. 
"He's been on the outside," one source ob- 
served, "and he knows what a hearing means." 

Meanwhile, petitions for changes in the allo- 
cations structure began coming into the FCC 



BOXSCORE 

STATUS of tv cases before FCC: 

AWAITING FINAL DECISION: 10 

Corpus Christi, Tex., ch. 10; Miami, Fla., 
ch. 10; Seattle. Wash., ch. 7; Jacksonville, 
Fla., ch. 12; Hartford, Conn., ch. 3: Pa- 
ducah. Ky., ch 6; Indianatiolis, Ind.. ch. 13; 
New Orleans, La., ch. 4; St. Louis, Mo., ch. 
11; Charlotte, N. C, ch. 9. 

AWAITING ORAL ARGUMENT: 8 

Boston, Mass., ch. 5; Orlando, Fla., ch. 9; 
McKeesport, Pa., (Pittsburgh), ch. 4: Buf- 
falo, N. Y.. ch. 7; Biloxi, Miss., ch. 13; San 
Francisco-Oakland. Calif., ch. 2; Lead- 
Deadwood, S. D., ch. 5; Pittsburgh, Pa., ch. 
11. 

AWAITING INITIAL DECISION: 3 

Hatfield, Ind., (Owensboro, Ky.), ch. 9; 
Toledo, Ohio, ch. 11; Onondaga-Parma, 
Mich., ch. 10. 

LN HEARING: 4 

Beaumont-Port Arthur. Tex., ch. 4; Che- 
boygan, Mich., ch. 4; Mayaguez, P. R., ch. 
3; Coos Bay, Ore., ch. 16. 



after a lapse of some months. In the last 10 
days six rule-making petitions have been filed. 

They include: (1) adding ch. 11 to Coos Bay, 
Ore., from Yreka, Calif.; (2) substituting ch. 
8 for ch. 55 in Mt. Airy, N. C; (3) allocating 
ch. 3 to Ainsworth, Neb.; (4) moving ch. 5 
from Raleigh to Rocky Mount, N. C, and add- 
ing a reserved uhf channel to Raleigh; (5) 
changing the educational reservation from ch. 
1 to chs. 6 or 10 in Corpus Christi, Tex., or 
deleting chs. 6 and 10 from Corpus Christi; 
(6) delete educational reservation from ch. 7 
in Jacksonville, Fla., or remove ch. 12 and add 
ch. 46 to Jacksonville. 

There are more than 50 such petitions await- 
ing action at the FCC. The complete list: 
Ft. Smith, Fayetteville, Ark. — Delete ch. 5. 

from Ft. Smith and assign to Fayetteville. 
Bakersfield, Calif.— Add 17 or 17 and 39 to 

Bakersfield. 

Bishop, Calif. — Allocate either ch. 3, 8, 17, 19 
or 25 to Bishop. 

*Fresno, Madera, Calif. — Change Fresno edu- 
cational reservation from ch. 18 to 53 or 
swap ch. 53 for ch. 30 at Madera. 

*Pueblo, Alamosa, Colo. — Delete ch. 3 from 
Pueblo and assign to Alamosa, Colo. 

Jacksonville, Fla. — Delete educational reserva- 
tion at Jacksonville, changing educational 
ch. 7 to commercial, or delete ch. 12 and 
add ch. 46. 

*New Port Richey, Bunnel, Fla. — Add ch. 10 

to New Port Richey. 
Cartter, 111. — Allocate ch. 13 to Cartter. 
Harrisburg, 111., Bowling Green, Ky. — Replace 

ch. 22 Harrisburg with ch. 13, deleting latter 

from Bowling Green. 
Peoria, Galesburg, III. — Substitute ch. 25 for 

ch. 43 at Peoria, and substitute ch. 77 for 

ch. 40 at Galesburg. 
Springfield, Lincoln, 111. — Allocate ch. 39 to 

Springfield, and substitute ch. 49 for ch. 53 

at Lincoln, 111. 
Indianapolis, Anderson, Ind. — Allocate ch. 26 

to Anderson, deleting ch. 61 from that city; 

delete ch. 26 from Indianapolis and add ch. 

77 there. 

Evansville, Ind., Owensboro, Ky., Festus, Mo., 
Shelbyville, Tenn. — Delete ch. 62 from 
Evansville and add ch. 14; delete ch. 14 from 
Owensboro, add ch. 62; delete ch. 14 from 
Festus, add ch. 25, and delete ch. 62 from 
Shelbyville, add ch. 56. 

Ft. Wayne, Angola, Ind. — Assign ch. 15 to Ft. 
Wayne, substituting ch. 77 for ch. 15 at 
Angola, Ind. 

*Des Moines, Iowa — Shift educational reserva- 
tion from ch. 11 to uhf. 

Ho ii ma. La. — (1) Delete ch. 30 from Houma, 
add ch. 11. (2) Add ch. 11 to Houma. 

*Nashaquitsa, Mass. — Assign ch. 6 to Nasha- 
quitsa. 

*Marquette, Calumet, Mich. — Add ch. 13 to 

Marquette; substitute ch. 5 for ch. 13 at Calu- 
met, Mich. 

*ClarksdaIe, Indianola, Cleveland, Ruleville, 
Greenwood, Miss. — (1) Move ch. 6 at Clarks- 
dale to Indianola, and assign ch. 44 to Clarks- 
dale. (2) Delete ch. 6 from Clarksdale and 
add to Cleveland or Ruleville or in an area 
between Cleveland, Ruleville, Greenwood and 
Indianola. 

*Greenwood, Miss. — Move ch. 6 to Greenwood. 
Helena, Bozeman, Mont. — Delete ch. 12 from 

Helena and reallocate to Bozeman. 
Glendive, Mont. — Allocate ch. 5 to Glendive. 
Missoula and Kalispell, Mont., Sandpoint, Iowa 

— Add ch. 8 to Missoula; substitute ch. 25 for 

9 at Sandpoint, and substitute ch. 9 for 8 at 

Kalispell. 

Ainsworth, Neb. — Add ch. 3 to Ainsworth. 

*Proposed rule-making issued by the FCC, but 
no final decision yet issued. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



Another thinly disguised WJR success story 




When they were certain it was accurate, 
they told the listeners about it. They were 
careful, they were calm, and they included 
safety precautions. 

"I am sure," wrote one woman later, 
"that WJR's prompt reporting of sound 
information, and its calm despite the dan- 
ger, saved many people from near-panic." 

An Ohioan nearby listened to WJR from 
6 p.m. to 3 a.m., circling all twister areas 
on a map. "We are deeply grateful to the 
news staff and all others for their constant 
vigil," he wrote. "We depended entirely 
on their faithful service." 

People in the WJR area have learned 
that WJR newscasts are dependable, fac- 
tual and more comprehensive. That's why 
the recent study by Alfred Politz Re- 
search, Inc. shows that 42% of all radio 
listeners tune to WJR for news. 



May 12 was an unusual day in Michigan. 
At 2:30 p.m. that Saturday WJR broad- 
cast a tornado alert — and it wasn't lifted 
until 3 a.m. Sunday. In seven hours 27 
twisters had smashed their lethal paths 
across the state. 

It was dark, it thundered, flashed light- 
ning, and rained sheets — and it was down- 
right scary. 

From 6 p.m. to 3 a.m. WJR broadcast 
complete reports, every half-hour. Three 
newscasters (and one newscaster's wife), 
every engineer and every announcer 
helped gather information, answered 
phones, and got the news on the air. 

Their job was simple: from hundreds of 
panicky reports they sifted accurate infor- 
mation. It waschecked and double checked 
with the station's direct weather bureau 
wire and with police chiefs in stricken areas. 



The Great Voice of the Great Lakes 



WJR 



Detroit 



50,000 Watts CBS Radio Network 



Here's WJR's primary coverage area. 
Write us for your free copy of the Politz report 
or ask your Henry I. Christal Co. man. 




Broadcasting 



TELECAS TING 



July 9, 1956 



Page 53 



GOVERNMENT 



Lincoln, Neb. — Change Lincoln educational 
reservation from ch. 18 to 12. 

Nadine, N. M., Monahans, Tex. — Add ch. 9 to 
Nadine, substituting ch. 35 for 9 at Mona- 
hans. 

*Roswell, Artesia, N. M. — Remove ch. 10 
from Roswell, and assign to Artesia. 

Fairfield, N. Y.— Allocate ch. 2 to Fairfield. 

Mt. Airy, N. C. — Substitute ch. 8 for ch. 55 at 
Mt. Airy. 

Raleigh, Rocky Mount, N. C. — Delete ch. 5 
from Raleigh and substitute a reserved edu- 
cational uhf channel. Add ch. 5 to Rocky 
Mount. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. — Allocate ch. 8 to Win- 
ston-Salem. 

Youngstown, Ohio-Pittsburgh, New Castle, Pa.- 
Clarksburg, W. Va. — Substitute ch. 33 for 
73 at Youngstown, ch. 22 for 47 at Pitts- 
burgh, ch. 79 for 22 at Clarksburg, and/or 
move ch. 45 from New Castle to Youngstown. 

Elk City-Woodward, Okla. — Delete ch. 8 from 
Woodward, adding it to Elk City; add ch.35 
to Woodward. 

Coos Bay. Ore., Yreka, Calif. — Add ch. 11 to 
Coos Bay, substituting ch. 19 for ch.ll at 
Yreka. 

Prineville, Ore. — Allocate ch. 11 to Prineville. 
Harrisburg, Lancaster, Williamsport, Pa. — 

Switch ch. 71 at Harrisburg for ch. 21 at 
Lancaster and substitute ch. 26 for 36 at 
Williamsport. 

*Shinglehouse, and Meadville, Pa. Clymer 
N. Y. — Add ch. 26 to Shinglehouse; add ch. 
37 at Meadville, Pa. 

Williamsport, Pa. — Allocate ch. 26 to Williams- 
port. 

York, Lancaster, Pa. — (1) Switch ch. 49 at York 
for ch. 21 at Lancaster. (2) Delete ch. 43 
from York and add to Lancaster; delete ch. 
21 from Lancaster and add to York. 

Charleston, Sandy Run, S. C. — Allocate ch. 5 
to Sandy Run, deleting ch. 5 from Charleston 
and substituting ch. 4. 

Reliance, Pierre, S. D. — Delete ch. 6 from 
Pierre, S. D., and assign it to Reliance. 

St. Joseph, Lexington, Tenn. — Allocate ch. 11 
to St. Joseph, deleting educational ch. 11 
from Lexington, Term., and substituting edu- 
cational ch. 49. 

* College Station, Tex. — Change educational 
ch. 3 to commercial, reserving either ch. 48 
or ch. 54 for educational use. 

Corpus Christi, Tex. — Change educational res- 
ervation at Corpus Christi from ch. 16 to 
ch. 6 or 10, or delete ch. 6 or 10 and add to 
other cities in nearby area. 

Lubbock, Tex. — Change Lubbock educational 
reservation from ch. 20 to 5. 

Lufkin- — Nacogdoches, Tex. — Change Lufkin 
ch. 9 to Lufkin-Nacogdoches as hyphenated 
community, permit KTRE-TV Lufkin to be 
identified with both cities. 

Nacogdoches and Tyler, Tex., Lake Charles, 
La. — Delete ch. 19 from Tyler, add it to 
Nacogdoches. Add ch. 61 to Tyler. Add ch. 
66 to Lake Charles and delete educational 
ch. 19. 

*CIarkston, Wash. — Allocate chs. 34 and 40 to 
Clarkston. 

*Moses Lake, Walla Walla, Wash Substitute 

ch. 11 at Moses Lake for ch. 8 at Walla 
Walla, Wash., and add ch. 8 to Moses Lake. 

Wenatchee, Wash., Coeur d'Alene, Idaho — 

Add ch. 12 to Wenatchee; substitute ch. 29 
for ch. 12 at Coeur d'Alene. 
*Weston, W. Va. — Change educational ch. 5 
at Weston to commercial. 



^Proposed rule-making issued by the FCC, but no 
final decision yet issued. 




T. A. M. CRAVEN took the oath of office 
as an FCC commissioner for the second 
time last week when he assumed office on 
July 2 replacing Edward M. Webster. 
Comr. Craven, a U. S. Navy Reserve com- 
mander, served once before, from 1937 to 
1944. Mr. Craven (r) is being sworn in 
by FCC Chairman George C. McCon- 
naughey. The ceremony took place before 
a roomful of friends at the FCC. After the 
oath, Comr. Craven paid tribute to former 
Comr. Webster, who was in the audience, 
and Mr. Webster replied in kind. 

A graduate of U. S. Naval Academy 
(1913), Comr. Craven served in World 
War I as a specialist in radio communica- 
tions. He was on the staff of the Federal 
Radio Commission in charge of nonbroad- 
cast engineering matters, 1928-30; in 
private radio practice to 1935, when he 
became FCC chief engineer. After his first 
term as a commissioner, he again entered 
private engineering practice. He became 
the senior member of Washington consul- 
ting engineers Craven, Lohnes & Culver in 
1949. He is a fellow of the Institute of 
Radio Engineers and a past president of 
the Assn. of Federal Communications Con- 
sulting Engineers. 



KTVQ (TV) Bid for Ch. 11 
Again Turned Down by FCC 

SECOND REQUEST by ch. 25 KTVQ (TV) 
Oklahoma City to use educational ch. 11 at 
Tulsa on a temporary basis was denied last 
week by the FCC. KTVQ, dark since last 
December, went off the air under court order 
following heavy uhf losses. 

The Oklahoma City station earlier had asked 
for and was denied FCC permission to utilize 
ch. 11 at Tulsa until the grantee, educational 
KOED-TV, was ready to go on the air. The 
request was opposed by the Joint Committee 
on Educational Tv and Oklahoma Educational 
Tv Authority (OETA), KOED-TV permittee. 

The second KTVQ request [B»T, May 14] 
was predicated on an understanding by KTVQ 
that OETA no longer was opposed to tempo- 
pary use of its Tulsa channel. KTVQ proposed 
to use the tower and transmitter of deleted ch. 
19 KMPT (TV) Oklahoma City and operate 
for the duration of the KTVQ construction 
permit or — whichever is first — whenever 
KOED-TV was ready to commence operation. 



Lawmakers' Recording Studio 
Split Into Separate Units 

THE President has signed into law a bill (HR 
11,473 — now Public Law 624) which splits the 
Joint Senate-House Recording Facility into the 
House Recording Studio and Senate Record- 
ing Studio, respectively. The complete split 
must be made by Sept. 30. 

The two studios will perform for representa- 
tives and senators, respectively, the same duties 
performed before by the joint facility; namely, 
taping and filming reports and speeches by 
congressmen to be used in campaigning or mak- 
ing reports to constituents over radio and tv 
stations in their home states. These services 
are performed normally at a lower cost to con- 
gressmen than equivalent commercial services. 

The division of the joint facility into two 
separate studios was decided upon after the re- 
sults of two reports by the General Accounting 
Office were made public [B«T, June 4, May 7]. 
The reports said that Robert J. Coar, coordi- 
nator of the joint facility and his wife, Helen, 
studio director, were engaged in a similar busi- 
ness in nearby Virginia; that government equip- 
ment was missing; that employes of the facility 
received income from outside sources, and that 
an unlisted telephone was maintained on the 
premises. Mrs. Coar, a House employe, was 
fired, but no action was taken in the case of 
Mr. Coar, a Senate employe. 

The Coars came in for both criticism and 
praise in House debate on HR 11,473. It was 
understood that Mr. Coar will head the Sen- 
ate Recording Studio when it is set up. 

The two new studios will divide the equip- 
ment and other assets of the joint facility. Both 
will be administered from separate revolving 
funds established in the Treasury for House 
and Senate contingent funds, respectively. The 
new law prohibits personnel from engaging in 
outside work similar to that performed at the 
respective studios. 

The House studio will be supervised by the 
House Clerk under the direction of a three- 
man committee of congressmen appointed by 
the House Speaker. The Senate unit will be 
supervised by the Senate Sergeant-at-Arms un- 
der direction of the Senate Rules & Adminis- 
tration Committee. 

Senate Bill Would Ban 
Misleading Names, Art 

THE SENATE last week passed a bill (S 2891) 
which would prohibit the use by certain busi- 
ness concerns of the letters "U. S." in their 
firm or corporate names or of pictures in their 
advertising which falsely convey the impression 
that such a firm is a government agency or 
that its obligations are guaranteed by the gov- 
ernment. 

Already prohibited to the same firms are the 
terms "national," "federal," "United States," 
"reserve" and "Deposit Insurance." 

Pictures prohibited under the bill are those 
of the Capitol Building or any other public 
building of the United States. 

Types of firms prohibited from using these 
words or pictures, "except as permitted by the 
laws of the United States," are banks, loan com- 
panies, building and loan companies and brok- 
erage, factorage, insurance, indemnity, savings 
or trust firms. 

It was noted in floor discussion that the 
Senate does not intend that the bill be made 
retroactive to apply to companies which already 
are "lawfully using such name or title" if and 
when the bill becomes law. The measure was 
sent to the House. 



Page 54 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



Network Investigation 
Will End July 17-18 

THE Senate Commerce Committee winds up 
hearings July 17-18 for this congressional ses- 
sion in its investigation of tv networks and 
allocation problems, Kenneth A. Cox, special 
radio-tv counsel, said last week. 

The FCC will occupy July 17 and possibly 
part of the following day, with most of the 
Commission testimony to be on its proposed 
allocations plan [B«T, July 2]. Also scheduled 
on July 18 are Mrs. Elizabeth Smart, legislative 
representative for the National Women's Chris- 
tian Temperance Union, who will testify in 
support of a bill by Sen. John W. Bricker (R- 
Ohio) for government regulation of the net- 
works, and John H. Battison, general manager 
of KAVE-TV Carlsbad, N. M., who will offer 
testimony on the costs of AT&T interconnec- 
tion and the problems of small market tv sta- 
tion operation. 

One other witness is being considered but 
was not confirmed last week. 

The WCTU's planned testimony in favor of 
the Bricker bill (S 825) is expected to be a 
roundabout method of trying to prohibit liquor 
advertising on radio and tv. Hearings were held 
in February by the Senate and House Com- 
merce Committees on bills (S 923, HR 4627) 
to prohibit liquor advertising in any medium 
[B*T, Feb. 20], but the bills have not been 
reported from the respective committees. 

Industry Comments Oppose 
Proposed Tall Tower Rules 

GENERAL OPPOSITION to the proposed 
"tall tower" rules which would require appli- 
cants for towers above 500 ft. above ground to 
use existing structures or antenna farms — or to 
justify why they can't do so — was expressed 
by several dozen comments filed with the FCC 
on or before July 2. That date had been the 
deadline for comments on the proposed rule 
but last Tuesday the Commission continued 
the deadline to Sept. 3 at the request of WSLA- 
TV Selma, Ala. 

Main objections fell into the following 
categories: 

• No criteria telling where antenna farms 
should be located or whether an applicant had 
made a real effort to locate on an antenna farm 
or existing structure. 

• Unreasonable burden on the applicant to 
force him to justify why he cannot locate on 
an antenna farm or existing structure. 

• Abdication of the FCC's legal duty to 
judge applications in the interest of public 
service and a delegation to the Air Coordinating 
Committee (whose Airspace Panels indicate 
whether a tower is a potential air hazard or 
not) of this function by permitting it to desig- 
nate antenna farms. 

Among other questions raised were: (1) 
whether it was clear that the new rules would 
not affect existing stations which might desire 
to raise the height of their existing antennas, 
and (2) whether stations would be forced to 
share their towers with other broadcasters. 

There were also suggestions that the FCC 
postpone any further action on these rules until 
the Joint Industry-Government Tall Structures 
Committee settled the standards for antenna 
farms. 

NARTB called attention to estimates that 
indicated the cost of a tower supporting two 
antennas was 50% more than for a single 
radiator; for three antennas, 100% more, etc. 
A. Earl Cullum Jr., Dallas consulting engineer, 



termed the proposed rules "dangerously re- 
strictive" to broadcasters. 

Comments were also filed by WGAL-TV 
Lancaster and WLEV-TV Bethlehem, both 
Pa.; NBC; CBS; WDBO-TV Orlando, Fla.; 
WTVH (TV) Peoria, 111.; Meredith stations; 
KRON-TV San Francisco; Storer Broadcasting 
Co.; WIBC Indianapolis, Ind.; WCYL York, 
S. C; Frank G. Kear, Kear & Kennedy, con- 
sulting engineers, Washington, D. C. 

Also KFRE-TV Fresno, Calif.; KTVT (TV) 
Salt Lake City, Utah; KGLO-TV Mason City, 
Iowa; WAFB-TV Baton Rouge, La.; WKJG- 
TV Fort Wayne, Ind.; WKNA-TV Charleston, 
W. Va.; WWJ-TV Detroit, Mich.; WCAU-TV 
Philadelphia, Pa.; WDSU-TV New Orleans, 
La.; WGR-TV Buffalo, N. Y., and RKO Tele- 
radio Pictures Inc. 

The proposed tall tower rules were issued 
last March [B»T, April 2] and followed a year- 
long joint aviation-broadcast-government study 
of tall towers and their apparent threat to air- 
planes. 

Calif. Radio Operator Seeks 
First Tv Translator Grants 

FIRST two applications for the newly author- 
ized tv translator operation were filed with the 
FCC last week, both by James R. Oliver, oper- 
ator of KIBS Bishop, Calif. The new service, 
using uhf channels 70-83 to rebroadcast tv sig- 
nals to remote areas, became effective last 
Monday (July 2), 30 days following the FCC's 
announcement of the promulgation of new rules 
[B*T, May 28]. 

Mr. Oliver asked for two 10-w translator op- 
erations at a location east of Bishop, both to 
use an effective radiated power of 83 w. One 
would be on ch. 70 and would rebroadcast the 
programs of ch. 2 KNXT (TV) Los Angeles; 
the other, on ch. 72 would rebroadcast the ch. 
4 signal of KRCA-TV Los Angeles. Bishop is 
about 225 miles from Los Angeles. 

Mr. Oliver said that 500 people in the Bishop 
area had pledged him their financial support in 
his desire to bring service to the area. Besides 
$7,594 already pledged, the people also have 
pledged voluntary support of $5 per month to 
bear the costs of operation, the application 
said. Mr. Oliver said that as he did not wish 
to make more than costs of operation, volun- 
tary support will be reduced when possible. 
Total construction and first year operation costs 
for both translators were set at $22,650. 

D. C. Time Bill Signed 

A BILL (S 3295) to extend Daylight Saving 
Time in the District of Columbia from the last 
Sunday in September to the last Sunday in 
October — conforming to the time schedules in 
most major eastern cities — was signed into law 
by the President last week after congressional 
approval. The new law (PL 624) was advo- 
cated by Washington area radio-tv stations 
which otherwise would have trouble making 
their network schedules conform to viewing 
hours. 

Fraud Bill Sent to President 

THE House last week passed a Senate-approved 
bill (S 3674) to prohibit fraud by wire, radio or 
tv in foreign as well as interstate commerce. 
Object of amending the law to include foreign 
commerce prohibitions was to prevent use of 
radio-tv and wire communications by fraud- 
ulent stock and other promoters operating from 
Canada, Mexico, etc. The bill now goes to the 
White House for action by the President. 



Commission Makes Grants 
For Seven Daytime Outlets 

CONSTRUCTION permits for seven new day- 
time ams were awarded by the FCC last week. 
Grants went to: 

Little Rock, Ark. — Ebony Radio, 1440 kc, 
1 kw. Sole owner John M. McLendon is 50% 
owner of WNLA Indianola, Miss., 50% of 
WOKJ Jackson, Miss., and general manager of 
WKDL Clarksdale, Miss. 

Madisonville, Ky. — Hopkins County Broad- 
casters, 1310 kc, 500 w. Principals are Evers 
Mick (55%), chief engineer at WFMW-AM- 
FM Madisonville, Ky., and Conway M. Smith 
(45%), chief engineer at WMTA Central City, 
Ky. 

Jonesville, La. — Old South Broadcasting Co., 
1480 kc, 500 w. Old South is owner of WNAT 
Natchez, Miss. 

Holdrege, Neb. — W. W. Broadcasting Co., 
1380 kc, 500 w. Owners are William C. and 
Betty Rae Whitlock. Mr. Whitlock is former 
24% owner of KAWL York, Neb. 

Oneida, N. Y. — John Jacob Geiger, 1600 kc, 
1 kw. Mr. Geiger is program director of 
WAYZ Waynesboro, Pa. 

Salt Lake City, Utah— Dale R. Curtis, 1570 
kc, 500 w. Mr. Curtis holds business interests. 
(Upon consideration of protests to March 8 
grant to Mr. Curtis for 1470 kc, 1 kw, FCC 
designated application for hearing. On May 31 
application was amended to specify present 
facilities, hearing cancelled, protests dismissed 
and application was returned to processing 
line.) 

Chelan, Wash. — Lake Chelan Broadcasting 
Corp., 1220 kc, 1 kw. Lake Chelan owns 
KWNW Wenatchee, Wash. 

Commission Cold on Bids 
For Now-Occupied Channels 

TWO applications seeking tv channels already 
occupied have been returned to the applicants 
by the FCC. The Commission last week re- 
turned applications filed last May for ch. 21 
Louisville, Ky., and ch. 4 Reno, Nev. [B«T, May 
21]. Sarkes-Tarzian Inc. (WTTV [TV] Bloom- 
ington, Ind.) had sought the Louisville channel 
now occupied by WKLO (TV). The latter 
ceased operation in 1954. 

Ettlinger Broadcasting Corp. had sought the 
Reno facility, now held by KAKJ (TV), con- 
tingent upon vacation of grant by permittee 
Robert C. Fisher. An application is pending 
before the FCC for transfer of KAKJ to Tower 
Telecasting Co. (principally KRAM Las Vegas 
interests). 

The Commission has not yet acted on an ap- 
plication by Salem Tv Co. (C. H. Fisher) seek- 
ing Salem, Ore., ch. 3, now occupied by KSLM- 
TV [At Deadline, June 25]. 

WWLP (TV) Satellite Granted 

GRANT of Greenfield, Mass., ch. 58, to Spring- 
field Television Corp., licensee of WWLP (TV) 
Springfield, as a satellite of WWLP was made 
by the FCC last week. Greenfield is about 35 
miles from Springfield, in the north-central part 
of the state. The grant calls for 18.2 kw visual 
and an antenna 500 ft. above average terrain. 
Construction cost is estimated at $50,360 and 
first year operating cost at $90,000. Principal 
owner of ABC-NBC affiliated WWLP are Roger 
L. Putnam (24.55%), William L. Putnam 
(5.35%), George Vadnis (21%), James F. 
Fitzgerald (8.8%). Joseph DeLiso (5.24%) 
andWSPRInc. (Springfield) (8.14%). 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 55 




• KCRA-TV works hard in all media 
to put plenty of promotion back of 
your client in the big Sacramento 
TV market. 

39,788 lines of program advertising 
— nearly 17 full pages — were placed 
by KCRA-TV in 14 newspapers from 
May 8 to June 8. 




10,396,200 Outdoor Poster 
Impressions 




Page 56 • July 9, 1956 



GOVERNMENT 

AWARE Asks Court to Dismiss 
Faulk's $500,000 Libel Suit 

ANSWER was filed last Thursday in New York 
State Supreme Court by AWARE Inc. and Vin- 
cent Hartnett, asking dismissal of a $500,000 
libel suit instituted against them by WCBS New 
York humorist John Henry Faulk [B»T, June 
25]. Mr. Faulk had charged them with con- 
spiring to "blacklist" him from the air on the 
"false" ground of pro-communist associations. 

Laurence A. Johnson, former Syracuse super- 
market operator, who also had been named by 
Mr. Faulk as a party to the suit, is reported to 
be in Europe and did not answer the complaint. 

The answer, submitted by New York attor- 
ney Godfrey P. Schmidt on behalf of AWARE 
and Mr. Hartnett, entered a virtual general de- 
nial of the allegations set forth in Mr. Faulk's 
complaint, and said information contained in 
AWARE bulletins about Mr. Faulk's alleged 
activities was published "without malice toward 
the plaintiff and is accordingly privileged." 

The answer asserted that the defendants 
have "a right, duty and interest in multiplying 
and furthering such anti-communism, in winning 
people back from communism to the cause of 
freedom and in having them clear their own 
names by sincere repudiation of communism 
and communist fronts." It said that "the mat- 
ter complained of was published in the per- 
formance of such duty . . . without malice." 

Accompanying the AWARE-Hartnett verified 
answer was a notice to take testimony from Mr. 
Faulk in New York Supreme Court on July 16. 

Hearing Examiner Backs FCC 
On Pittsburgh Ch. 11 Grant 

AN FCC hearing examiner last week upheld 
the Commission's July 1955 grant of ch. 11 
at Pittsburgh to WWSW Inc. (WIIC [TV]), 
comprised of merged applicants Pittsburgh 
Post-Gazette (WWSW) and WJAS that city. 
In his initial decision, Examiner Hugh B. 
Hutchison also recommended that the FCC 
approve a modification of the WIIC construc- 
tion permit making possible a studio location 
change, increased power and other equipment 
changes. 

The second hearing came about when WENS 
(TV) Pittsburgh (ch. 16), which had tried un- 
successfully to become an applicant for the 
ch. 11 facility after the first hearing, last Octo- 
ber obtained an appellate court order staying 
the grant until the FCC ruled on a WENS peti- 
tion for rehearing. WENS had questioned the 
financial qualifications of WWSW Inc., whether 
ownership changes had taken place in the 
grantee since the merger, overlap and other 
matters. The FCC ordered a rehearing of the 
grant and made WENS a party to the proceed- 
ing [B«T, Dec. 5, 1955]. 

Examiner Hutchison found that the merger 
agreement resulted in no transfer of control 
of WWSW Inc. and that the relationship of 
the merged applicants did not result in a vio- 
lation of FCC policy. He found that there 
would be substantial daytime and some night- 
time overlap between WWSW and WHJB 
Greensburg, owned by WJAS interests, which 
would warrant "careful examination and study" 
should an application be filed for transfer of 
negative control of WWSW Inc. to WJAS in- 
terests. However, the examiner noted that the 
latter stated that WHJB would be sold if over- 
lap considerations would bar the acquisition 
of 50% stock interest in WWSW Inc. 

Mr. Hutchison found that even without the 
sums that would be available to WWSW Inc. 
under the agreement with WJAS, WWSW Inc. 



remained financially qualified to construct and 
operate the proposed station. He found that 
WWSW Inc. would have available $1,950,000 
to meet a total estimated construction cost of 
$1,909,348. 

The examiner also dismissed allegations that 
the grantee had engaged in premature construc- 
tion of the proposed tv station and that a 
change of main studio location had taken place 
contrary to FCC rules. 

Senate Committee Hearings 
Held on Federal Pay Raise 

A SUBCOMMITTEE of the Senate Post Office 
& Civil Service Committee last Thursday heard 
a number of witnesses, many top government 
officials, urge action on measures to increase 
salaries of heads of .government agencies and 
executive departments, including the FCC. 
FCC members did not offer testimony. 

The subcommittee, headed by Sen. Olin D. 
Johnston (D-S. C), chairman of the parent 
committee, is considering a House-passed bill 
(HR 7619) which would raise FCC salaries 
from the present $15,000 to $19,000 and a 
Senate measure (S 2628) which would raise 
the figure to $20,000. 

Not all the witnesses were heard and Sen. 
Johnston said another session will be held this 
week. The bill affects some 600 top echelon 
government officials. 

FCC Stamps Approval 
On WGTH, KLRA Sales 

THE $240,000 sale of WGTH Hartford, Conn., 
and the $162,500 sale of KLRA Little Rock, 
Ark., were among ownership changes approved 
by the FCC last week. 

ABC-MBS-affiliated WGTH was sold by RKO 
Teleradio Pictures to H. Scott Kilgore's Tele- 
Broadcasters of Connecticut Inc. Tele-Broad- 
casters Inc. stations are WARE Ware, Mass., 
WKXL Concord, N. H., WKXV Knoxville, 
Tenn., and KUDL Kansas City, Mo. WGTH, 
on the air since 1935, operates on 1410 kc, with 
5 kw. 

KLRA was sold by Arkansas Gazette to 
Washington (D. C.) country music impresario 
Connie B. Gay, owner of WTCR Ashland, Ky. 
KLRA is affiliated with ABC and has been on 
the air since 1927. It operates on 1010 kc, 
with 1 kw daytime, 5 kw night. 

Tv Set Radiation Danger 
Said 'Greatly Exaggerated' 

STORY by syndicated columnist Drew Pearson 
that the tv industry has hushed up the fact that 
tv sets give off harmful radiation was an over- 
statement of the truth, an industry check in- 
dicates. Mr. Pearson wrote on June 27 that 
black-and-white picture tubes "produce a 'soft' 
X-ray radiation through the face plate." " 'Soft' 
rays," Mr. Pearson explained, "are the worst 
kind." 

An FCC engineer, questioned about Mr. 
Pearson's article, said that all electronic devices, 
including tv sets, generate radiation, but that 
the amount given off is infinitesimal and pre- 
sents no real danger to the viewer. 

At Radio Electronics Television Manufac- 
turers Assn., a spokesman said that Mr. Pear- 
son's article was "greatly exaggerated," that the 
problem of radiation was recognized a long time 
ago and manufacturers have incorporated ample 
safeguards against any possible dangers. To 
his knowledge, the spokesman added, no case 
of harmful effects from tv set radiation has 
ever been reported. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



it's all new . . . 



designed to serve youi 



f 




San Antonio's 



q 

most L 



n n 



Jj Jj J 



n 



I Lj 




stations 



What requirements must a station have to serve 
you? KENS, now located in its new, modern, 
fully equipped building, can give you any tele- 
vision and radio service being offered any- 
where — two gigantic studios with complete 
facilities, network quality montages, "supers", 
split screens, vertical and horizontal wipes (in 
fact, anything being done in television today) 
offering the finest services available to KENS 
and KENS-TV advertisers. 




CBS IN SAN ANTONIO 



KENS-TV 

EXPRESS-NEWS STATION 




SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 57 




WREX-TV 

Q ON TOP 

157 to in 

WREX-TV 
leads in Va 
hour periods 
from 6:00 P.M. 
to midnite 

All 48 of the top 4» 

once-a-week shows are on 
WREX-TV! 

57 of the top 59 

once-a-week shows are on 
WREX-TV! 

All 15 of the top 15 

multi-weekly shows are on 
WREX-TV! 

Facts from the April 1956 ARB 
Survey prove conclusively that 
WREX-TV continues to grow in 
favor with the ever increasing 
number of viewers in this 10 
county billion dollar market! 

WREX-TV 



V 



ROCKFORD • ILLINOIS 

channel 13 



CBS • ABC 
AFFILIATIONS 

represented by 
H-R TELEVISION. INC. 



STATIONS 



CROWELL-COLLI ER SLOWED BUT READY TO GO 



Paperwork delays in filing for 
broadcast properties recounted 
by Smith. Financial history and 
future of C-C also discussed. 

CROWELL-COLLIER Publishing Co. expects 
to be operating its 10 radio-tv stations before 
the end of the year, according to President and 
Editor-in-Chief Paul C. Smith, although the 
firm filed with the FCC only for KFWB Los 
Angeles, its latest acquisition [B«T, June 4]. 
The delay in filing for the other nine stations, 
Mr. Smith said, can be attributed to "unfinished 
paperwork." 

This disclosure was made during a special 
three-hour meeting June 29 with newsmen at 
which Mr. Smith announced the suspension in 
publication of The American Magazine as part 
of the publishing house's streamlining efforts 
[At Deadline, July 2]. The other stations are 
KULA-AM-TV Honolulu, WOOD -AM -TV 
Grand Rapids, WFBM-AM-TV Indianapolis, 
WTCN-AM-TV Minneapolis and WFDF Flint, 
all of which Crowell-Collier purchased within 
a week's time this spring from Television Corp. 
of America and Consolidated Television & 
Radio Broadcasters Inc. for $16 million in stock 
transfers [B»T, April 30 et seq.] 

The "paperwork" alluded to by Mr. Smith 
involves, among other things, remaining stock- 
transfers, the "straightening out of KULA's 
books," full stockholder approval and FCC-re- 
quired citizenship check of Crowell-Collier's 
8,000 shareholders. However, Mr. Smith de- 
clared, "we are racing against time" to meet the 
August recess-date of the Commission in order 
to take approved title to the stations in the 
autumn. 

At the same time, Mr. Smith explained that 
while he and Elroy McCaw, owner of WINS 
New York, had held meetings several times, 
"we couldn't get together on price," and that at 
the present time, there was "nothing doing" in 
regard to Crowell-Collier's reported eyeing of 
WINS as its possible seventh (and last) radio 
station buy. He also declined to say whether 
he had met with Thomas F. O'Neil, president of 
General Teleradio and MBS, to discuss the 
future status of WFDF Flint, an NBC affiliate 
in which Mr. O'Neil is said to be interested. 

Mr. Smtih took occasion during the meeting 
to spell out Crowell-Collier's past and present 



financial position, spending considerable time 
on the "assets-and-liabilities picture" of the firm. 
While the company expects to lose $2 million 
next year on its operation, the total losses of the 
magazine division this year may be reduced 
$1.25 million, due in part to the suspension of 
American and the conversion of its subscription 
lists to the other two magazines. Increased 
advertising rates of 12% and 22% for the 
Woman's Home Companion and Collier's, re- 
spectively, effective next January, and the added 
revenue of the 10 am-tv stations, account for 
C-C hopes to make $4 million net profits next 
year, Mr. Smith said, and a $5 million net profit 
in 1958, "assuming our losses on the magazines 
are held down." As to the possibility that he 
will start a news magazine next year, in lieu of 
American, Mr. Smith had "no comment." 

At the time he assumed Crowell-Collier's 
presidency in January 1954, Mr. Smith declared 
(in reference to the firm's $40 million assets 
and $1 million debt): "I'm up to my ears in 
assets." 

Today, with the publishing house's recent 
acquisition of six radio and four tv stations 
(combined assets: $20 million), total Crowell- 
Collier assets (including its diversified interests 
and properties) stand at $70 million. Mean- 
while, its debts have risen to over $19 million, 
of which approximately $8 million may be 
charged to its two wholly-owned subsidiaries, 
P. F. Collier & Son (books) and American 
Communications Enterprises Inc. (broadcast- 
ing). However, this liability might be reduced 
in 1965 by $3 million, should investors desire 
to redeem their debentures in Crowell-Collier 
common stock (see below). 

In his June 29 news conference, Mr. Smith 
charted the rise of Crowell-Collier's liabilities 
as follows: 

Shortly after becoming president of C-C, Mr. 
Smith realized that the company's $2 million 
cash deficit would not allow him to meet Jan- 
uary's payroll. He therefore took the firm's 
highly-profitable book division, set it up as a 
wholly-owned subsidiary, and on the basis of 
its-then $7 million (now $11 million) assets, 
borrowed $3.5 million from Manhattan's Bank- 
ers Trust and Chemical Corn Exchange banks, 
thus giving him sufficient working capital to last 
through 1954. 
The following year, in order to assume full 




WILLARD SCHROEDER, general manager of WOOD-AM-TV Grand Rapids, Mich., took 
his wife Barbara for a ride in this 1912 Metz during the second annual WOODland 
Antique Automobile tour. The tour was started last year commemorating WOOD's 
30th year of broadcasting [B«T, May 23, 1955]. 



Page 58 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




ORE REACH 



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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 59 




STATION 




CINCINNATI 
OHIO 



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In Cincinnati 



Rex Dale Spends More Time 
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Housewives, than any other 



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On 

"Make Believe Ball Room* " 



10 a.m.-12 Noon; 



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Rex entertains them while he 
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Interstate Bakeries 
Cin'ti Gas b Elec. 
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Pabst Bedding 
Instant Fels 
Clapp's Baby Food 
Kahn's Meats 
Fletcher's Castoria 
L & M Filters 
Wish-Bone Salad Dressing 



Certo Sure Jell 
Imperial Margarine 
Seven-Up 
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Ohio Homes 
Philco 
Kroger Co. 
Milk Dealers 
Canada Dry 
Kool Aid 
Coppertone 
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Phone: Cherry 1-6565 



CHICAGO 

A M Radio Sales 

Jerry Glynn 

400 N. Michigan Ave. 

Phone: Mohawk 4-6555 



SAN FRANCISCO 

A M Radio Sales 

Ken Carey 
607 Market St. 
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Bob Block 

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Phone: Hollyw'd 5-0695 



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FOUR HOURS A DAY • SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 




check these availabilities 



MORNING WATCH 

MUSIC-NEWS-TIME AND THINGS 
With Jay Jones 
6:00 A.M. till 8:55 A.M. 
Monday through Friday 



DON WALLACE SHOW 

TUNES -CHATTER & STUFF 
2:30 P.M. till 3:40 P.M. 
Monday through Friday 



tVIRGIL DOMINIC - NEWS 

Monday through Friday at 
3:00 P.M., 4:00 P.M., 5:00 P.M. 
10:00 P.M. and 11:00 P.M. 



RHYTHM ROUNDUP 

with Frank Berry, "The Best" 
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Lots of Fan Mail. 
Monday through Friday 

10:05 - 11:30 P.M. 

Saturday 
10:15 to 11:30 P.M. 



AVERY-KNODEL 
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James P. Walker 
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control of the company which would permit 
him to, among other things, institute a vigorous 
new "expansion-reorganization-refocusing pro- 
gram," Mr. Smith had to end the control of 
Crowell-Collier by the late Joseph Knapp's 
Publications Corp. He thus approached New 
York investment broker Edward L. Elliott who 
in turn introduced him to a 26-man investor 
group "headed" by Chicago financier J. Patrick 
Lannan. In July 1955, through the Elliott- 
Lannan group, C-C floated a $4 million securi- 
ties issue, of which $3 million were to be in 
new Crowell-Collier debentures, convertible 
(after 10 years) into 600,000 C-C common 
stock at $5 a share. The company also boosted 
stock from 1.7 million to 3 million shares (to 
cover the convertible debentures), and took 
option on half of the 400,000 shares then held 
by the Knapp estate which represented 26% of 
outstanding C-C shares. With stock boosted to 
3 million and 200,000 Knapp shares bought, 
Crowell-Collier whittled down the Knapp 
estate's control to 6.5%. 

This past spring, C-C's debt increased another 
$4.25 million when American Communications 
Enterprises Inc. agreed to take over $3.5 million 
in Consolidated Television & Radio Broad- 
casters obligations, including $2.7 million owed 
by the Bittners to Pittsburgh's Mellon Bank plus 
several large promissary notes. 

On the basis of his strengthened bargaining 
position today, Mr. Smith now intends to borrow 
another $4 million cash from a group of banks 
and investors "on Wall and a few other streets," 
to complete his station purchases and then some 
on the hypoed Crowell-Collier stock. 

WSAI Promotion Gets Credit 
For Naming 5 to All-Stars 

THROUGH the efforts of WSAI Cincinnati, 
the strangest team ever to start an All-Star 
game will represent the National League at 
Washington's Griffith Stadium tomorrow (Tues- 
day). 

In a complete reversal of form that saw all 
eight of last year's senior circuit starters fail 
to make the 1956 team, WSAI was responsible 
for electing five Cincinnati Reds to the first 
team. "Counting all votes for all players at all 
positions, we collected 946,085 votes," reported 
Sherwood Gordon, owner and manager of the 
station. This compares to some 2,800,000 votes 
cast for National League players throughout 
the country. 

"Although we anticipated a good response 
from loyal Cincinnati rooters who follow 
the Redlegs on WSAI, we were completely un- 
prepared for the deluge of votes that flooded 
the station," Mr. Gordon said. 

WSAI plugged the all-star voting every day 
on its Baseball Cavalcade preceding play-by- 
play broadcasts of the Reds' games and by 
Waite Hoyt on the 44-station Burger beer net- 
work for the game broadcasts. Spot announce- 
ments throughout the day also were used, plus 
printed ballots in the station's advertisements 
in the Cincinnati Enquirer. The station distrib- 
uted 105,000 ballots during four days at the 
ball park. "We hammered constantly," accord- 
ing to Mr. Gordon. 

The first batch of WSAI ballots sent to the 
commissioners office attracted the attention of 
Baseball Commissioner Ford Frick because of 
the large number. Mr. Frick sent Dave Grote, 
service director of the National League, to 
WSAI to inspect the balloting procedure. 
"Grote found everything in order. In fact, our 
count was conservative. We were throwing 
away some [ballots] because we couldn't read 
them," Mr. Gordon explained. 




Page 62 • July 9, 1956 



SIGNING for an all-color campaign on 
WWJ-TV Detroit is Adam G. Dunn, presi- 
dent of Cook & Dunn Paint Corp.,New- 
ark, N. J. Also present are Mrs. Elizabeth 
Bowers, the paint company's advertising 
manager, and Otis P. Williams, account 
executive for Peters, Griffin, Woodward, 
which represents WWJ-TV. 

All-Color Campaign Set 
By Paint Firm on WWJ-TV 

CREDIT was claimed last week for what was 
called "the nation's first exclusively all-color 
television spot campaign." The purchase was 
made by Cook & Dunn Paint Corp., Newark, 
N. L, on behalf of its paints, through Halsted 
& Van Vechten Inc., Red Bank, N. J., and 
placed on WWJ-TV Detroit, starting next 
month for five weeks. The contract may be ex- 
tended. 

The sale was disclosed by Peters, Griffin, 
Woodward, Inc., WWJ-TV's representative. 
Otis P. Williams, account executive with the 
representation firm, said the campaign was pur- 
chased solely for color promotion regardless 
of the station's black-and-white tv circulation. 
The drive is "planned and executed with only 
color tv in mind," according to Mr. Williams. 
A special paint dealer promotion in Detroit 
will tie in with the spot series. Commented 
Adam G. Dunn, president of the paint firm, 
"We have pioneered in paint colors through 
the years, and we feel that color tv is the ideal 
way to launch our special color sales drive in 
Detroit." 

The campaign in the station calls for five 
color spots weekly, three one-minutes and two 
ID's. The minutes will be slotted in three 
color programs: Nature Trails, Adventure Ho 
and Hobbies in Action. The ID's will appear 
during NBC Matinee Theatre. The promotion 
is being handled by Robert Kuhn, the agency's 
account executive, and Elizabeth Bowers, ad- 
vertising manager of the paint firm, under the 
direction of Mr. Dunn. 

Conrad Succeeds Kahle 

FRAN CONRAD has been promoted to gen- 
eral manager of KNTV (TV) San Jose, Calif., 
in addition to his duties as national sales man- 
ager, it was announced last week by President 
A. T. Gilliland Sr., upon resignation of Gen- 
eral Manager Douglas D. Kahle. Mr. Conrad 
formerly was consultant to KSBW-TV Salinas 
and director of radio for the ABC Western 
Div. Mr. Kahle, who resigned July 1 because 
of the press of personal business, plans to con- 
tinue his home in San Jose for the present. 
He is also owner of KWIN Ashland, Ore. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 




CO RA 

W J T >-J 




SHARE 

OF 

AUDJEKIC£ 





Of all the awards won by WCCO Radio in its 
31 years of broadcasting (and there' ve been dozens 
ranging from Peabody to what-have-you) , none 
means so much to the advertiser as the 
latest from our listeners. It's a 56.1 per cent share 
of audience, which stands as a national record. 
That's the greatest share captured by any 
station in any of the 27 major markets currently 
measured by the A. C. Nielsen Company! 




More People Listen to WCCO Radio Than All 


Other Minneapolis-St. Paul Stations Combined! 


WCCO Radio. . 


• ••••• 56*1% 






Station C 


8.2% 




8.2% 




7.5% 




10.7% 


Nielsen, March 1956, total station 


audience, total day, 


seven-day week. 




WCCO Radio 

The Northwest's 50,000 Watt Giant 

Minneapolis • St. Paul 
Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 




CONSECUTIVE 
MONTH ON 



WIBG 




DANCELAND 

OVER 3% HOURS 
DAILY 

Pennsylvania's most 
powerful independent 

WIBG 

Q QA I 10,000 
» » W | WATTS 

Phila. 2, Pa. • Rf 6-2300 

Nat'l Representatives — Radio Representatives, Inc. 



STATIONS — — — 

KVOO-TV DEVELOPS COLOR 
USING UNTINTED SLIDES 

Station now transmitting black 
and white IDs and promotions 
in two colors by using its Bicol- 
orimeter unit, built at an ap- 
proximate cost of $5-600. 

THE engineering staff of KVOO-TV Tulsa, un- 
der Chief Engineer John M. Bushnell, has de- 
veloped a system whereby two colors can be 
added to black and white slides without affect- 
ing the black and white quality. 

Named the Bicolorimeter, it has proved most 
successful on slides that do not have more than 
20% shaded gray scale and was built at a cost 
of $5-600. Mr. Bushnell said that color com- 
binations can be altered on order but the basic 
combinations now in use are red highlight with 
cyan background; green highlight with magneta 
background; blue highlight with yellow back- 
ground, and reverse highlight and background 
combinations. 

The Bicolorimeter contains 24V2 inches of 



rack space and is constructed of two genera- 
tors (one sub-carrier), a clipper-keyer-subcar- 
rier adder and a luminace adder. 

Mr. Bushnell pointed out that any station 
can set up its own unit. He said that slides 
which yield the most satisfactory color picture 
avoid shaded gray transition, which causes the 
color change to take place in areas of no de- 
tail and makes the color switch clearly visible 
on black and white sets. Also to be avoided are 
pictures of objects or persons, unless there is 
little shading. 

IDs and program promotion slides are now 
being broadcast in color by KVOO-TV with 
the new system. 

"Actually, this bicolor channel is a biproduct 
of the original goal ... to provide a continuous 
color signal for use by service organizations 
installing color receivers. This has been achieved 
and we have been telecasting a color stripe, 
a narrow band of yellow-green at the left hand 
edge of the picture, since early in June. This 
is transmitted at all times, except during color 
shows, and allows a color receiver to be checked 
for color reception from ch. 2 (KVOO-TV) at 
any time," explained Mr. Bushnell. 



NEW $200,000 STUDIOS FOR KVTV (TV) AND WNAX 




A COMBINATION of modern decor and 
the very latest in electronics communica- 
tion equipment have gone into the new 
$200,000 studios of KVTV (TV) and its 
sister station WNAX (Yankton, S. D.) 
in Sioux City, Iowa. Basically, the stu- 
dios are designed for on-the-air work to 
be handled on the first floor level with 
administrative and executive offices on 
the second floor. Functional interde- 
partmental arrangements provide time 
and step saving efficiency for both pro- 
duction and administrative personnel. 

More than 2,500 sq. ft. of studio space, 
soundproofed with 15-inch thick walls. 



provides settings that range from a city 
living room to a mountain resort, a fully- 
equipped kitchen to a barnyard. 

The 18-ft. ceiling of the studios is 
studded with 126 light outlets which can 
be used singly or all at once. 

Projection of movies, films, slides and 
photos originate in a special room apart 
from the studios, and space has been 
provided for color equipment to be in- 
stalled at a future date. 

Top (1) is a view of control room 
and (r) client's viewing room. Elaborate 
lighting equipment (below) is shown in 
one of the studios. 




Page 64 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




soys Mr. Edgar B. Stern, Jr., President, WDSU-TV, New Orleans, 
as reported in Broadcasting-Telecasting 



Color or black-and-white— the GPL Vari-Focal Lens 
doubles the versatility and usefulness of any camera with 
which it is used. 

As WDSU-TV and many other stations have found, 
with a Vari-Focal Lens you can handle an entire show with 
one camera. In fact you can perform most work ordinarily 
requiring two chains, for the GPL Vari-Focal Lens can 
zoom continuously from a long shot to an extreme close-up 
without disturbing pick-up continuity or camera orienta- 
tion. Speed of full zoom is variable from 2 to 30 seconds. 

The Vari-Focal Lens is completely color-corrected, 
and fits all monochrome and color image-orthicon cameras. 

Equally useful in studio and field, the GPL Vari-Focal 
Lens has a focal range nearly twice that of any other lens 
in the industry. It can make a 10:1 change in focal length 



in two 5:1 steps— from 3" to 15" and 6" to 30". Once the 
camera is focused, the object remains sharp, including 
corners, as the focal length is varied. 

Silently motor-driven, the lens can be operated from 
camera or control room. A new feature, manual focus con- 
trol, is now available. With this control, located at the 
cameraman's fingertips, changes in focal plane can be made 
by simple turns of the knob. 

And, of course, the GPL Vari-Focal Lens has same 
standard of resolution as high-quality camera lenses of fixed 
focal length. Its field is flat over the entire range. 

No wonder the GPL Vari-Focal Lens is used by pro- 
gressive stations all over the country. They know that there 
is no more effective way to multiply the usefulness of their 
camera equipment. 



All three of the big TV networks have multiple installations 

Find out for yourself just how versatile a TV camera can be— write or phone us for full 
information or a demonstration of the GPL Vari-Focal Lens. 



GST3L 



GENERAL PRECISION LABORATORY INCORPORATED 

Pleasantville, New York 



A SUBSIDIARY OF GENERAL PRECISION EQUIPMENT CORPORATION 




Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 65 




ON THE DOTTED LINE 



LUBY CHEVROLET, Miami, has signed to 
sponsor 13 Saturday night movies on 
WCKT (TV) that city as the station pre- 
pares to go on the air. Completing the 
deal are (I to r) Sam Luby, owner of the 
sponsoring Chevrolet agency; Lee Spence, 
Luby general manager; Ed Bultman, WCKT 
account executive, and Bob Fidlar, the 
station's sales manager. 




THE Puritan Laundry & Dry Cleaning 
Co., Omaha, Neb., has renewed Circle 
3 Ranch on KMTV (TV) that city for 13 
weeks. Puritan officials say that business 
has shown a "considerable increase" 
since the firm started sponsoring the 
Sunday morning 8-9 a.m. program 14 
weeks ago. Present for the renewal sign- 
ing are (I to r) Jim Lipsey, Universal Ad- 
vertising Agency, Omaha, Puritan agency 
Puritan President William P. Garvey, and 
Arden Swisher, KMTV general sales 
manager. 





SCUDDER FOOD PRODUCTS Inc., Los Angeles, has signed to sponsor the Kit Carson 
series on KABC-TV there. Present for the contract signing are (I to r): seated, Ralph 
Pansek, Scudder advertising manager; Bill Williams, star of the tv series; standing, Lee 
Siteman, Mottl & Siteman advertising agency; Paul Kennedy, KABC-TV account execu- 
tive; Colburn Hull, Scudder sales manager; Ed Baltz, Mottl & Siteman, and Selig J. 
Seligman, KABC-TV general manager. 





A 52-WEEK CONTRACT for the / Search 
for Adventure series on KCCC-TV Sacra- 
mento is signed by Keith Anderson, owner 
of Handy Andy Tv & Appliances in that 
city. With him is Jerry Cronan, KCCC-TV 
account executive. 



THE Bechtel Corp., San Francisco engi- 
neering and construction firm, is sponsor- 
ing five half hours of music each week 
on KNBC-FM San Francisco to advertise 
for engineers, draftsmen and other tech- 
nical personnel. M. E. Cyester, Bechtel 
personnel manager, signs for the spon- 
sorship as KNBC-FM account executive 
Wayne R. Anderson looks on. 

SAM RABIN, president, Biggie Furniture 
store, San Francisco, signs for the Biggie 
Jamboree, a one-hour live western show 
on ABC-owned KGO-TV that city. Tak- 
ing part in the signing (I to r): James H. 
Connolly, ABC vice president and KGO- 
TV general manager; Ad Fried of the 

San Francisco agency bearing his 
m name, representing Biggie, and Heinz 

Block, Biggie general manager. 




SUZANNE R. WELLS, president of Man- 
agement Associates of Connecticut, agen- 
cy for Slenderella, signs a 52-week re- 
newal contract for Women's News Desk, 
featuring Ruth Ashton, on the Columbia 
Pacific Radio Network. Also present at 
the signing are (1) Fulton Wilkins, eastern 
sales representative for KNX Los Angeles 
and the network, and Gordon F. Hayes, 
general manager of CBS Radio Spot Sales. 



Page 66 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



■ STATIONS • 



Uninterrupted Music Basis 
For WOR Evening Program 

WOR New York is set to introduce today 
(Monday) a concept of evening programming 
under which music will be presented uninter- 
rupted Monday through Saturday from 9:05 
p.m. to 1 a.m. EDT, with commercial an- 
nouncements only on the hour and half-hour, 
and on Sunday from 11:30 to 5 p.m. EDT. 
Mutual affiliates are being offered a portion 
of the program. 

The programming, called Music From Studio 
X, will originate in a new studio incorporating 
the latest in high-fidelity facilities and acousti- 
cal materials, according to Robert J. Leder, 
WOR's vice president and general manager. 
He said a special high-fidelity line, direct from 
Studio X to the WOR transmitter in Carteret, 
N. J., has been established. 

Mr. Leder reported that the programming 
is being made available to Mutual affiliates 
and that about 100 stations already have in- 
dicated they will carry it from 10 p.m. to 12 
midnight. WOR already has sold announce- 
ments amounting to $1,000 a week to Harvey 
Radio Co., New York, for a six-week test 
campaign, according to Mr. Leder. MBS 
affiliates carrying the program may sell it on 
a local basis. 

Lyell Bremser Appointed 
Manager of KFAB Omaha 

LYELL BREMSER has been appointed general 
manager of KFAB Omaha, replacing Harry 

Burke, whose resig- 
nation was an- 
nounced last week 
[B«T, July 2]. 

Mr Bremser, who 
has been with the 
station 17 • years in 
various capacities, 
was program direc- 
tor at the time of 
his new appoint- 
ment. 

George Haskell, 
formerly public serv- 
ice director for the 
station, has been 
made assistant to the manager, and Ken Head- 
rick has been named program director. 





MR. BREMSER 



One Language 

DESEGREGATION of race and foreign 
language programming within 60 days 
has been announced by KDAY Santa 
Monica, Calif., as the result of surveys 
showing a high integration of all national 
and racial elements in the greater Los 
Angeles market over the past several 
years. KDAY will cancel its time-bro- 
kerage shows in Japanese, Hungarian, 
Greek, Scandinavian, German, Lithua- 
nian and Armenian as well as Spanish- 
language and specifically Negro shows. 
New emphasis will be on general audience 
appeal, although the station will retain 
Negro disc jockey Joe Adams and Latin 
Chico Sesma, who have all audience 
popularity, KDAY General Manager 
George Baron said. 



hat makes loiumbus A market r 





For greater coverage . . . it's WBNS-TV . . . number 1 
Station in the Columbus market ... a market offering great 
effective buying income from "plus" population segments 
such as Lockbourne Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, and 
many progressive industries and neighboring farm communities. 

Statistics on Lockbourne Air Force Base show: 

a. Millions of dollars spent in Columbus each year 
for Base construction, food, supplies and sundries. 

b. Personnel of 6,436 . . . with a high percentage 
living off the base, in homes of their own. 

c. Monthly payroll averaging approximately 2 
million dollars. 

Due to its high percentage of tune-in . . . WBNS-TV's 
commercials vitally affect the purchasing selections of this 
group, as well as the total WBNS-TV coverage 
area. 



Lockbourne Air Force Base is important 
to Columbus . . . and WBNS-TV is important 
to you in reaching this "Plus" market. 



Photo graph courtesy of 
Lockbourne Air Force 
Base, Strategic Air Com- 
mand,depicting a RB-47 Jet 
Bomber being refueled by 
tanker aircraft, both Lock- 
bourne-based . . . a familiar 
sight in mid-Ohio skies. 



Number 2 in "Columbus Market" Series. 



WBNS-TV 
COVERAGE FACTS 

TOTAL POPULATION 

1,872,900 
TOTAL FAMILIES 

556,000 
TOTAL TV HOMES 

500,400 
iR45.2% average 
tune-in in this 3 
station market. 
Jfcl 4 out of 1 5 Top 
once-a-week 
shows. 

*9 out of 1 Top 
multi - weekly 
shows. 

(Source Columbus 
Telepulse May 1956) 



WBNS 




REPRESENTED BY BLAIR TV. 



channel 10 • columbus, ohio 

CBS-TV Network . . . Affiliated with Columbus Dispatch. General Sales Office: 33 N High St. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 67 




No more potent salesman in the Baton 
Rouge trade area than WAFB-TV . . . 
"The Champ" when it comes to Rat- 
ing, and "The Champ" when it comes 
to merchandising. 

WAFB-TV's rating leadership is 
nearly 5-to-l. WAFB-TV's merchan- 
dising leadership is unsurpassed. 
For example: 

ROUND 1 

First place winner in "Lucy 
Show" competition with a 
double first prize for special 
merchandising job. 

ROUND 2 

First place in Screen Gems, 
Inc. contest on program 
promotion. 

ROUND 3 

Finished in "top four" in pro- 
motion contest sponsored 
by "Frank Leahy and His 
Football Forecasts." 

ROUND 4 

WAFB-TV's only entry was 
I- second place winnerin 1 956 
Billboard promotion contest 
for "network programs." 





WAFB-TV 



CBS- ABC 



CHANNEL 28 

Affiliated with 
WAFB AM- FM 

200,000 WATTS 



STATIONS 



Dane* full Adorn Young, National or Clarke 
Brown in South ond Southwast 



Page 68 • July 9, 1956 




Munkhof New WFRV-TV G.M., 
Will Head Expansion Plans 

SOREN H. MUNKHOF, tv consultant and for- 
mer general manager of WREX-TV Rockford, 
111., has been named vice president and gen- 
eral manager of WFRV-TV Green Bay, Wis., 

according to Clayton 
Ewing, WFRV-TV 
president. Mr. Munk- 
hof will have the 
added responsibility 
of planning a new 
$500,000 office and 
studio building and 
an overall station ex- 
pansion program. 

Mr. Munkhof has 
a long background in 
the communications 
industry, including 
MR. MUNKHOF newspaper, advertis- 

ing agency and 20 
years in broadcasting. He also has headed the 
staff of WOW-TV and designed and supervised 
the construction of its studios, plus studios for 
WREX-TV and two Milwaukee stations. He 
replaces Don C. Wirth, who continues as man- 
ager of WNAM Neenah, Wis., WFRV-TV's 
am affiliate. 

WFRV-TV expansion plans call for the 
erection of a studio building in downtown 
Green Bay and a new transmitter building 
southeast of DePere, Wis., both planned for 
a fall completion, plus an overall staff increase. 
The downtown building will have all facilities 
on one floor and features a 42x65 ft. studio. 

Stations Get Quick Details 
On Grand Canyon Disaster 

RADIO and tv stations across the country were 
quick to relay details of the double air dis- 
aster in Grand Canyon Saturday, June 30. Re- 
porting early to B*T on coverage were KRUX 
Phoenix, Ariz., and WWDC Washington. 

KRUX within minutes of the first report 
aired recorded telephone interviews with Civil 
Aeronautics Authority control in Los Angeles, 
and with government park rangers in northern 
Arizona. The KRUX news plane provided 
first definite location of the downed United 
airliner, the station says. The air team and 
mobile unit originated 31 on-the-scene reports 
in a 24-hour period, with several carried on 
the United Press wire. 

WWDC Washington got quick coverage from 
Ross E. Beville, engineering vice president, who 
was vacationing in Grand Canyon at the time. 
He fed the story by beeper phone back to 
WWDC and reported observations from a 
ranger station using a powerful telescope there. 
His feeds were used Saturday, Sunday and 
Monday. 



Authors Book on Trains 

JACK R. WAGNER, program manager 
at KNBC San Francisco, is author of a 
newly-published book based on a long- 
time hobby — the study of picturesque 
small railroads in California and Nevada. 

The 266-page volume, entitled Short 
Line Junction, tells the story of seven 
small, independent railroads and features 
nearly 250 historic photographs. It is 
published by Academy Literary Guild. 



Civil Question 

A QUESTION put by Ralph Hess, presi- 
dent and general manager of WFAI 
Fayetteville, N. C, to Col. T. G. Ker- 
shaw, commander of the 464th Troop 
Carrier Wing, Pope Air Force Base, Fort 
Bragg, N. C, has resulted in a two-day 
"Exercise Broadcaster" program set for 
July 17-18. 

Mr. Hess' question, one that Col. Ker- 
shaw says "isn't extended very often" in 
his line of business was "What can we, 
as radio men, do toward better public 
understanding of the military within our 
communities?" The Air Force reply was 
an invitation to North Carolina broad- 
casters to have a firsthand look at an 
airborne operation, to stay on Pope Air 
Force Base overnight, ride along with 
troopers in C-119 Flying Boxcars to ob- 
serve parachutists and heavy equipment 
drops. The Air Force is providing six 
short feature tapes made in advance and 
which WFAI will dub for individual 
broadcasters. 




MR. ESHLEMAN 



Petry Names E. E. Eshleman 
Eastern Radio Sales Manager 

AS another step in the expansion plans of the 
radio division of Edward Petry & Co., station 

representatives, Wil- 
liam B. Maillefert, 
vice president and 
radio general man- 
ager, last week an- 
nounced the promo- 
tion of E. E. (Jim) 
Eshleman Jr. to the 
post of eastern radio 
sales manager. The 
Petry organiza- 
tion recently moved 
to larger quarters in 
New York and an- 
nounced several ap- 
pointments in radio 
sales and promotion [B«T, July 2]. 

Mr. Eshleman has been a salesman in Petry's 
television division for the past two years. Pre- 
viously, he had been in various sales capacities 
with WGAL Lancaster, Pa., and with the Stein- 
man Stations. 

KDAY Santa Monica Adds 

AL SCHAEFFER, sales manager of KDAY 
Santa Monica, Calif., Thursday announced ap- 
pointment of a new sales staff including Bill 
Beals, assistant sales manager, who formerly 
was with KABC Los Angeles. 

Other new KDAY account executives are 
Evans Jim Powell, previously with KGIL San 
Fernando, Calif., and KVOA Tucson; Larry 
Grannis, formerly with KGFJ Los Angeles, 
and Bob Hinds, Foster & Kleiser, Los Angeles 
outdoor agency. Louise Sanders, formerly with 
the Southern California Broadcasters Assn., has 
been named to handle sales service and sales 
promotion. KDAY has established temporary 
sales office at 8301 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
adjacent to the site of the station's new studio 
building now under construction. Temporary 
phone is Hollywood 9-5409. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 




Will you have 



higher power tomorrow?, 



If you are 250 watts today, your future may hold 
500 or 1O0O watts. Gates is looking to that future 
too! Broadcasting's newest 250 watt transmitter, 
the "Hl-Watter" BC-25QL, is actually a modified 
1000 watt transmitter — all ready to go up in 
power to 500 or 1O00 watts. Conversion takes 
2 hours' time. Even chassis are drilled for the 
larger components, wiring is in place — everything 
is in readiness. 



Best of all, there is no premium cost when in- 
creasing power. Example: Take the 250 watt 
cost, add higher power conversion parts and total 
is the regular selling price of the higher powered 
model. Only extra cost is tubes you have already 
expended. 



Why not own the only 250 watt transmitter that 
is built like a kilowatter because basically it is a 
kilowatter? You will be pleased with the low cost 
and your investment is secure for tomorrow too. 
—May we mall you a descriptive brochure or 
better yet, a Gates sales engineer will gladly 
call to tell you more. 






★ 




GATES BC-250 HI-WATTER, features all frequency 540-1600 Kc. 
tuning as supplied — Conelrad at no extra cost; center line 4 meter- 
ing; twin drive low distortion audio system; full Tee network output 
coupling for low spurious radiation; complete relay system for easy 
adaption to remote control; variable coil tank and output tuning 
(no variable condensers). May be increased in power to 500 or 
1000 watts in 2 hours' time. Price, $2995.00 with tubes and crystal. 
Conversion material for 500 watts, $1048.00 including tubes. Con- 
version material for 1000 watts, $1598.00 including tubes. 



GATES RADIO COMPANY, QUINCY, ILL, U. S. A. 



Atlanta, Ga., 1133 Spring St., N. W. 
Houston, Texas, 2700 Polk Ave. 



Los Angeles, 7501 Sunset Blvd. 



New York City, 51 E. 42nd St. 



Washington, 13th & E Sts. ! 



Montreal, Canadian Marconi Co. 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 



Page 69 





It's easy — and 
perfectly legal. 
Because we're 
talking about 
that big jury of 
Americans who render judg- 
ments on product brands. 

Let PUBLIC DEFENDER 
swing this jury to your product 
label. For the many millions who 
make REED HADLEY in PUB- 
LIC DEFENDER a "must see" 
habit on TV also make the 
brands he promotes a "must 
buy" habit. 

REED HADLEY 
starring in 
"PUBLIC 
DEFENDER" 

69 HALF HOURS 

First run in many markets! 
Powerful re-run value in 
ALL markets! 



^iterstate 

TELEVISION CORPORATION 



NEW YORK 

445 Park Ave. 
MUrray Hill 8-2545 



CHICAGO 

1250 S. Wabash 
WAbash 2-7937 



HOLLYWOOD 

4376 Sunset Drive 
NOrmandy 2-9181 



■ STATIONS 



Three Broadcasters Bid 
For Detroit Baseball Co. 

THREE broadcast interests have submitted bids 
for purchase of Detroit Baseball Co., operating 
the Detroit Tigers team and Briggs Stadium. 
George B. Storer, with Charles O. Finley and 
other interests, submitted a bid. Mr. Storer 
operates the Storer Broadcasting Co. station 
group. • , 

John E. Fetzer, WKZO-AM-TV Kalmazoo, 
Mich., and other stations, teamed with Fred 
Knorr, WKMH Dearborn-Detroit, in a syndi- 
cate understood to have backing of other Michi- 
gan interests. Harold Gross, WJIM-AM-TV 
Lansing, Mich., was the third broadcast bidder. 

Eight bids were submitted, with figures es- 
timated between $4 and $5.5 million. The top 
three bids, it is understood, will be submitted 
to Ford Frick, baseball commissioner, and Wil- 
liam Harridge, American League president, for 
approval. Announcement of the successful 
bidder is to be made by July 31. 

Richard T. Allen to Head 
New Department at Pearson 

A NEW business development and sales promo- 
tion department has been established at the John 
E. Pearson Co. and John E. Pearson Tv, New 

York, station repre- 
sentatives, to be de- 
voted directly to ad- 
vertising clients and 
their agencies. 

One of the first 
projects that the new 
department will 
undertake is a com- 
plete study of the 
Negro market, a 
breakdown on its 
buying power in 
major cities, with 
such details as pop- 
ulation, where cen- 




MR. ALLEN 



tered and what and how much is purchased. 
The study will be made in conjunction with 
Samuel Fitzsimmons of New York, a special 
consultant. It will be directed entirely at the 
client level, working with and through media 
directors of the advertisers and their agencies. 

Heading the new JEPCO department is Rich- 
ard Thomas Allen, formerly with the station 
relations department of Radio Advertising 
Bureau. 

The activity of the new division in sales 
promotion is expected to be of assistance to 
each of JEPCO's salesmen and its stations as 
well as to advertisers and agencies. 



Coverage by Sketch 

COVERAGE of a major murder trial by 
television — despite a Canon 35 ban on 
cameras — was accomplished by KOLN- 
TV Lincoln, Neb., through the use of an 
artist's sketches. 

Robert Regler, the station's staff artist, 
made more than 100 sketches of court- 
room personalities, scenes and action of 
the Darrel Parker murder trial. The 
sketches were used in regular newscasts 
during the three weeks the trial was in 
session. 




THIS PLAQUE marks the Paul W. White 
Memorial Exhibit at the San Diego Zoo. 
It lists the names of the friends of Mr. 
White who made the exhibit possible. 

Paul W. White Memorial 
Dedicated at San Diego Zoo 

A NEW EXHIBIT was opened yesterday (Sun- 
day) at the San Diego Zoo in memory of the 
late Paul W. White, well-known radio news 
personality and ardent friend of the zoo. The 
exhibit features six Tasmanian Devils. 

It was Mr. White's request before his death 
July 9, 1955, that no flowers be sent to his 
funeral, but that his friends donate money 
intended for this purpose to the zoo. The 
exhibit therefore was made possible by money 
contributed by friends of Mr. White, many of 
whom are in the broadcast industry. 

Mr. White served with United Press, CBS, 
KFMB San Diego, San Diego Journal and 
taught at Columbia U., Iowa State U. and 
San Diego State College. Dedication cere- 
monies were telecast on the Zoorama program 
by KFMB-TV San Diego. 

Quaal Counsels Discretion 
In WGN-TV Festival Speech 

WARD QUAAL, soon to take over the mana- 
gerial reins of WGN and WGN-TV Chicago, 
appeared at the WGN-TV Fifth Annual Film 
Festival and Talent Parade Thursday and in 
speech took account of attacks on radio-tv which 
have become "a national pastime." 

The speaker, who leaves his job as executive 
vice president and general manager of Crosle> 
Broadcasting Co. to join WGN Inc. August 1 
noted that "we are today the subject of the 
closest scrutiny in numerous quarters." Acknowl 
edging that some charges have merit, others 
he said, are "not only wholly without founda- 
tion; they are, in my opinion, most insincere. 
"Unless we perform on the highest plane," h< 
counselled, "we are inviting government con 
trol of programming and government establish 
ment of rates." 

The one-day festival, attended by nearly 30( 
agency, film and industry representatives, fea 
tured previews of fall attractions by film pro- 
ducers and distributors and a presentation o: 
live talent. 



Page 70 • My 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecastinc 



'I read Ad Age — front 
to back — every week" 



says R. M. GRAY 
Advertising Manager 
Esso Standard Oil Company 



"I read Advertising Age regularly, every week. My 
copy reaches home on Monday, and I usually 
read it after dinner Monday nights, front page to 
back page, thoroughly. In addition to news 
of the business, its features are valuable, too." 




R. M. GRAY 

Mr. Gray's 22 years with Esso Standard covers exten- 
sive experience in planning and handling advertising 
campaigns, sales campaigns, creative work, buying 
space and time in all media. His background prior to 
joining Esso was in advertising agency work, which 
included market research, writing and contact work 
on many merchandise lines. 

The outside organizations in which he has officiated 
reads like a "Whos Who" of American business 
organizations — Advertising Federation of America; 
Assn. of Natl. Advertisers (radio-tv committee) ; 
Advertising Club of N. Y.; The Advertising Council 
— just to name a few. He has been an active member 
of many petroleum industry committees, and cur- 
rently acts as adviser to the Oil Heat promotion group. 



Front page to back page — regularly every week — only in Ad Age will you find the concentrated atten- 
tion of most sales, advertising and marketing executives who are important to you. Keeping up with 
marketing news, trends and developments through the unique weekly coverage of AA ranks high with 
most men who have voices in important market decisions — not only to those who activate, but to those 
who influence these decisions. 

Esso Standard, for example, has long ranked among major broadcast advertisers. With a total advertis- 
ing budget running between $10-12 million for 1956, its expenditures for tv spots alone for the first 
quarter of 1956 are estimated at $531,500.* With its new "Golden Esso Extra" gasoline being intro- 
duced in Esso's 18-state area, with broadcast being used to help promote Esso's safety campaign 
and carry Esso's new public relations messages, the outlook is for an even greater prominence in 
broadcast media. 

Every year, 104 issues of Ad Age get "front to back" readership among important executives at Esso 
Standard. Further, 8,944 paid subscription copies a year — 172 every week — get AA's brand of reader- 
ship at McCann-Erickson, the agency handling Esso's advertising. 

Add to this AA's similar penetration of advertising agencies with a weekly paid circulation of almost 
9,000, its intense readership by top executives in national advertising companies, its unmatched total 
readership of over 120,000 based on 32,500 paid subscriptions, and 
you'll recognize in Advertising Age, a most influential medium 
for swinging broadcast decisions your way in 1956. 

N. C. Rorabaugh Estimate for 
Television Bureau of Advertising 



200 EAST ILLINOIS STREET • CHICAGO 1 1 



ILLINOIS 



7 Year (52 issues) $3 




Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 



Page 71 



STATIONS 



REPORT ON MULTIPLEXING, 
FROM A MAN WHO RUNS ONE 



THIS is a personal report from one of the few 
fm operations in the country operating on a 
100 percent multiplex basis. It was written by 
Tom Wallace Jr., chief engineer of KTKT-FM 
Tucson, Ariz., who spells out in dollars and 
cents what the advent of this new broadcast 
technique has meant to his station. 

IN MARCH of 1955 the FCC approved the 
use of sub-carriers on fm stations and opened 
the multiplexing door for fm broadcasters. 
The new ruling was met with mixed emotions 
— from wild optimism to intense indifference. 

It met strong opposition from the so-called 
"beepers" or simplex operators who were using 
their main fm carriers to distribute music and 
supplying their customers with fm receivers 
which would respond to a "beep" supersonic 
tone thereby muting the receivers during com- 
mercials or talk of any kind including station 
identification. The obvious reason for the 
fight from the simplex operators was the por- 
tion of the rule-making that gave them only 
one year to start multiplexing or cease their 
background music operation. Since a number 
of them were also "storecasting" and using 
several tones to control the various receivers 
selectively, the technical problems of conver- 
sion to multiplexing appeared insurmountable. 

The demonstrations put on at the NARTB 
convention in Washington the following May 
[1955] did nothing to pacify these fears. The 
two manufacturers of the equipment were 
quoting delivery dates and taking what orders 
they could, but no one was really convinced 
that the idea was as workable in practice as 
it looked on paper. There was no demonstra- 
tion at the convention that would have con- 
vinced any broadcaster that this field was a 
good place to invest $10-$15,000. Things 
looked pretty grim and the fms went home 
still trying to figure out a way to make fm pay. 

In March of 1956 (eight months overdue) 
the first equipment was delivered to KTKT in 
Tucson and the installation was made. After 
six weeks of adjusting and making changes, 
the first commercial receiver installation was 
made. Now after three months of operation 
with receivers that have been revised three 
times, we can say that multiplexing is here io 
stay and we are making money. Here's how: 

Where to Sell 

In the first place the simplest and fastest 
way to start making multiplexing pay is to sell 
a music service to local businesses. No one 
will argue the feasibility of selling music. 
Musak has been doing very well at it for some 
years with phone lines. The value to the mer- 
chant and to the employer as both a customer 
and employe relations aid has been proven 
beyond a doubt and Muzak, we think, would 
be the first to admit that multiplexing is both 
more economical and more satisfactory than 
phone lines . . . if it works properly! Well, it 
does. 

We have placed receivers all over this valley 
both near and far. We have receivers down- 
town, way out in the boon-docks, and right 
under the transmitting antenna. We cannot say 
truthfully that we have not had our problems. 
But we can say that the problems we have had 
have not been insurmountable or for that 
matter even serious. When we follow the man- 
ufacturer's recommended installation technique 
and normal sound engineering practices in 
both transmitting and receiving we have yet to 



fail to make a satisfactory installation. 

We have found the businessmen of Tucson 
both interested and enthusiastic about a music 
service that can be delivered at the low cost 
made possible by multiplexing. And we are 
convinced that low cost is the key that opens 
the door to large volume and that large volume 
is the secret to making money with multiplex- 
ing as it has been in every other form of this 
business of ours. Our sales have been limited 
only by the amount of time that our sales force 
has had to make contacts. We are setting up 
a separate sales force for the multiplex end of 
our business. 

If you want figures, here they are. We charge 
a base rate of $14.90 per month plus 50 cents 
per speaker per month if the customer owns 
his own sound system. If the customer wishes 
to lease speakers and amplifiers from us we 
charge $14.90 plus $2.50 per speaker including 
amplifier. If the customer wishes to buy his 
sound installation we will give him a competi- 
tive bid on such an installation. 

Our average customer pays us about $17.50 
per month for music service. Very few, so 
far, have wanted to lease equipment. More 
than half of them have already had a sound 
system of one sort or another. We have sold 
about 25% of them a sound system to go with 

their music. We take 
the responsibility of 
maintaining the mu- 
sic receiver and any 
sound equipment that 
we lease. We charge 
from $10-25 to in- 
stall a receiver, 
which is a little more 
than our cost. 

Now about costs. 
We depreciate our 
receivers (which cost 
us $94.50 each) over 
a period of three 
years. This breaks 
down to $2.63 per month, plus interest if you 
finance the purchase, so call it roughly $3.15 
per month at 6% whether it's your money or 
someone else's. 

Our transmission equipment cost us roughly 
$5,000, including new exciter-modulator, sub- 
carrier generator-monitor, and associated gear 
such as tape machine, rack space, engineering 
time, etc. We expect to have about 100 instal- 
lations by the end of the summer so let's base 
the monthly cost of this fixed expense on that 
figure. If you also depreciate this gear at 
three years (it really should be five) and add 
interest of 6%, it comes to $1.63 per account 
per month. 

We set aside $2.50 per month for music 
rights. Since the customer never owns the 
receiver the maintenance problems are sim- 
plified because we merely replace the defective 
receiver with a good one and then fix it at 
our shop. This eliminates the expense of hav- 
ing a trained, skilled man make the service 
calls. We set aside $1 per month per receiver 
for maintenance. If this seems low to you 
don't let it fool you. With the receivers we 
are using we have not had enough trouble to 
reach this figure. Further experience may 
prove otherwise, but we think the chances of 
that are very small now. 

We are paying a sales commission of 15%, 
which comes to roughly $2.25 per month per 
account. 




MR. WAUACE 



Since we operate practically automatically 
with the 8-hour tape machine and on an fm 
station that was going to be on the air anyway, 
we don't charge any of the existing operating 
salaries or overhead to multiplex. Yet! 

We pay for our taped music at the rate of 
$75 per month plus $1 per account, so we'll 
call that item $1.75 per month per account 
based on 100 receivers. 

This comes to $12.28 per month per account 
and leaves us a gross profit of about $5 per 
month per account. This may not seem like 
much and if 100 accounts is all you think you 
can get out of your market, it isn't. We have 
a fast-growing market of nearly 200,000 to 
serve and feel like 1,500 accounts is not too 
much to expect in the years to come. 

The receivers and transmitting gear should 
last well beyond the three years we have 
figured them for. A fair estimate would be be- 
tween five and 10 years. Most of the people 
who read this article have radios at home that 
are still working after 10 years of service. 
And those radios were not nearly as well made 
as the receivers we are using. 

Now, let's examine what else we can do 
with our multiplexing equipment to make an 
honest dollar. We now have a 2-channel multi- 
plex transmitter and can buy a 3-channel trans- 
mitter if we wish. (Yes, they are available now.) 
We can use the extra channels for the following: 

Storecasting: This is a solid and established 
business in some cities. Sending music and 
commercials directed at the shopper while 
she is shopping is becoming very attractive to 
the national advertiser. If a store doesn't carry 
the merchandise that you are selling in a par- 
ticular commercial, then you can cut out the 
receiver in that store or series of stores while 
that commercial is on the air. There are too 
many storecasting plans to discuss in this 
article, but the most common way seems to be 
to charge the market or drug store a nominal 
fee for the use of the receiver and then share 
the advertising dollar with it. The theory- 
being that if a store is paying for the service 
and at the same time receiving a share in the 
benefits of the advertising dollar it is not 
likely to turn the receiver off. 

Another Approach 

Another offshoot of storecasting that hasn't 
been tried yet, but looks awfully good, is 
liquor store casting. Hard liquor manufactur- 
ers have a lot of advertising money and are 
tied hand and foot in the ways that they 
cannot spend it. In most states they can't 
give premiums or gifts or bonuses. They can- 
not use radio or tv and they are limited severe- 
ly in the amount of point-of-sale that they can 
use, both by law and by the simple space 
limitations in the average liquor store. 

The liquor people we have talked to have 
accepted the idea very enthusiastically. And 
we have asked the Arizona State Board of 
Liquor control if they have any objections. 
They don't, they say, if the liquor stores pay 
something for the service. Well, that's easy. 
How about a dollar month? Since the FCC 
has classified multiplexing as a non-broadcast 
service, it appears they will go along. 

And then there are others, such as controlling 
traffic signals with multiplex to solve some of 
the rush hour traffic headaches in almost any 
city of over 50,000. How about sending tele- 
type and facsimile? How's your imagination? 
The sky's the limit, because what multiplexing 
amounts to is a tremendous expansion of the 
RF spectrum, a signed blank check to the fm 
broadcasters who have the imagination and 
the far-sightedness to use it for something that 
will benefit both themselves and the communi- 
ties they serve. 



Page 72 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting 



Telf^asting 



It was 



IDECO towers. 




GROWTH OF 
A STATION 

JOB DATA: 

Station WISH began 
operation in 1941 with 
two 470-ft. Ideco radio 
towers. Ideco converted 
one of these towers for 
a TV antenna in 1954. 
In May 1955, Ideco 
completed the new 
1,000-ft. tower from 
which WISH-TV now 
operates. 



With station after station it has been the same story 
of SATISFACTION in Ideco. Satisfaction with the 
service during planning, erection and inspection 
of every Ideco tower. Satisfaction with perfect 
towec performance resulting from Ideco's sound 
engineering and exacting fabrication. Satisfaction 
from the long service life and low maintenance 
cost recorded by Ideco towers. 

That's a reputation of dependability you can 
trust! So, for your next tower, call on Ideco . . . 
your complete satisfaction is assured. Write Ideco, 
or contact your nearest RCA Broadcast Equipment 
representative. 




DRESSER- IDECO COMPANY 

One of the DRESSER INDUSTRIES 
COLUMBUS 8, OHIO 

Branch: 8909 S. Vermont Ave., LoS' Angeles 44, Calif. 




Tall or short 



for TV, Microwave, AM, FM 



IDECO Tower "Know-How" keeps you on the air 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 73 



STATIONS 



TOWERS...ANY KIND 
ANYWHERE... 

^FAST! 




Stainless shipping facilities assure fast 
delivery! Railroad sidings adjacent to 
the Stainless Plant provide direct load- 
ing. Overhead crane tracks and hoists 
facilitate rapid loading of as many as 
four gondolas at a time with precision 
placement and security for long hauls. 

The Stainless Plant is near the Phila- 
delphia International Airport, the Port 
of Philadelphia and only a few hours 
from New York docks and rail centers. 



£3otai«iless, inc. 

NORTH WALES . PENNSYLVANIA 



Mort Silverman Executive V.P. 
At Southland Broadcasting Co. 

MORT SILVERMAN, for the past six years 
general manager of WMRY New Orleans, 

has been named ex- 
ecutive vice president 
and general manager 
of Southland Broad- 
casting Co. in charge 
of the company's two 
properties, WMRY 
and KCIJ Shreve- 
port, La. Mr. Silver- 
man will concentrate 
on national and re- 
gional sales for both 
stations and will 
headquarter in New 
Orleans. 

John Revisore, 
commerical manager of WMRY, has been pro- 
moted to station manager, and Mike Verges 
replaces him as commercial manager. Bob 
Shipley, former AP and INS newsman, has been 
appointed station manager for KCIJ. 

KXYZ to Have New Quarters 

KXYZ Houston, Tex., owned by oilman Glenn 
McCarthy, will have a modern new home within 
the next two years if Mr. McCarthy's latest 
building plans conform to schedule. The Texan, 
builder of the Shamrock Hotel in 1949, has 
announced plans to build a 17-story apartment 
hotel on West Holcombe Blvd. at an estimated 
cost of $5 million. With KXYZ housed in its 




MR. SILVERMAN 



lower portion, the entire building will contain 
500 office and hotel rooms, stores, night club 
and swimming pool two stories above ground. 
Nunn, Nunn & Ulbricht are architects. KXYZ 
quarters now are in the Gulf Building. 

WNBT Wellsboro, Pa., Backs 
Drive to Add Plant to Town 

WHEN Wellsboro, Pa. (population 4,200), was 
faced with the challenge of raising at least 
$180,000 by July 1 to provide facilities for an 
industrial firm that considered Wellsboro as a 
favorable site, the city got to work. So did 
WNBT Wellsboro. 

The radio station broadcast a town meeting 
that went into the problem; kicked off the 
appeal for funds with spots filling all open 
availabilities on its schedule; broadcast two 
quarter-hour programs featuring top members 
of the local Chamber of Commerce's industrial 
committee, which had been searching for a 
new industry the past four years, and utilized 
daily newscasts and station breaks, reminding 
Wellsboro residents to "remember, give to 
grow," the station-adopted slogan for the cam- 
paign. 

Last Monday (July 2), the funds were in, 
running as of that date at the $200,000 level. 
The money was raised in only 10 days, reports 
Robert L. Kahle, station manager. Already 
announced: Dresser Mfg. Div. (compression 
fittings) of Dresser Industries will break ground 
July 23 for its new $3 million plant with ma- 
chinery to move in on Oct. 31. The plant will 
employ from 250 to 300 persons with a $1 mil- 
lion annual payroll. 



WIRE TAKES THEM DANCING 



IN INDIANAPOLIS any confession that 
"Arthur Murray Taught Me Dancing in a 
Hurry," like the catchy song of years ago, 
may have special significance. Quite prob- 
ably, the eager student got the initial lead 
from WIRE and disc jockey Bernie 
Herman. 

The pattern evolved by the Indianapolis 
Arthur Murray Dance Studio has proved 
successful for itself and a glowing testi- 
monial for radio, despite some earlier 
sponsor misgivings. The proof lies in the 
rising number of interviews and studio 
employes hired to accommodate dance 
pupils. 

Robert C. Overmyer, account execu- 
tive at Caldwell, Larkin & Sidener-Van 
Riper Inc., which handles the local ac- 
count, reports that "radio has yielded 
comparable returns beyond the measure- 
ment of mere inquiries to build greater 
acceptance for the local studio." 

Its earlier use of spot announcements 
seemed inadequate to do a twin-fold job: 
establish more personal liaison with the 
public and build up this acceptance. So 
the studio, in June 1955, decided to test 
programming, stressing selective use of 
music as an alternative to the audio-visual 
treatment of television. 

The Indianapolis Arthur Murray Studio 
bought a nightly half-hour segment of 
WIRE'S three-hour (10:30 p.m.-l:30 
a.m.) record show, Nite Beat, for a 
modest $100 per week, intending to capi- 
talize on summer late evening listening 



habits. With the help of newspaper ad- 
vertising, the studio doubled its inquiries 
in June over May. The following months, 
using only WIRE participations, they 
jumped another 15% by September. 

Broadcast commitments were backed 
up by telephone surveys, indicating the 
studio had succeeded in creating a favor- 
able acceptance (with the help, of course, 
of the network tv Arthur Murray Dance 
Party). Turning then to the middle-aged 
group, Arthur Murray bought an addi- 
tional quarter-hour of Dance Time with 
Mr. Herman (6: 15-30 p.m.) and last No- 
vember, renewed Nite Beat. Arthur Mur- 
ray recently renewed Nite Beat for still 
another 13 weeks. Jim Willingham is 
WIRE account executive for the show. 

According to Larry Cowick, studio 
manager, Arthur Murray was closing 
80% of its inquiries and had increased its 
staff from 12 to 30 employes. It gained 
400 new pupils during the last three 
months of 1955 (the most successful 
year of its 17 years) and this past Jan- 
uary interviews exceeded the entire sec- 
ond quarter of 1955. Since last June, 
when it started using radio, the studio 
has double its staff 100% (it added 30 in 
January alone — from 40 to 70). 

Today, with virtually all its advertis- 
ing budget on WIRE— ($1,000-$ 1,500 
monthly) — the Indianapolis Arthur Mur- 
ray Studio retains both programs. Its 
record of inquiries and employment con- 
tinues to augur well for the medium. 



Page, 74 ■? July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



Estabrook Buys WERI 

APPLICATION was filed last week seeking 
FCC approval of the sale of WERI Westerly, 
R. I., to former NBC-TV producer Edwin B. 
Estabrook Jr., for $69,000. WERI, 1230 kc, 
250 w, is owned 100% by William F. Malo Jr. 
and family and has been on the air since 1949. 
In selling, Mr. Malo indicated that he would 
like to enter broadcasting in a large market. 
Mr. Estabrook was with NBC-TV until a year 
ago and he is currently director of radio-tv 
for Product Services Inc., New York adver- 
tising agency. 

UBC Opens Chicago Office 

OPENING of Chicago offices at 75 E. Wacker 
Dr. has been announced by Richard Eaton, pres- 
ident of United Broadcasting Co. stations, with 
Seymour Thomas as midwestern manager. Chi- 
cago telephone number is Randolph 6-5464. 
United comprises WOOK and WFAN (FM) 
Washington, D. C; WANT Richmond, Va.; 
WSID Baltimore, Md.; WARK Hagerstown, 
Md.; WINX Rockville, Md.; WJMO Cleveland, 
Ohio. The firm also has grants for WTLF (TV) 
Baltimore and WOOK-TV Washington. 

Henry Reinsch Dies 

FUNERAL services were held last Friday for 
Henry E. Reinsch, 75, father of J. Leonard 
Reinsch, executive director of the Cox stations 
and assistant chairman of the Democratic Na- 
tional Committee for 1956 convention arrange- 
ments. The elder Mr. Reinsch was stricken 
with a heart attack at his south side Chicago 
home Tuesday morning. 

REPRESENTATIVE PEOPLE 
Robert E. Richer, WABC New York, to Adam 
Young Inc., N. Y., as account executive. 

John E. McArdle, salesman in NBC-TV's par- 
ticipating program department (Today, Home, 
and Tonight), to NBC Spot Sales in similar 
capacity. Anthony R. Liotti, NBC research 
and presentation specialist, L. A., transferred 
to N. Y. as presentation writer, NBC Spot 
Sales. 

Gil Christeon, recently salesman for WGN 
Chicago and previously with time-buying de- 
partment of J. Walter Thompson Co., to Chi- 
cago sales staff of Weed & Co. 

STATION PEOPLE 
Martin McAuliffe, president of McAuliffe Adv. 

Agency Inc., New 
Orleans, appointed 
commercial manager 
of Supreme Broad- 
casting Co. (WJMR- 
AM-FM-TV New 
Orleans and WORA- 
AM-FM-TV Maya- 
guez, P. R.). 

Alan Purves, account 
executive, KBIF 
J Fresno, Calif., ap- 

■4/ pointed sales man- 

MR. McAULIFFE a g er - Jim Bai,e y> 

announcer, promoted 

to program director, and Bill Foulkes, announ- 
cer, to chief announcer. Frank Cassidy, tele- 
vision packager and former KBIF salesman, 
returned to station sales staff. John Sunders, 
KGST Fresno, and Robert H. Dreyer, former 
Fresno food broker, also to KBIF sales staff. 
Fred Roberts, formerly of KDSX Dennison, 
Tex., to KBIF announcing staff. 

John F. Connors, appointed audience and sales 
promotion manager, KLZ-TV Denver. Quin- 




By the Shores of WTCN 

A MINNESOTA lake has been named 
"WTCN Lake" after WTCN-AM-TV 
Minneapolis-St. Paul by the state Con- 
servation Commission in appreciation 
"for the fine service rendered in teaching 
conservation on its programs." Minnesota 
Outdoors, the stations' weekly show, has 
been stressing conservation, hunting, 
fishing, skiing and archery for nine years 
on both radio and tv. 



tin E. McCredie, WNBF Binghamton, N. Y., 
returned to KLZ as audience and sales promo- 
tion manager. 



John P. Wiley, director of sales promotion, 
WRCV-TV Philadelphia, appointed director of 
advertising and promotion. Gene E. Stout, 
WRCV-TV, named director of publicity, 
WRCV-AM-TV. 

Jack S. Petrik, chief engineer, WJMR-TV New 
Orleans, appointed chief engineer, KETV (TV) 
Omaha. 

Dick Zavon, client service director, WLWC (TV) 
Columbus. Ohio, named manager of audience 
promotion, Crosley Broadcasting Co. (WLW- 
WLWT [TV] Cincinnati. WLWD [TV] Dayton 
and WLWC [TV] Columbus, all Ohio, WLWA 
[TV] Atlanta). Jack Kavanagh, former account 
executive. Byer & Bowman Adv. Agency, Co- 
lumbus, succeeds Mr. Zavon as client service 
director at WLWC. 





Ask the BRANHAM BOYS 




NBC AFFILIATE 



CHATTANOOGA 



^DEF/Uadio 



CARTER M. PARHAM, President • KEN FLENNIKEN, General Manager 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 75 



STATIONS 



HIGHER 

RATINGS 

Feb. 1956 Shreveport ARB Area Survey 

LEADING in 22/2 

morning quarter hours. 

LEADING in 45/ 2 

afternoon quarter hours. 

LEADING m si 

nighttime quarter hours. 

GREATER 

COVERAGE 

KTBS-TV Channel 3, Shreveport, 
Louisiana, covers 44 counties in 
Louisiana, east Texas and south 
Arkansas. Population 1,351,700; 
set count 249,895. 

• 

MORE 

VIEWERS 
PER DOLLAR 

55% of the viewing audience 
from sign-on time to 12 noon. 
82% of the weekday afternoon 
audience. 

72% of the nighttime NBC au- 
dience in the Shreveport area. 

MAXIMUM POWER 

KTBS-Tt 

CHANNEL 

SHREVEPORT 2 
LOUISIANA 

E. NEWTON WRAY, 
President & Gen. Mgr. 

NBC and ABC 

Represented by 



Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

N(W YOSK ■ CHICAGO ■ ATIANTA ■ 0£I»OI1 ' 10( ANGElEi ' iAN fllANCIiCO ■ ST lOUIt 




O. D. GARRET, manager of Kerr's Depart- 
ment Store, Oklahoma City, signs for 
sponsorship of a local Window insert on 
NBC-TV's Home. The five minute women's 
fashion segment will be telecast in color 
every weekday (9:25-9:30 a.m. CST) on 
WKY-TV that city. Also present for the 
contract signing (I to r): Grace Vawter, 
Kerr's advertising manager; Ray Acker- 
man, Knox-Ackerman Adv., Oklahoma 
City; W. J. Willis, WKY-TV account exec- 
utive, and DeLois Faulkner, WKY-TV fash- 
ion consultant and host of the new show. 



Clif Rucker, office manager, L. A. office of 
Broadcast Time Sales, to KHJ Hollywood as 
account executive. 

Peggy Peerce named public relations and pro- 
motion director, WCPO-AM-FM-TV Cincin- 
nati, succeesding Dave Wilson, to WLW-AM 
WLWT (TV) Cincinnati. 

Chuck Renwick, WSAM Saginaw, Mich., to 
WKNX there as program director and after- 
noon show host, succeeding Paul Carey, to 
WJR Detroit. 

Ray Hubbard, KPIX (TV) San Francisco, ap- 
pointed assistant program director of WBZ-TV 
Boston; Gordon Scott, named operations di- 
rector of WBZ-TV program department; Iran 
Berlow to production supervisor, and Chester 
Collier, to head station's new public affairs 
department. 

Warren Thomas, WKRC-TV Cincinnati air 
personality, to station sales staff as account 
executive. Herbert Flaig, account executive, 
resigned to open Cincinnati advertising agency. 
Paul Jones, Cincinnati radio-tv personality, to 
WKRC-TV announcing staff. 

Bob Shoaff, program director, KBTV (TV) 
Denver, resigned. Shirley Hanheide, traffic 
manager, named assistant program director. 
Sue Bard, program secretary, to assist Miss 
Hanheide. 

Tom Dwyer, formerly with WNOW-TV York, 
Pa., to sales department, WOKO Albany, N. Y. 

George Vickery, public service director, 
WTVJ (TV) Miami, Fla., named to additional 
post of publicity director. 

John Schweiker, sales promotion department, 
WHO-AM-TV Des Moines, Iowa, transferred 
to account executive. Robert O. Link from 
radio continuity to sales promotion. Darwin 
Wolf and Hibbard Cleveland to sales staff. 

Sidney D. Hall, Albert Trostel Packings Ltd., 
Lake Geneva, Wis., to sales department of 
WFRV-TV Green Bay, Wis. 



Sherman Horn, in radio since 1929, to KCSB 
San Bernardino, Calif., as account executive. 
Pat Bilby to KCSB as night disc jockey. 

LaMar Smith, executive producer, WOI-TV 
Ames, Iowa, to KUTV (TV) Salt Lake City 
as production manager. 

Robert French, public relations specialist, to 
sales department of WCOL Columbus, Ohio. 

Mildred Bailey, broadcaster on WCOP Boston, 
resigned to devote full time to her new food 
promotion business, Happy Homemakers Inc., 
Boston. 

Ed Smith, McCann-Erickson, N. Y., to WHLI 
Hempstead, N. Y., as staff announcer. 

Beverly Hay, radio-tv graduate, Michigan State 
U., to continuity staff of WOOD-AM-TV 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Larry Cott, formerly news editor, KFRC San 
Francisco, to news writing staff of KGO-AM- 
FM-TV San Francisco. 

Gus Grebe, sportscaster, to KWIZ Santa Ana, 
Calif. 

Lloyd E. Yoder, vice president-general man- 
ager, WRCV-AM-TV Philadelphia, elected to 
board of directors, World Affairs Council of 
Phila. 

Cecil Woodland, general manager, WEIL 
Scranton, Pa., named chairman of manufac- 
turing division, 1956 Lackawanna, Pa., United 
Fund drive. 

William Weber, retail sales account executive, 
KMOX St. Louis, father of boy, William 
Gregor. 

Donald K. Ross, program director, KGFI 
Hollywood, father of girl lune 27. 

Patrick Clifton Wilkins, newscaster, KEX Port- 
land, Ore., father of boy, Patrick Ir., lune 26. 
Rod Smith, station auditor and office manager, 
father of boy, Bradley Kendel, lune 27. 

Beverly Johnson, office manager, KHOL-TV 
Kearney, Neb., married to Dale Carlson June 
24. 

Don Roberts, member of sales staff of WCOL 
Columbus, and Jodelle Penzone, receptionist 
at station, married July 7. 

Dick Aker, program director, KVOL Lafayette, 
La., father of boy, Gregory Lee, June 23. Mrs. 
Aker was Opal Davis, former engineer at Texas 
stations. 



Pole to Pole 

WHEN rioting broke out in Poznan, Po- 
land, WTMJ-AM-TV Milwaukee went to 
great lengths to reassure hometowners 
that none of a group of Milwaukee and 
Wisconsin residents touring Poland at 
the time were involved. The stations' 
news department put through its longest 
telephone call so far, to Warsaw, Poland, 
recording a conversation with Miss Laura 
Pilarski, a Milwaukee Journal reporter. 
She is visiting Poland with what is said 
to be the first organized party to tour 
the country since it fell under Communist 
domination during World War II. Miss 
Pilarski told newsman Ed Winkel that 
none of the Wisconsin delegation had 
been in Poznan at the time of the riots 
and gave details on the uprising which 
unofficial reports said claimed some 200 
lives. The conversation was aired on 
WTMJ and WTMJ-TV several times 
July 2. 



Page 76 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



RELIABILITY! 

Exclusive Patchover — prevents serious loss of air time; elim- 
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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 77 



— PROFESSIONAL SERVICES — 



PERSONNEL RELATIONS 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICE PEOPLE 

Joe Wolhandler, eastern publicity director of 
Rogers & Cowan for past five years, elected 
vice president of public relations firm. 

Doris A. Weininger, director of continuity. 
WNYC-AM-FM New York, to head of radio- 
tv department, Milton Riback Assoc., N. Y. 
public relations firm. 

Arthur La Cour, radio-tv manager, Walker & 
Crenshaw, N. Y. public relations counsel, to 
U. S. Rubber Co., N. Y., as head of radio-tv 
in firm's public relations department. 

Jane Peck Lait, publicity director, Hutchins 
Adv. and Cathedral Films, both Hollywood, 
named west coast publicity representative, 
American Heart Assn. 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICE SHORTS 

Phil Dean Assoc., N.Y., radio-television public 
relations-promotion company, moved to larger 
offices at 420 Madison Ave. Telephone is Plaza 
3-7492. 

Biderman, Tolk & Assoc., N.Y. public rela- 
tions-promotion firm, moved to 515 Madison 
Ave. Telephone: Plaza 3-7919. 

Hal Leyshon & Assoc., public relations counsel 
for American Federation of Musicians and 
other accounts, moved to new offices in Chanin 
Bldg., 122 E. 42d St., New York 17. Telephone: 
Murray Hill 7-0272. 

Gene Schoor Assoc., N. Y., public relations 
firm, moved to 36 W. 57th St. 



SAG Seeks Strengthening 
Of Parent Talent Group 

SCREEN ACTORS GUILD Thursday asked 
the Associated Actors & Artists of America, 
AFL-CIO international parent of all actors' 
unions, to call a special meeting for the purpose 
of strengthening and revitalizing the interna- 
tional union. As one objective, SAG listed the 
"setting up of machinery of the four A's for the 
impartial settlement of jurisdictional problems 
between actors' unions." SAG currently has 
been in dispute with American Federation of 
Television & Radio Artists. 

The guild's letter to the four A's was signed 
by John L. Dales, national executive secretary, 
and copies were sent to each of the other 4A 
branches — Actors Equity, AFTRA, American 
Guild of Musical Artists, American Guild of 
Variety Artists and Screen Extras Guild. 

The Guild's action followed by 10 days its 
issuance of a special report to the guild mem- 
bership, signed by President Walter Pidgeon for 
the board of directors, in which the guild de- 
tailed its reasons for rejecting an AFTRA pro- 
posal for a merger with SAG [B*T, July 2]. 
The guild pledged it would work toward "a 
stronger and more vigorous international fed- 
eration (of actors' unions) and a simplified 
membership card plan for the entire entertain- 
ment industry." 

Writers Guild to Select 
Best Radio, Tv Scripts 

PLANS for book publication of the best tele- 
vision and radio scripts of 1955-56, as selected 
by writers who work in these mediums, were 





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outlined at meetings of the Eastern and West- 
ern Tv-Radio Branch boards of the Writers 
Guild of America. Entry blanks for the con- 
test are in the process of being mailed to 
members for return by July 30. 

Competition has been divided into eight cat- 
egories for television writers and four for radio 
writers. Each member may enter one script 
in only one of the categories, whether for tv 
or radio. The categories are as follows: 

Television: (1) half-hour anthology drama, 
(2) half-hour episodic drama, (3) half-hour sit- 
uation comedy, (4) half-hour comedy-variety, 
(5) one-hour or more drama, (6) one-hour or 
more comedy, (7) documentary, (8) children's 
program (not the action-adventure type which 
would come under drama, but puppets fairy- 
tales, actual children, etc.). Radio: (1) drama, 
(2) comedy, (3) serial episodes, (4) document- 
ary. 

Each member who submits a script must 
also serve as a preliminary judge in a category 
other than the one in which he is seeking an 
award. Preliminary sifting will be done by 
committees of the entrants, and final judging 
by a board drawn again from writers, plus ex- 
perts from associated crafts. All names of 
authors will be removed in the judging process, 
and key numbers substituted to assure ano- 
nymity until final selection. 

Presentation of the awards will be made at 
special functions to be held east and west, early 
this fall. Royalties of the book will be shared 
by writers whose scripts are included and the 
Guild. 

AFTRA Readies Charges 

AMERICAN Federation of Television & Radio 
Artists announced last week that the national 
union is preparing charges against 15 members 
of the New York local who refused to tell a 
Congressional committee last summer whether 
or not they ever had been Communist Party 
members. The union's announcement was made 
to "clarify" a newspaper report which failed to 
mention that the action originated with national 
AFTRA, according to Donald F. Conaway, 
national executive secretary. AFTRA has insti- 
tuted a rule under which charges can be pre- 
ferred against a member who refuses to answer 
questions on whether he is or ever has been a 
communist. 

IATSE Reports DuMont Pact 

SIGNING of a new contract between DuMont 
Broadcasting Corp. and the International Alli- 
ance of Theatrical Stage Employes was an- 
nounced last week by IATSE. The pact covers 
engineers and other technicians employed at 
DuMont's WABD (TV) New York and WTTG 
(TV) Washington, and, according to IATSE, 
provides for "substantial wage increases." 

PERSONNEL RELATIONS 
PEOPLE 

Mikel Kane, CBS-TV director, elected presi- 
dent of Hollywood chapter of Radio-Tv Di- 
rectors Guild succeeding Stuart W. Phelps of 
Ralph Edwards organization. Other new of- 
ficers of chapter are vice president Jack John- 
stone, CBS Radio; secretary Tom Belcher, 
NBC, and treasurer Bob Adams, CBS-TV. 
Elected to board were tv comic Jerry Lewis; 
Frank Morris, ABC; Gene Webster, CBS; 
Jack Shea, NBC-TV; Howard Quinn, CBS-TV; 
Richard C. Bennett, NBC-TV, Lester Vail, 
CBS-TV and Gordon Wiles, NBC-TV. 

Max Herman elected vice president of Holly- 
wood Local 47, American Federation of Mu- 
sicians, succeeding Cecil Read, suspended [B*T 
June 18]. Lou Butterman to replace John 
Clyman on board. They serve until member- 
ship meeting this month. 



Page 78 • July 9, 1956 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



NETWORKS 



NBC, MAJORS SIGN 
$16 MILLION PACT 

New contract runs through 
1961 and covers World Series 
and All-Star games. 

NBC has purchased television and radio rights 
for the World Series and All-Star games for 
the years 1957-61 inclusive for $3,250,000 a 
year, it was announced last week by Commis- 
sioner of Baseball Ford C. Frick. The baseball 
events, as in past years, will be sponsored by 
the Gillette Safety Razor Co., Boston through 
Maxon Inc., New York. 

The new agreement will become effective 
with the All-Star game in July 1957 and will 
replace the six-year conrtact which expires with 
the World Series of this year. In 1951 Mutual 
acquired the rights to the game and assigned 
the tv rights to NBC-TV. Mutual reportedly 
paid $1 million a year for the tv-radio rights. 

"In view of the cordial relationship that has 
existed among the three parties in the past," Mr. 
Frick said, "the new arrangement is an espe- 
cially happy one. When it became known 
that the present contract was about to expire, 
considerable interest was shown by others in 
the sponsorship of the games; however the 
most satisfactory offer from every standpoint 
was made by the current sponsors. 

"We are deeply gratified that, as a result of 
this agreement, the pension fund for baseball 
players is now protected and guaranteed for an- 
other five years. It is anticipated that it will 
now be possible to offer even more liberal bene- 
fits under the Player Pension Plan, which is al- 
ready one of the most generous in existence." 




FORD FRICK (c), commissioner of baseball, 
meets with NBC President Robert W. Sar- 
noff (I) and Boone Gross, president of Gil- 
lette Safety Razor Co., to discuss the pur- 
chase of World Series and All-Star rights 
by NBC for Gillette sponsorship. 

Sarnoff Memo Inspires 
New NBC Thursday Show 

A MEMORANDUM submitted last year to 
President Eisenhower by Brig. Gen. David 
Sarnoff, RCA board chairman, detailing a 
"Program for a Political Offensive Against 
World Communism" is the basis of a new 13- 
week series which NBC Radio will air this sum- 
mer. The series, Can Freedom Win?, conceived 
by radio producer Hardy Burt who approached 
Gen. Sarnoff on the series idea after having 
read the memorandum, will be heard Thursdays, 
9:05-9:30 p.m. EDT, starting this week. 

The program's production cost will be borne 
by the Richardson Foundation, a non-profit 
group dedicated to further study in international 
affairs and citizenship education and headed by 
S. Smith Richardson, board chairman of the 
Vick Chemical Co., New York. Regular panel- 



ists include Mr. Burt, Reader's Digest Senior 
Editor Eugene Lyons and Dr. Robert Strausz- 
Hupe, director of the Foreign Policy Research 
Institute, U. of Pennsylvania. In addition to 
the panel, a weekly guest will be chosen from 
the ranks of labor, education, government or 
the military. 

Gen. Sarnoff's memorandum called for a 
public education program to familiarize all 
Americans with Soviet policy toward world 
domination. Mr. Burt said the principal aim 
of the program is "an attempt to define the 
significance and goals of international commu- 
nism and to receive the recommendations of 
the country's leading authorities as to what 
should be U. S. policy in relation to the Soviet 
empire." 

KBS Adds 10 Affiliates 

ADDITION of 10 new affiliates was announced 
Monday by Keystone Broadcasting System. The 
new stations bring total affiliates to 897, ac- 
cording to Blanche Stein. KBS station relations 
director. They are KNOG Nogales, Ariz.; 
WSNT Sandersville, Ga.; KTOP Topeka, Kan.; 
KLWT Lebanon, Mo.; KVHC O'Neill, Neb.; 
WMSN Raleigh, N. C; WSRW Hillsboro, Ohio; 
WBCR Christiansburg, Va.; KILA Hilo, T. H., 
and WIVI Christiansted (St. Croix), Virgin 
Islands. 

WELD New ABC Affiliate 

ADDITION of WELD Fisher, W. Va., as an 
ABC Radio affiliate, effective Aug. I, was an- 
nounced jointly last week by Richard F. Lewis 
Jr., owner of the station, and Edward J. DeGray 
national director of station relations for ABC 
Radio. Kimberley Johnson is station manager 
of WELD. 




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Broadcasting • Telecasting July 9, 1956 • Page 79 



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Page 80 • July 9, 1956 



NETWORKS 



Shriner Fall CBS-TV Show 
Now Slated for 30 Minutes 

CBS-TV, which recently signed comedian Herb 
Shriner to a new full-hour program for the 
1956-57 season following the expiration of his 
contract with Mark Goodson and Bill Todman, 
has trimmed the program to 30 minutes 
and rescheduled it in the Tuesday, 9-9:30 p.m. 
EDT timeslot. The program was originally set 
for 8:30-9:30 p.m. Tuesdays, but was trimmed 
when the network found itself unable to "clear 
a full hour due to lack of time availabilities." 

Mr. Shriner, however, was assured by the 
network of a full-hour show during the 1957- 
58 season. 

As originally planned, Pharmaceuticals Inc., 
through Edward Kletter Assoc., New York, 
was to sponsor the second half of the Shriner 
program. It retained the 9-9:30 p.m. timeslot 
of the past season (alternating sponsorship of 
Meet Millie and Guy Lombardo Jubilee, both 
now off the air) by purchasing CBS-TV's Joe 
and Mabel film series for the summer. Phar- 
maceuticals Inc. will thus become Mr. Shriner's 
sole sponsor of the new 30-minute program. 
Sponsorship plans for the first half of the 
former hour-long program had not been an- 
nounced. 

The vacated half-hour has been bought by 
the W. A. Sheaffer Pen Co., Ft. Madison, Iowa, 
through Russel M. Seeds Co., Chicago, which 
plans to feature a CBS-owned film show, The 
Brothers (starring Gale Gordon and Bob 
Sweeney) at that time. Kick-off dates for 
the shows have not been announced. Sheaffer 
this past season shared sponsorship (with May- 
tag) of the 8:30-9 p.m. Navy Log series. 

Messrs. Goodson and Todman produce Two 
for the Money, which starred Mr. Shriner last 
season. 

ABC-TV Affiliates Board 

To Meet With Network Brass 

THE Board of Governors of the ABC-TV 
Affiliates Assn. will meet at Pocono Manor Inn, 
Pocono Manor, Pa., July 16-17, to be followed 
by a meeting July 18 with ABC President 
Robert E. Kintner and other network execu- 
tives, Fred S. Houwink, chairman of the 
affiliates and general manager of WMAL-TV 
Washington, announced last week. 

This will be the first meeting of the board 
since its organization May 24 in Kansas City 
[B*T, May 28]. The affiliates requested a session 
with ABC executives at the Kansas City meet- 
ing and the July 18 affair will fulfill that re- 
quest. Mr. Houwink said that the affiliates 
would give the network their viewpoints in 
helping ABC-TV attain a stronger national 
position. 

Other affiliate officers include Harry LeBrun, 
general manager of WLWA (TV) Atlanta, vice 
chairman; Joseph F. Hladky, executive vice 
president of KCRG-TV Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 
secretary, and Joseph Drilling, vice president of 
KJEO-TV Fresno, Calif., treasurer. 

KNX-CPRN Promotes Sieck 

CARLETON SIECK, account executive for 
KNX Los Angeles and the Columbia Pacific 
Radio Network, has been named assistant gen- 
eral sales manager, it was announced Thursday 
by KNX-CPRN Sales Manager Donald M. 
Ross. With KNX since 1951, Mr. Sieck fills 
the vacancy created two months ago when Ful- 
ton Wilkins was switched to New York as east- 
ern sales representative for KNX-CPRN. Mr. 
Ross also announced the promotion of William 
Weller from national sales representative to 
account executive, succeeding Mr. Sieck. 



New Sunday King? 

IS STEVE ALLEN the man who has 
"knocked off" Ed Sullivan? Trendex fig- 
ures reported last week: Mr. Allen's NBC- 
TV show in the Sunday 8-9 p.m. EDT 
time period scored a 20.2 rating as con- 
trasted to 14.8 for Mr. Sullivan's program 
at the same time on CBS-TV. Mr. Allen, 
according to Trendex, had 55.3% share 
of audience and Mr. Sullivan 39.7%. 
This was NBC's best showing in that slot 
since the May 30, 1954, Martin & Lewis 
telecast which outdrew the Ed Sullivan 
Show with a 62.3% share. Mr. Allen's 
score was 3Vi times as large as that of 
the last telecast (June 10) of the Comedy 
Hour. In the past season, NBC beat 
Mr. Sullivan only three times, twice via 
Martin & Lewis appearances and the third 
time with a spectacular. 



Clinic Will Tackle Problems 
Of CBS-TV Football Coverage 

ALL-DAY clinic will be held in New York 
this Wednesday under the auspices of the CBS 
Sports Dept. to tackle the problems involved in 
CBS-TV's coverage this fall of 63 professional 
games on a regional basis. In attendance will 
be CBS staffers, representatives of the sponsors 
and their agencies, officials of the 11 teams, 
Bert Bell, commissioner of the National Foot- 
ball League, and several of his aides. 

William C. MacPhail, director of sports for 
CBS, will officiate at the clinic, assisted by 
Judson Bailey, executive producer of CBS-TV, 
and Elmer Lower, director of special projects 
for CBS. 

The schedule of games is virtually at an SRO 
basis, according to Mr. MacPhail, with 15 
sponsors already having signed. He pointed out 
that one of the complications is that at certain 
times, CBS-TV will be covering six games 
simultaneously from points across the country. 

Ail CBS Radio Affiliates 
Back Raise in Network Pay 

EVERY AFFILIATE of CBS Radio has ap- 
proved the network's increase of the rate in 
payments for the coming year over the current 
year, it was announced last week by Arthur 
Hull Hayes, president of CBS Radio (At 
Deadline, June 1 1 , et seq ) . 

Approval was received in the form of signed 
amendments sent to the stations from the net- 
work, according to Mr. Hayes. The new agree- 
ment, which calls for payment rates to the 
stations of 6-V4 % above the current rate of 
compensation, will go into effect on Aug. 25. 
New one-year contract amendment will specify 
15% rather than 20% as amount of reduction 
borne by the affiliates in comparison to pre- 1951 
compensation rates. 

First 'Playhouse 90' Set 

THE LIVE tv adaptation of Pat Frank's re- 
cently-published suspense novel, Forbidden 
Area, was set last week for the Oct. 1 1 premiere 
show of CBS-TV's Playhouse 90 series. Tv play- 
wright Rod Serling will do the adaptation for 
the 90-minute weekly dramatic series, scheduled 
for Thursday, 9:30-11 p.m. EDT. At the same 
time, Hubbell Robinson Jr., CBS-TV executive 
vice president in charge of programming, said 
that rights to John P. Marquand's most recent 
noval Sincerely, Willis Wayde, and Maxwell 
Anderson's Broadway play, Star Wagon, had 
been purchased. 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 




"WITHOUT ADVENTU 
CIVILIZATION IS IN FULL 



9 f 



-Alfred North Whitehead 



Which can be translated to mean . . . 

e f Without inquisitiveness, 
an industry goes to seed. " 

Inquisitiveness, spurred by competition, has 
led this nation's 88 steel companies to investi- 
gate and create hundreds of new kinds of steel 
to meet the needs for better things at lower cost. 

Only a free enterprise system permits such 
competition. 



REPUBLIC STEEL 

GENERAL OFFICES • CLEVELAND 1, OHIO 
EXPANDING BY $150,000,000 TODAY BECAUSE OF FAITH IN TOMORROW 




For Example: 

Republic Steel's planned, new 
Central Research Lab will explore, 
among other things, methods for 
new, cheaper ways of producing steel. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



July 9, 1956 • Page 81 



POLITICAL BROADCASTING 



SMALL CHANCE SEEN FOR SENATE ACTION 
ON ANY POLITICAL BROADCASTING BILLS 

Final session of 84th Congress nearing adjournment without taking 
definite action on many proposals which would regulate radio-tv 
election year broadcasting. Stanton submits CBS views. 



CHANCES for action on any of the several 
bills on political broadcasting grew slimmer last 
week as the 84th Congress entered the stretch. 

Meanwhile, CBS President Frank Stanton has 
forwarded comments to the Senate Commerce 
Committee giving CBS views on the bills in the 
Senate on political broadcasting. Dr. Stanton's 
comments were made at the request of Com- 
mittee Chairman Warren G. Magnuson (D- 
Wash.) during the CBS president's testimony 
before the Senate group last month [B«T, June 
18]. 

Sen. Magnuson has said several times that his 
committee will hold hearings on the political 
broadcasting measures before the end of this 
session of Congress, but no dates have been set, 
and with Congress anticipating adjournment by 
the end of this month the possibility of congres- 
sional action this year grows less certain. 

One measure in the Senate (S 3308) — de- 
scribed as the "honest elections bill" and in- 
troduced by Senate Majority Leader Lyndon 
B. Johnson (D-Tex.) and Minority Leader Wil- 
liam F. Knowland (R-Calif.) with total cospon- 
sorship by 82 senators — had brighter prospects 
earlier in the session. But last week spokesmen 
for the Senate Majority Policy Committee, 
which clears such legislation for Senate action, 
said that although the measure is being studied, 
its chances of passage grow less as the session 
nears an end. Besides election reforms, this bill 



carries an amendment to Sec. 315 of the Com- 
munications Act. It was introduced at the 
height of the controversy over lobbying activi- 
ties concerning the natural gas bill vetoed by the 
President. 

Dr. Stanton, in his comments on the Senate 
bills (there are corresponding bills in the House 
to all the Senate proposals), reiterated his 
support of S 2306 — introduced in both the 
House and Senate at CBS' suggestion. The bill 
would make inapplicable the "equal time" pro- 
visions of Sec. 315 in cases where a station 
or network presents political candidates on 
news, debate and similar type programs of 
which format and production are controlled by 
the broadcaster — as distinguished from set cam- 
paign speeches and rallies and paid political 
spot announcements. 

The CBS president again scored any proposal 
to require broadcasters to give free time to 
political candidates. But he said that if S 2306 
or equivalent legislation is passed, CBS will 
donate one hour to the two major party presi- 
dential candidates this fall to use in debate or 
other discussion of the campaign issues. 

Here are summaries of the various Senate 
political broadcasting bills, with Dr. Stanton's 
comments on each proposal contained in the 
measures: 

S 771 — Withdraw the equal time rights of 
Sec. 315 (a) of the Communications Act from 
any person who has been convicted of sub- 



No one knows Connecticut better 
than the LOCAL AGENCY MAN! 

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develop a first-hand knowledge 
of the market and the most ef- 
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WGTH-TV has demonstrated its 
ability to build both a top-rated 
early news and a top-rated late 




Ed Graceman 

President, Graceman 
Advertising, Inc. 




weather show for two of our 
regional clients." 



H-R REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 
NEW YORK • CHICAGO 
SAN FRANCISCO • HOLLYWOOD 



W GTH 

Hartford, Connecticut 



Parties Unite for Spots 

A PACKAGE of 100 spots was sold 
jointly by WEPG South Pittsburg, Term., 
to the Marion County Democratic execu- 
tive committee and the county's Repub- 
lican executive committee in a non-parti- 
san appeal for prospective voters to 
qualify to vote by registering before the 
July 10 deadline. 

Since it appeared unlikely that the 
chairmen of both committees could be 
persuaded to attend a joint conference, 
WEPG Commercial Manager Hugh B. 
Patton acted as intermediary, talking first 
with one and then the other, until a satis- 
factory arrangement was worked out. 

The election in question is scheduled 
for Aug. 2 and is both county general 
election and Democratic and GOP state 
primaries. 




Page 82 • July 9, 1956 



versive activities and from members of certain 
subversive organizations. 

Dr. Stanton said CBS has no objections to the 
bill's principles, but it places a difficult burden 
on the broadcaster by requiring him to de- 
termine whether a person has been convicted 
of subversion or whether he is a member of 
certain subversive organizations. 

S 1208 — Relieve the licensee of liability for 
defamatory statements broadcast by a political 
candidate unless the licensee participates in the 
broadcast with intent to defame. 

Dr. Stanton said CBS supports the bill's prin- 
ciple, which would relieve the broadcasters of 
liability for statements over which he has no 
censoring power. But, he said: (1) it is not 
clear federal legislation can exempt broadcasters 
from liability under state laws; (2) the risks of 
suits for libel and defamation do not appear 
to be great. CBS has had no serious difficulty 
with the problem, and, although CBS has no 
power to censor, political candidates have been 
cooperative almost invariably and voluntarily 
have deleted statements the network thought 
might be defamatory or libelous. 

S 1909 — Require any political broadcast to 
be accompanied by an announcement of whether 
the speaker is speaking extemporaneously or 
from prepared material, and what facial make- 
up, if any, is being used by the speaker during 
the broadcast. 

Dr. Stanton said CBS had no comment, but 
that the bill seems to be discriminatory against 
broadcast stations by requiring for this medium 
a degree of candor not required for any other 
public appearance by a candidate. 

S 2306 — Make the "equal time" requirements 
inapplicable to "any news, news interview, news 
documentary, panel discussion, debate or similar 
type program where the format and production 
of the program and the participants therein are 
determined by the broadcasting station, or by 
the network in the case of a network pro- 
gram. . . ." 

Dr. Stanton noted that this bill was intro- 
duced at the request of CBS and that it leaves 
Sec. 315 just as it is in the case of set campaign 
speeches or political rallies. But in the types 
of programs specified, it gives the broadcaster 
leeway in the exercise of his journalistic func- 
tions so he can concentrate on the main issues 
and candidates without providing time for 
candidates of splinter parties. He noted there 
were candidates from 18 parties seeking the 
presidency and vice presidency in 1952. 

S 3308 — Apply the "equal time" guarantees, 
in the case of candidates for President or vice 
president, only to those who are nominees of a 
major political party or to those who are sup- 
ported by petitions equalling at least 1 % of the 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



vote at the prior presidential election. 

Dr. Stanton said the bill takes a "useful step 
forward" in relieving the broadcaster of the 
requirement to furnish time to fringe party 
presidential and vice presidential candidates. 
But it provides no relief in the case of candi- 
dates for nomination for the presidency, nor 
does it provide relief in campaigns at any level 
other than the presidency or vice presidency. 
It is the obscure candidates for nomination, 
even of major parties, who have given broad- 
casters some of their biggest headaches: "The 
short of it is that anybody who wants the presi- 
dential nomination of the Democratic or Repub- 
lican parties today has equal right to President 
Eisenhower ... or to Govs. Stevenson and 
Harriman or Sen. Kefauver. . . . There is no 
limit to the potential candidates. It seems to 
me . . . relief in respect of candidates for nom- 
ination is imperative." 

S 3962 provisions: (a) Same as S 3308. 
(b) Impose equal time requirements in the case 
of candidates for presidential and vice presi- 
dential nomination by a major political party, 
if the candidate is (1) the incumbent of any 
elective federal or statewide elective office; or 
(2) has been nominated for President or vice 
president at any prior convention of his party; 
or (3) is supported by petitions including at 
least 200,000 signatures. 

Definitions Inflexible 

Dr. Stanton said this would relieve broad- 
casters of the requirement of giving equal time 
to "unknown or unsubstantial" candidates for 
the Democratic or GOP presidential nomina- 
tion. But these definitions appear somewhat 
inflexible when it is noted that in prior cam- 
paign years petitions would have had to be 
circulated for persons of such stature as Gen. 
Eisenhower, Wendell Willkie, Herbert Hoover 
(in 1928) or John W. Davis, since none met 
these qualifications. This embarrassment could 
be avoided by allowing the broadcaster some 
discretion in determining who is and is not a 
"substantial" candidate for nomination by a 
major party; namely, by using these tests to 
define who could be persumed to be a substan- 
tial candidate, but allowing broadcasters to go 
beyond that to take care of such situations as 
presented by Messrs. Hoover, Willkie and Davis 
and Gen. Eisenhower. 

(c) Applies the equal time requirements only 
to major party nominees for a congressional 
office or to candidates for election who may 
not be nominees of a major party, but who file 
petitions with signatures equaling 1 % of the 
total votes for that office in the last election. 

Dr. Stanton said this is an attempt to provide 
the broadcaster relief from fringe party and 
unsubstantial candidates for a congressional 
office, but leaves the equal time requirements 
where they are now insofar as candidates for 
congressional nomination are concerned. Al- 
though congressional campaigns do not affect 
network broadcasting, he said, the matter may 
be of considerable importance to individual 
stations, especially where there are vigorous 
campaigns with several candidates, some of 
them "clearly unsubstantial." 

(d) Require tv networks and tv stations to 
make available to presidential nominees of the 
two major parties, at no cost to the candidates: 
one half-hour a week during September; one 
hour a week during October, and one hour in 
November preceding the presidential election. 

Dr. Stanton said such a requirement is 
"wholly discriminatory and, I believe, raises 
serious problems of constitutionality. . . . 
Whatever the answers to the problems of finan- 
cing political campaigning, I think it clear that 
the commandeering proposal of [this section] is 
so unfair and of such doubtful constitutionality 
that it should be rejected." 

Dr. Stanton said CBS supports S 2306; that 



S 3308, despite the "serious defects" he noted, 
is a "step forward," and that S 3962 is more 
desirable than S 3308, except that "in no cir- 
cumstances" will CBS support that part of 
S 3962 which requires tv networks and tv sta- 
tions to give free time to presidential candidates 
of major parties. 

The CBS president submitted a redraft of an 
amendment to Sec. 315, which he said CBS 
prefers second to S 2306. The redraft incor- 
porates the broadcaster exemptions from equal 
time requirements for news and debate type 
programs as set forth in S 2306. It also incor- 
porates S 3962 except for the "free time" pro- 
vision. It adds CBS' suggested language which 
would allow the broadcaster to determine who 
is a "substantial" candidate for presidential 
and congressional nomination and election be- 



yond those who meet the requirements set forth 
in S 3962. The CBS suggestions also would 
provide the broadcaster relief from fringe party 
and unsubstantial candidates for congressional 
nomination, in addition to those for congres- 
sional elections. S 3962 failed to cover this 
situation. 

Dr. Stanton reiterated CBS' proposal to give 
perhaps two hours to the two major party 
presidential candidates to divide between them 
for a discussion of the campaign issues before 
election day — provided Congress does not pass 
legislation requiring tv networks and tv stations 
to give "free time" to major party presidential 
nominees as proposed in S 3962. He said CBS 
has already tentatively set aside Class A night- 
time periods for this purpose. 




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July 9, 1956 • Page 83 



Planners Accelerate 
Chicago Preparations 

Facilities readied for influx of 

4,000 newsmen and techicians 

at Democratic convention, 

five weeks away. Increase of 

10-30% in line requirements 

over 1952 is predicted. 

THE PACE and pulse of political convention 
planners and candidates was quickening in 
Chicago last week with curtain time for the 
Democratic show five weeks away. 

Accelerated activity was evident at Demo- 
cratic National Convention headquarters in the 
Conrad Hilton Hotel and in the Stevenson-for- 
President and Campaign Committee camps in 
the city's loop. It also was manifested at net- 
work-station and at the facilities levels, at both 
the International Amphitheatre and Illinois Bell 
Telephone Co. 

From all estimates, total manpower in terms 
of domestic newsmen and technicians of radio- 
tv and other media should hit close to 4,000 
for the Democratic National Convention start- 
ing Aug. 13. Illinois Bell and AT&T's Long 
Lines Dept., predicting a 10-30% increase in 
facilities requirements over 1952, claim a record 
54 microwave "dishes" will be installed for tv 
alone — including 28 atop the amphitheatre, 10 
on the Hilton Hotel, and the remainder on 
other big buildings — as part of its huge commu- 
nications network. 

Nerve center of the Democratic party will 
be Room 800 (actually four rooms) converted 
to offices in the Hilton, where J. Leonard 



KING, Teamsters Team 

KING-AM-TV Seattle simulcasts of the 
Washington state Democratic and Repub- 
lican conventions were sponsored by the 
Community Service Dept. of the Western 
Conference of Teamsters. The television 
portion was covered statewide, with 
KING-TV feeding KREM-TV Spokane 
and KIMA-TV Yakima. 

The Democratic parley was held lune 
30 in Tacoma while the Republicans got 
together July 7 in Seattle. Taking part 
in negotiations for the coverage were Ed 
Donoho, publicity director for the team- 
sters; How J. Ryan and Ed Arndt of the 
How J. Ryan & Assoc. agency; Earl 
Reilly, account executive, John Pindell, 
local sales manager, and Al Hunter, sales 
manager, all of KING-TV. 



Reinsch, assistant to the chairman in charge of 
1956 convention plans and executive director 
of the Cox Stations, maintains headquarters 
with a staff of nine people. His staff is process- 
ing requests for housing in over 40 Chicago 
hotels, along with ticket allocations to dele- 
gates and alternates. A Chicago Host Commit- 
tee headed up by Mayor Richard E. Daley is 
cooperating on arrangements involving trans- 
portation, entertainment and other services for 
an estimated 25,000 persons expected to attend 
ihe convention. 

Actual amphitheatre layout is pretty well 
settled as workmen crews cover the 12,000-seat 
building, laying miles of cable up walls and 
down aisles. Transmission points for radio-tv 



networks and independent stations are being 
set up in a block-long north wing of the amphi- 
theatre. The independents will have complete 
facilities (studio and film) for their own cov- 
erage. 

Structures have been built down-center in the 
amphitheatre for tv and still cameras. Tv and 
theatre newsreel cameras — the latter number- 
ing more than 100 cameramen and crews — will 
work from separate 240-sq. ft. platforms at op- 
posite ends of the delegates' section. 

Representatives of foreign radio-tv stations 
and newspapers (Paris, London, Vienna, Tokyo, 
Honolulu, Winnipeg, Ottawa, Berlin, etc.) are 
expected to attend. 

The fifth and sixth floors of the Hilton Hotel 
will be converted for direct broadcasting in the 
form of radio-tv studios. Newsmen from papers, 
magazines and wire services will be housed in 
a basement quarter. 

Mr. Reinsch and his staff have been facing a 
steady stream of visitors. Assisting him on pre- 
convention planning are Jack F. Christie, radio- 
tv director of the Democratic National Commit- 
tee; Elizabeth Forsling, formerly ABC execu- 
tive coordinator on the 1952 conventions, and 
Lewis Gomavitz, producer of NBC-TV's Kukla, 
Fran & Ollie, who has been engaged to work 
on actual convention site details. Democrats are 
expected to choose a keynote speaker at a 
meeting of their Arrangements Committee to- 
day (Monday). 

Illinois Bell and AT&T are working with con- 
vention planners, radio-tv and press repre- 
sentatives on telephone, teletype, telephoto and 
special circuit equipment. Illinois Bell will 
maintain a message center and a tv lounge 
where delegates may see the televised conven- 
tion proceedings between telephone calls. Illi- 
nois Bell figures roughly on 32 switchboards, 
4,000 telephones, more than 100 phone booths, 
160 private lines and 1,330 trunks. 

Chicago stations are also mapping pre-con- 
vention plans. CBS Radio will take a feed from 
its o&o WBBM called Ear on Chicago. Co- 
ordinated by Hugh Hill, local special events 
chief, the project calls for interviews at the 
amphitheatre, at the Stockyard Inn and similar 
question-and-answer sessions at Hilton party 
headquarters. It will be aired by the network 
6:05-30 p.m. (EDT) Saturday, Aug. 11, week- 
end before the convention. A similar show is 
planned for CBS by KCBS San Francisco for 
the GOP convention. 

Ear interviewees include Messrs. Reinsch 
and Christie, workmen at the amphitheatre, chef 
and headwaiter at the Stockyards Inn, and the 
foreman working on network studios in the 
amphitheatre. 

NBC Chicago will maintain a helicopter serv- 
ice for conveying personnel and equipment (in- 
cluding film reports) back and forth between 
the Merchandise Mart and the amphitheatre 
and also utilize the new Prudential Bldg. 

Also working feverishly on pre -convention 
plans are the Stevenson-for-President Commit- 
tee and the Stevenson Campaign Committee, 
for Democratic candidate Adlai Stevenson. 
Serving as press secretary for him is Roger 
Tubby, who held that post with the Truman 
administration. 

Mr. Tubby said Tuesday there have been nu- 
merous requests for Mr. Stevenson to appear on 
networks shows. Some local Stevenson-for- 
President committees have bought time on local 
stations in Richland (Wash.) and Cincinnati 
(Ohio) for a continuing series of taped broad- 
casts of Mr. Stevenson's talks, but there will be 
no appreciable purchases of time for Mr. Ste- 
venson until after the Democratic convention, 
assuming he is the Democratic presidential 
nominee. Local Stevenson groups have bought 
time in the Illinois and Florida primaries. 

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Page 84 • July 9, 1956 



Two Stations Offer 
Free Political Time 

THE Washington (D. C.) Post's Broadcast 
Division announced last week it will make 
available free time on its television stations 
(WTOP-TV Washington, WMBR-TV Jackson- 
ville, Fla.) for certain candidates during second 
primary (run-off) and general elections. These 
candidates include those seeking U. S. sena- 
torial, congressional, gubernatorial and certain 
other state and local offices, but not presi- 
dential and vice presidential candidates. 

Contending that granting of free program 
tv time to general election candidates is in 
the nature of a public service, John S. Hayes, 
president of the Post Broadcast Division, said 
no time will be sold after primary elections 
to those entitled to free time in the later elec- 
tions. The amount of free time will be de- 
termined by the station, which will take into 
account the degree and extent of local interest 
and the necessity of providing equal facilities 
under existing law, Mr. Hayes continued. 

WTOP-TV and WMBR-TV will sell time to 
presidential and vice presidential candidates 
and committees representing them, both for paid 
political spot announcements and programs, 
Mr. Hayes said. The stations will consider 
the necessity for providing equal facilities in 
determining the amount of time to be sold to 
these candidates. The commercial spot an- 
nouncement rate for these candidates will be 
the "most favored weekly rates consistent 
with the maximum purchase a candidate is 
permitted to make even though the actual pur- 
chase is less than the maximum permitted," 



Political Troubles 

"IT AIN'T RIGHT," said "Ole Jim" 
when informed that his political aspira- 
tions caused KDMS and KRBB (TV) 
both El Dorado, Ark., to lose approxi- 
mately $3,500 in air time. 

"Ole Jim," a sports commentator on 
both stations, announced his candidacy 
for state representative Feb. 29 under 
his real name, James A. Pomeroy. One 
of his three opponents recently called 
the stations' attention to Sec. 315 of the 
Communications Act which calls for 
equal time for all political candidates. 
Both stations agreed to the equal time 
request. 

"I ain't said one word about anyone 
electing me to no office. I've just gone 
along lying about the length of fish and 
trying to outguess the weatherman," ex- 
plained "Ole Jim." 



Mr. Hayes said. 

The stations also will make free time avail- 
able, aside from election of candidates, for 
discussing important local and state political 
matters such as referenda, amendment of state 
constitutions or bond issues, Mr. Hayes said. 
For such political matters, no time will be sold 
and consideration will be given to presentation 
of opposing viewpoints, he said. 

The stations will continue to provide non- 
partisan coverage on regular news broadcasts 
of political campaigns of the various candi- 
dates, Mr. Hayes said. 



Editorial Backs Free Time 
For Presidential Candidates 

EDITORIAL in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch 
favoring a Senate bill (S 3962), which would 
require television stations and networks to give 
seven hours of time to each of the presidential 
nominees of the major parties in this and other 
election years, was entered in the Congressional 
Record last week by Sen. Hubert Humphrey 
(D-Minn.), the bill's author. (Also see CBS 
President Frank Stanton's comments on this 
bill, page 82, and editorial, page 106). 

The Post-Dispatch, however, qualified its sup- 
port by saying: ". . . If the tv networks feel 
that they cannot possibly do without the revenue 
from commercial programs during this period, 
the Federal Government would be justified in 
buying the time in the name of the American 
people ... as a contribution to informed 
citizenship." 

Sen. Humphrey remarked that he had been 
"deeply encouraged by the response I have 
had concerning this bill." S 3962 was co-spon- 
sored by several other Democratic senators. 

GOP Streamlines Convention 

THE Republican National Convention opening 
Aug. 20 in San Francisco will be "streamlined 
for maximum radio-tv impact," GOP National 
Chairman Leonard W. Hall said last week. 

The GOP's arrangements committee at its 
meeting in Washington decided to study short- 
ening of the convention's overall running time, 
reducing the length of speeches and cutting 
down time of roll calls by permitting the 
polling of individual state delegations without 
interrupting the roll call of the states. 



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July >, • Page 85 



CBS-TV Plans Special Convention Orientation 



CBS-TV has scheduled two special, closed-cir- 
cuit telecasts on July 23 and July 25 (both 
5-5:30 p.m. EDT) to orient the 7,000 dele- 
gates and alternates to the 1956 Republican and 
Democratic presidential conventions on plans 
for CBS' radio and tv coverage of the conven- 
tions and the part the delegates will play. 

The Democratic delegates will see and hear 
Paul M. Butler, chairman of the party's na- 
tional committee, and CBS newsmen discuss 
the network's coverage plans on July 23, while 
their Republican counterparts will be exposed 
to a similar program July 25, at which GOP 
National Chairman Leonard Hall will speak. 



The delegates have been invited to see the 
orientation telecasts at the offices of the CBS- 
TV affiliated station nearest their homes. Speak- 
ers will include Sig Mickelson, CBS vice presi- 
dent in charge of news and public affairs and 
CBS newsmen Walter Cronkite, Bob Trout, 
Douglas Edwards and Charles Collingwood. 

Governors of the 48 states and the local 
press also will be invited to the closed-circuit 
broadcasts. Television recordings of the pro- 
grams will be made available to convention 
delegates outside the continental limits of the 
U. S. in Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Canal 
Zone and the Virgin Islands. 



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'Record 7 News Coverage 
Set for Demo Convention 

THE Democratic National Convention, which 
opens Aug. 13 in Chicago, will have the larg- 
est, on-the-spot, concentrated news coverage 
of any event ever 
held anywhere in the 
world, J. Leonard 
Reinsch. assistant to 
the chairman of the 
national committee, 
said last week. Mr. 
Reinsch, who will 
manage the 1956 
convention, is man- 
aging director of the 
Cox radio-tv proper- 
ties (WSB-AM-TV 
Atlanta, others). 

He said nearly 
4,000 newsmen from 
radio-tv, newspapers and magazines will be on 
hand to cover the nominating convention. "Be- 
cause of the untiring ingenuity of America's 
vast corps of television and radio people, its 
newspapermen and its magazine writers, every 
citizen in this country and throughout the 
world, will have a convention-side seat during 
every minute of this history-making meeting," 
Mr. Reinsch said. 

Mr. Reinsch made his statement in the first 
of a series of progress reports on arrange- 
ments to be issued by the committee each 
Thursday for Sunday release until convention 
time. 

New Election Shows Planned 

TWO supplementary 1956 election year pro- 
grams will make their debut on ABC this 
month. First to take the air (July 1) on 
ABC Radio was Listening Post (7:35-8 p.m. 
EDT), a series of reports on crucial issues of 
the forthcoming campaigns by staff members 
of ABC News and Newsweek magazine. The 
program will be on each Sunday until the eve 
of the Democratic convention, Aug. 13. The 
other, Campaign Roundup, scheduled to start 
July 15 (Sundays, 4-4:30 p.m., ABC-TV), also 
will feature combined reports from ABC and 
Newsweek. The latter will be represented by 
Malcolm Muir, chairman of the editorial board, 
Washington bureau head Ernest K. Lindley 
and senior staff members Harold Lavine and 
Kenneth Crawford, among others. 

New Political Spot Available 

A TWENTY-SECOND spot announcement 
that ties in with the upcoming political con- 
ventions has been produced by J. Armstrong 
& Co., New York and already has been s